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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that psyllium husk is good for cleaning out sand in your horse's stomach. As far as I am aware, psyllium and maxisoy have similar properties, so I was wondering if Maxisoy can also be used for this purpose?

Also, is psyllium husk from the supermarket the same as that from horse feed stores? Are both safe to just soak and then feed?
 

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Psyllium husks are psyllium husks. Care taken to produce and package human use and horse use may vary some but not much. Cheaper to feed horse version to horses. What makes it work is that it is mucilagenous when wet in the digestion process. Not so with soy. The hills are fibrous but I don't know that they would be as effective.
 

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A study done some time back found long stem, grassy hay cleared sand better than psyllium.


"A study conducted at the University of Illinois reported that ponies dosed with psyllium in an attempt to remove sand were not any more efficient at sand removal than ponies given a control diet.

They concluded that psyllium had no apparent effect on sand removal from the horse’s large intestine. The University of Florida tested four means of sand removal: 1) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight, 2) hay fed at 2.5% of body weight, 3) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight plus psyllium fed in a single daily dose and 4) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight with psyllium fed twice daily. The results indicated that feeding large amounts of hay (2.5% of body weight, 25 lbs. for a 1000 lb. horse) uniformly produced the largest sand output. Other experiments studied feeding wheat bran and dosing with mineral oil as methods to remove sand. Both protocols proved ineffective for sand removal."


My horses live in an Arizona dry lot corral. They eat Bermuda Hay. In 12 years, the three of them have had no problems with sand colic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A study done some time back found long stem, grassy hay cleared sand better than psyllium.


"A study conducted at the University of Illinois reported that ponies dosed with psyllium in an attempt to remove sand were not any more efficient at sand removal than ponies given a control diet.

They concluded that psyllium had no apparent effect on sand removal from the horse’s large intestine. The University of Florida tested four means of sand removal: 1) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight, 2) hay fed at 2.5% of body weight, 3) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight plus psyllium fed in a single daily dose and 4) hay fed at 1.5% of body weight with psyllium fed twice daily. The results indicated that feeding large amounts of hay (2.5% of body weight, 25 lbs. for a 1000 lb. horse) uniformly produced the largest sand output. Other experiments studied feeding wheat bran and dosing with mineral oil as methods to remove sand. Both protocols proved ineffective for sand removal."


My horses live in an Arizona dry lot corral. They eat Bermuda Hay. In 12 years, the three of them have had no problems with sand colic.
Wow, you've really done your research! So you would recommend just feeding some plain hay?
 

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It may depend on where you live. The article mentions some places where sand sticks to hay. That isn't an issue in southern Arizona. But my three seem to do just fine with Bermuda hay - a long stem hay - and snacks of pelleted hay. They don't compete in anything and don't have any barn drama since they live in my backyard. Based on my reading, though, it seems hay can work better than the psyllium products.
 

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Agree about long stemmed hay for sand clearance. At my last barn the horse paddocks were sand, and the barn owner said they'd never had a horse with sand colic in 40 years. I was worried at first about the horses eating on sand. The horses had lots of hay and grazed on pasture during the day. No one fed psyllium or sand clear, and in the several years I was there no horses had colic issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone.

One of my horses is still learning to eat out of a feed bin, he has only ever used a nosebag and therefore drops his food all over the ground, which is sandy. Of course he then tries to eat it off the ground. I have since bought him a nosebag to try and prevent him consuming sand, but sometimes I just don't have the time to wait for him to finish his meal and take the nosebag off, so he has to use a feed bin. I've noticed a lot of sand in the bottom of his trough when I'm cleaning it as well.

So I'm trying to find out how best to clean out his digestive tracf before colic becomes an issue. I will try to locate some long stemmed hay!
 

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Buy a large mat or two and place them under where the feed bin is...a barrier now exists between sand and dropped food "should" reduce the ingesting of excessive sand...
Now you need to sweep sand off the mats though...

For me, not needing to guess how much to give, how often to give in a sand cleansing routine is peace of mind and time consuming not anymore.
I feed Sand Clear as directed, as needed when needed and never have had a issue of sand colic nor do I see a large accumulation of sand when I monthly do a check of the guts poop..

The upside many not mention, some not know is a gut with sand accumulation and lining the intestinal tract also restricts nutrient absorption.
So having a "lesser load" of sand along with reducing the chance of a sand colic also may make your horse a easier animal to feed and maintain their health....pluses all of them for checking & treating for sand in the gut if present.
🐴...
 

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I have one mate that I feed SandClear too as without it at regular intervals she has a problem. I was told sand was the issue with one of my draft mares that spent time at the equine hospital during a really bad bout. Turns out it was the hay. I had heard stories of bermuda colic and blew them off as mine had eaten bermuda all of their lives. Still do. But there are certain growing conditions that produce an extra fine, soft textured leaf. Avoid those bales like the plague. That is what causes the colic. It knots, then balls and finally causes an impaction colic.
 

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Correct, fine stems and product is what I too was told avoid at all cost even though the horses love it...
If it is a mix of fine and wider stem/leaf it should be OK, but wider and leafier blade is better than fine & soft was said from my vet too when he was looking at my hay...{Thankfully he said we're good}
🐴...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have ordered several Sandbuster online (cheaper), so I'll see how that goes! We only have access to two types of hay in my area, which are Rhodes and Lucerne. I feed Rhodes to my horses, though only when there is little feed in my paddock or if they are being stalled due to bad weather. It generally is very fine though....

I can't believe I didn't think of the mat thing before hand, so thank you!
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