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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Say you have taken in an "unbroke" horse for two months... You are confident and assure the customer they will be able to ride their horse at the end of the 60 day period (you are training 5 days per week).

First week of training: the horse is cooperative taking the bit. However, the horse is very mouthy at the bit (without a rider). What would you do? Do you feel it would be appropriate to let the horse just stand around with a saddle and bridle for a week (nothing else) to get used to it? Or would you proceed with the training, start ground driving (or hop on-pending trainer preference), and let the horse get used to it during driving/riding?

Thanks. :) trying to find out if I'm being paranoid...
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I would proceed with the training. The horse will get used to it and doesn't need to be standing around for a week.
 

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Proceed, the only to make progress is to keep moving. After all 60 days means a lot of work for an unbroke horse, standing around accomplishes nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! I am feeling the same way. Anyone else care to share their opinion? I'm getting opposite opinions on another forum. Curious to see what majority rules...
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No, not yet. She plans to. So far she has been sitting wearing a saddle (which she alalready been doing for months) and wearing a bridle. No riding at all.
is the trainer not riding your horse?
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Really hard to second guess this from an internet posting without any other information.

Clearly you don't trust the trainer or her methods. How and why did you select this trainer?

And what's your contract with her? Do you want to pull the horse out of there? Do you want to find another trainer? Do you get money back if you're not satisfied with the results?

If you've been guaranteed a ridable horse at the end of 60 days, my concern would be that the trainer would be tempted to push the horse too fast, not that the trainer would be going to slow.

I'm assuming you hired a trainer because you didn't feel you had the ability to break the horse to saddle yourself?

If this trainer was recommended to you, and you like the results she's achieved previously, take a deep breath, chill out, and let her do the job you hired her to do. There is probably a reason why she's approaching your horse this way. You might even consider asking *her* the reason why.

There's really only two choices here - trust this trainer, or find another one you can trust.
 

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I tend to rush things but I am on the horse the first day, the second at most. I don't worry about the horse getting use to the bit or saddle. It is on go the saddle, the bridle, someone holds the horse and I climb aboard. They give me a pony ride and if I feel I have a hold on the horse they turn me loose.
By the 4th to 6th day I take off alone in the open fields and head into the bush. The horse learns by doing and I prefer to ride alone at this stage.
 

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No, not yet. She plans to. So far she has been sitting wearing a saddle (which she alalready been doing for months) and wearing a bridle. No riding at all.
How old is the horse?
 

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60 Days Training

There is a expression the fastest way to train a horse is very slowly.That being said something should be done with the horse in training that will help the horse understand why they are there and not at home hanging out in the pasture.If one method is not working the trainer should change the way it is presented to the horse and ask again.The phrase is having the horse understand what you mean by what you do.You do want the horse to think about the process not just be reacting without thought.Also have the trainer explain why ?If the answer still doesn't feel right maybe its time to move on.
 

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I'm not a professional trainer, but I have trained plenty of horses for myself and others. I would keep working this horse as it gets used to the bit. The horse should be getting a daily workout session and then it can just stand around with saddle & bridle for the rest of the day. Or vice versa...stand around while tacked up & then get the daily workout. In my barn, the horse would probably be lunged without the bridle, then ground driven with the bridle, then ridden with or without the bridle (changing over to a sidepull) depending on the horse that particular day.

HOWEVER, if I were taking in horses for training, I would never give the customer a 60 day guarantee that the horse will be broke enough for them to ride it. Most likely this will be the case, but each horse is different and each customer's riding abilities are different. I would tell a customer that it would take "at least" so long to get what they are looking for.
 

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No, not yet. She plans to. So far she has been sitting wearing a saddle (which she alalready been doing for months) and wearing a bridle. No riding at all.
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I have used this method, but only after the first 10 rides. It does teach patience and acceptance leaving them to stand tied all day. But I don't think doing it at the beginning on every single horse you start does you much good.

Have you asked her reasoning on this method? If not, have you let your trainer know what you want to accomplish in the end? If she is confident she will give you what you ask for, I wouldn't worry about it much because you can always ask for your money back if you don't get what you're guaranteed in the beginning.
 

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There is a expression the fastest way to train a horse is very slowly.
I don't agree with this slowly. I saturate the horse with training right off the bat. I get the horse out on trial as quickly as possible and then start training situations. The horse has steering, side passing, backing, stopping, hills for balance and situations thrown at him all at once. I will hold off water crossings for a few weeks but then they too are thrown in.
One guy at our barn had his horse out for professional training and I asked him how it was coming. He told me the horse has been ridden 32 times and they have yet to pull a rein. They just let the horse wander with a rider aboard. Don't want to rush anything.
 

