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Why is it that some people that ride english despise those who ride western and vice versa.... I have a friend that lives in an area that has horse trails but was told she can not ride on them unless she rides english? Why is that? I mean we should all be here for the horse and not what or how one rides? If we, horse owners, band together we could achieve alot, but as long as we let different riding styles split us then we can not achieve as much.
 

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Western people like to think they are better than English people. English people like to think they are better than Western people and blah blah blah...

It's stupid.

She may just be more comfortable in an english saddle. The points of balance on and english saddle and a western saddle are very different. when I went on a beach ride in NC for vacation, I requested a horse that rides english because that was what I was comfortable with.
 

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Some people just can't see past their own opinions. You do whats comfortable for you and just ignore narrow minded ignorance
 

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It is also the fact that many people who ride western don't see the purpose for riding english and it seems to them like a waste of time as they aren't "accomplishing anything". I ride western, will probably never ride english, but I can understand how some people would prefer it.
 

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I know around here a lot of people ride western (and i speak more so from the draft side of things) so i preferr the english option just because not a whole lot of people do it. Its kind of like those who don't like to follow the crowd, but i can see why people choose the one they do, both have pros and cons. Tis a shame that some separate themselves like that, but at some point you just need to move on. Its all we can do in this world really.
 

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people have always despised things that are different and things they don't understand. Areas that are more diverse in discipline are more likely to be tolerant and understanding than areas that are almost all western and then you're the one english rider, just like any other sort of diversity issue. In the end, western style and english style are more alike than what first meets the eye.
 

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Why is it that some people that ride english despise those who ride western and vice versa.... I have a friend that lives in an area that has horse trails but was told she can not ride on them unless she rides english?
Who told her that? Is it a real rule?
 

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People are arrogant, ignorant and down right dumb a lot of the time. We should celebrate diversity. Not frown upon it.
 

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I have a friend that lives in an area that has horse trails but was told she can not ride on them unless she rides english?
Not jumping on the 'people suck' bandwagon, but I do have a question about this.

Are you sure that's what she's been told? Unless a horse trail is privately owned, no one gets to dictate what tack others may use. Public trails are open to every riding discipline.

I ride English and have done so my whole riding life. Tried Western and it wasn't my cup of tea. Each to their own.
 

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I don't know anyone who rides English. In this part of the country there are very few English type events or riders. If you don't rodeo, ranch or trail ride, then there is little to do for a horse person.
I would never judge someone who came to our saddle club and wanted to ride English. I may worry about their safety the first time their horse meets a cow but I have no problem with them riding with us.
I have never understood the difference a saddle horn and a few different cue signals make when it comes to horsemanship
 

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Vida, I live on the east coast which is mostly English, but we do have some Western riders.

The biggest problem I found when riding in Western tack was that I kept trying to get myself into my 'proper' English equitation position. Tired me the heck out!

Western saddles put you into a completely different seat than English.

I've met more than my share of cows in an English saddle. Wouldn't want to round 'em up or team pen in one, but just riding past them didn't cause me any undue issues. :wink:
 

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I went cattle penning in an English saddle. My mom randomly loaded up Cougar, paid to go practice but changed her mind. Rather than not waste the money I thought heck why not . The western saddle I was supposed to use did not fit him properly so I used my saddle. I lived to tell the tale.
 

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As an English rider, I can tell you confidently, that there is no valid reason for requiring a rider to "ride English" or equally to "ride Western".
I would suggest you replied to whomever told you that you had to ride English
the one word "rubbish".
As long as you have control of your horse in an open environment you can use whatever tack you choose to use. The horse won't say a word.
 

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As an English rider, I can tell you confidently, that there is no valid reason for requiring a rider to "ride English" or equally to "ride Western".
I would suggest you replied to whomever told you that you had to ride English
the one word "rubbish".
As long as you have control of your horse in an open environment you can use whatever tack you choose to use. The horse won't say a word.
Exactly!
Sorry I didn't mean to sound like an English rider couldn't handle cattle. Just that the saddle isn't as secure. As for the stirrup placement on western saddles and making it difficult to maintain a balanced position, I couldn't agree more. One reason I prefer an endurance type saddle with no horn and more stirrup swing.
 

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Until I got my stock saddle a few months ago, I used to do our 'snowy river ride' in a wintec 500. Headfirst down a steep hill with rocks and logs and long grass and rabbit holes after the darn sheep who knew if they got to that gate before I did we couldn't get them back. Full gallop down there sure got the adrenalin pumping and I never came close to being unseated - if you are used to the saddle you ride in, you can be just as secure in any type of tack.

I'm with Vida - A different saddle and a few different cue's/focus = That's all it is. It is still riding and it is still getting out there enjoying your horse. I'm happy to say I don't fit into either stereotype - I ride in typically 'english' events and I ride in typically 'western' events - All in the same saddle and on the same horse.
 

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Until I got my stock saddle a few months ago, I used to do our 'snowy river ride' in a wintec 500. Headfirst down a steep hill with rocks and logs and long grass and rabbit holes after the darn sheep who knew if they got to that gate before I did we couldn't get them back. Full gallop down there sure got the adrenalin pumping and I never came close to being unseated - if you are used to the saddle you ride in, you can be just as secure in any type of tack.

I'm with Vida - A different saddle and a few different cue's/focus = That's all it is. It is still riding and it is still getting out there enjoying your horse. I'm happy to say I don't fit into either stereotype - I ride in typically 'english' events and I ride in typically 'western' events - All in the same saddle and on the same horse.
Of course you can! I'd be on my **** or noggin :lol:
 

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One reason may because of the helmet. Most western riders that I know never wear a helmet. While I don't know an english rider that doesn't wear a helmet whenever they're on a horse. Tell your friend to ask if he/she can go on the trail if he/she has a helmet on. The property owners may be worried about a liability issue.

I now have to ride at the barn with a helmet on. Only because of the big accident I had last year (in which I think my head was the only part on me that didn't get bruised or hurt). The BO decided he didn't want to take any chances. BUT, when I ride out away from the barn, I keep the helmet with me just in case it is required by the property owner. But if it doesn't matter, I don't wear it at all.

It really wouldn't hurt to ask though.
 

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Of course you can! I'd be on my **** or noggin :lol:
Lol! Mostly it was because I had good horses :]

Most people say a stock saddle is the most secure saddle you can get - When I got mine after riding in wintecs for 8+ years, I felt so insecure! It took me a while to adjust and get used to it.

I feel as long as you are used to what you ride in, you should be fine.
 

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Vida
It is not me that is frightened of those big four legged creatures with long tails and two horns poking out of the top of their heads - it is my horse. She takes one look at them, and immediately they go: "moo" she is off like a startled rabbit. She looks like a Lusitano but she'd be no good in the bull ring.

A Western saddle might help me stay in the saddle but what with DiDi's fear of cows and my non existent ability with a rope, there would not be much point.

B G
 
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