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We have an old mare (24) who has recently begun stocking up. She is on 24/7 turnout and is currently at a good weight (came through the winter thinner than I'd like, but the vet only wanted her to gain around 40 lbs, which she has and then some, but not what I'd consider overweight). She has started stocking up in her hind legs within the last week. Her rider had not ridden her for 2 weeks due to trying to meet graduation requirements (no excuse, I know, but this is where we are now.) We've been hosing, riding, then hosing again, and they look ok when we are done, but by the next afternoon are stocked up again, though not as bad as before. Is there something we could be doing to help her? She doesn't seem to be in pain, and is sound, but this is distressing for both me, and her rider. We've owned her for 3.5 years and the only time she has stocked up on us before was when she was in a stall for 18 hours with no exercise. Nothing has changed from her day to day routine except for the lack of riding for the last two weeks.

Is this something that could resolve on its own with regular enforced exercise (eg. riding), or do I need to get the vet out? He was out at the end of Feb to check her over and float her teeth and she was good then, though a little underweight. I would love to hear some constructive advice and opionions. :-|
 

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I would be inclined to get the vet &/or a good bodyworker out. Despite what you see, she could well be in pain, so not moving much at all when she can help it, just too well trained/stoic to slow her down when you ask for work. Another possibility is kidney/liver issues causing her to retain fluid, but you'd expect that to show up in all feet.
 

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I went on vacation for 6 days last year and when I came back my mare was stocked up pretty bad. I called my vet and he suggested pillow wraps with polo wraps over that, hosing and hand walking to reduce swelling and not to ride for a few days until it was under control. What I learned on my own from hospital experience: massage the area. This will increase blood flow and take the fluid out. But what worked for me was cold water hose down, then walk for no less then 10 minutes no more then 20, hose again, massage, let the legs dry, then pillow wraps. Just until the swelling goes down then I would say slowly work back into riding. Consulting your vet to find the best plan for your horse is the best solution though. I did that routine at least once a day, sometimes twice and she was good to go in 3 days :)
 

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Our horses live in the pasture 24/7 unless they are ill or there's sleet or an ice storm. The only time our 20 year old OTTB stocks up is when he's stalled. Turning him out solves it every time. So far.
 

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How is the horse otherwise? Attitude? Eating, etc?

Horay Allyssum can cause stocking as well as a couple of tick borne illnesses.
 
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