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I plan a new situation into the horses ride every ride for the first few months. Rides involving trickly water crossings, steep slides down gullies, construction sites with heavy equipment, busy farm yards and ride into the massive cattle barns, working in a sand pit sliding down steep slides and walking threw every mud hole we can find until he does it without thinking.
Lots and lots of road miles to condition him to cars and trucks, railway lines to trains. A truck repair garage for walking between big trucks.

Yesterday was a heavy melt day, hot sun and the snow was melting which ment the ditches were running high with water. My guy crossed alot of them yesterday just to keep in practice for the dry days.

I saturate him with experience and don't take it slow.
Garbage day is another good day to run roads. Lots a strange things to explore on the side of the road, blue boxes to side pass over or weave through. I even took him in a parade a few months into his training again for experience.
 

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If I had to guess I would say this trainer is not too experienced and is a little scared to get on the horse. I would much rather get on a horse that has only been saddled a time or two. they are a little more nervous about the saddle and wieght to do very much bucking and carrying on. By the time the horse is confident enough to try to buck I have enough control to talk the horse out of it.

If I sent a fairly gentle horse to a trainer and after two weeks it had not been ridden I would pick the horse up and take it to someone else. I have gotten some really rank horses that weren't even halter broke that took me two weeks to get to riding but that is the exception and I was the first person to ever lay a hand on them.

The fact that he gave you any gaurantee also suggests that he is inexperienced. I won't even guarentee that the horse will stay alive. I just don't know what will happen with the horse and I will not be held responsible if someones horse falls and breaks a leg or just up and dies. I also can't tell all the time how fast the horse will catch on or how broncy the horse might be. I have had some horses for 60 days and my kids could ride them and you would think they had been ridden for years and others it takes 60 days to get them convinced they shouldn't try to buck me off every ride.
 

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Again, I have to agree with Kevin!

I wonder if the "trainer" considered being "mouthy at the bit" as the horse playing with it? What better excuse for a horse to continue to play with the bit if all it does is sit in his/her mouth?

I would seriously consider asking your trainer to ride your horse, or changing trainers if possible.
 

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I have to agree with RD and Kevin. Even if my horses are playing with the bit a lot, I will get on them and work them. Playing with the bit is something that 99% of young horses will do at first and if you sit around to wait for them to stop before riding, there are some that you would NEVER ride. There are horses out there that continue to want to play with the bit until they are old an retired.

IMHO, the best way to get a horse content with the bit is to give them something to think about while they are wearing it, like the person on their back telling them what to do LOL. But then again, I never have been one for screwing around with a horse for a month before riding the first time. Like Kevin said once, after I get them under saddle, a lot of the ground work seems to happen on it's own. Dobe didn't even know how to lead the first few times I rode him, let alone lunging or giving to pressure on hips/sides/shoulder, and now it seems like he knows what I want him to do before I tell him and there has never been a day of groundwork done in his training except for his first farrier day. But not too many people are terribly comfortable with that approach and many are scared to push a young horse for the fear of getting bucked off.

I have found that most times when a horse has it in his mind to try to buck you off, it won't matter if the first ride happens 6 hours or 60 days after you start messing with them. They will still buck. If this trainer has never dealt with a draft, I can understand them being just a bit nervous about getting on (I was the first time I rode John), but that is not an excuse to stretch out the groundwork for days or weeks longer than needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Will you train my horse then? LOL! That's exactly what I want.... A good, solid trail horse. She doesn't spook easily, though...thank God!
I plan a new situation into the horses ride every ride for the first few months. Rides involving trickly water crossings, steep slides down gullies, construction sites with heavy equipment, busy farm yards and ride into the massive cattle barns, working in a sand pit sliding down steep slides and walking threw every mud hole we can find until he does it without thinking.
Lots and lots of road miles to condition him to cars and trucks, railway lines to trains. A truck repair garage for walking between big trucks.

Yesterday was a heavy melt day, hot sun and the snow was melting which ment the ditches were running high with water. My guy crossed alot of them yesterday just to keep in practice for the dry days.

I saturate him with experience and don't take it slow.
Garbage day is another good day to run roads. Lots a strange things to explore on the side of the road, blue boxes to side pass over or weave through. I even took him in a parade a few months into his training again for experience.
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Training is like a funell. You start with the big end and ork your way to the small end and out comes a better horse. How you get from the big end to the little end is not a defined structured roadmap. Every trainer does things a little different but the good ones always find the small end.

That said the only way to the small end is lots of consistent work--every day. Without that you will not find the small end.
 

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i really agree with maura if she has had good results in the past leave it be, its what she does for a living so she should know what she doing, so relax :D
 
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