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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our 5 yr old lightly raced TB mare is spelling here at home. She raced lethargically last start and trainer was advised by vet a fortnight previous that a blood sample showed low magnesium levels. She was supplemented leading up to the race. Brought home next day and she reacted strongly to acupuncture/pressure spots for ulcers over the next week. We will spell her until she is cured. What is my best course of action please? We r in Australia. I'm thinking of bathing her in Epsom Salts, but how many times? Best feeds for spelling/ racing/ulcer prevention? Ulcer cure? Really appreciate some tips from anyone who's seen successful outcomes, thanks in advance:runninghorse2:
 

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Hi from Canada,

Certainly a go-to drug up here for ulcers is omeprazole - but, if she is showing clear signs, I would think you should talk to a vet - perhaps you need to have a scope done to start with to see how bad the issue is. The only real way to confirm ulcers is the scope - and then you will know how "heavy-duty" the medication needs to be.

A lot of times, ulcers come from stress and/or feeding issues. Does she get turnout at all? Does she get time to socialize with other horses? Does she have access to 24/7 hay?

Horses produce a crazy amount of stomach acid every day - something like 10 gallons a day - and hay acts as a buffer for that acid. So, while you are waiting for the vet, I would give her hay 24/7. You want her to always have forage going through her so the stomach acid is kept in check.

Pelleted feed does not help this issue. She needs hay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, thanks for replying. She has access to hay and grass here, with Breeda pellets and bran. She has an open stable with yard and day paddock next to other horses when in training. Not sure how much and when hay is available beside her hard feeds. Paddocks have a covering of grass but probably horse sick from constant use.
 

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Hi back!
The grass might not be doing her any favours either - although, you are in your Fall season down there so, the grass would have less sugars in it.

I have a gelding who has chronic gastritis - he has to stay in a really crappy (no grass) paddock and have hay outside. All his hay feedings are soaked for an hour to get sugar out of it - but he has it available all the time - I put it in a slow feeder so he doesn't get fat - but he eats allllll the time. And he's on omeprazole.

I noticed a difference within two weeks.

I would still get a vet to check for the ulcers - you might need strong meds to help - or you might be fine with just changing her feed.
 

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You should put her on meds for that. Talk to the vet. Omeprazole is the go-to.

Ulcers are very common in racehorses. For now, low stress and lots of forage and minimal hard feed (if she can keep weight with forage alone awesome!).

Magnesium can't you just feed her straight pellets or something? I would go the feed through option. It's easier and easier to regulate.

She needs a regular source not one or two bathes then nothing.

I understood Magnesium didn't show well in bloodwork.

At this point I think it's just a matter of calling the vet back and asking what is recommended for these issues.
 

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Your best course of action, "CALL THE VET"....
Since this seems a ongoing problem the horse should be under vet care and diagnosed and treated for exactly what her problems are and not "guessed" at.
Blood work showed a deficiency in magnesium....any follow-up blood work done and a improvement?

Horses who are having a issue that calls a vet in usually need a vet till they are free of the ailment and a
long term care treatment plan is established and found to be working.

Call the vet, don't guess about doing this or that.
If you plan on ever returning this horse to the races, to be competitive and to just have good health you need to be pro-active and follow up on the care a vet diagnosed as needed.
That means supplements and periodic blood-work to evaluate the numbers... and a vet to do follow-up care...

jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, vet still involved just waiting from info the trainer said he would forward to me regarding magnesium levels and blood work and follow up date. I have picked up on the ulcers in the meantime and interested in knowing what others have done besides or in conjunction with Omeprazole which I'm sure is what will be advised?
 

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If you own the horse and you pay the animals bills, contact the treating vet yourself and ask for a copy of the results. They should willingly furnish all those labs/test results along with the follow-up date. You do own the horse.
A good reason to reach out to this vet as the horse isn't on the track now but home on R&R and that vet needs to come to you anyway for the follow-up...a great heads up so the vet can schedule accordingly!
Internet saves so much valuable time today and a copy of the entire blood chemistry can be scanned and sent within a few hours so you have all of it.
You're not looking to cut-out the trainer but to treat the horse properly so a return to race work can occur sooner and with greater successes!

Glad you picked up on the ulcers.
Treating them successfully and completely will make the horse so much more comfortable...
I can't imagine ever being able to do your very best with a belly ache bothering you....poor horse.

Best of luck!!
 

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Ditch the bran. It doesn't work in horses like it does people. It can also create a calcium imbalance and calcium and magnesium need to work in harmony. Magnesium helps with relaxation which may account for her lethargy during her last race. Maybe too much? If it were my horse I'd put her on senior pellets and hay and grass 24/7. 2 lbs per 2x daily of the pellets. That and omeprazole if vet confirmed.
 

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Its commonly over looked that one of the main reasons racehorses (and any horse in regular fast work) get ulcers is down to this factor
QUOTE:
Research has shown that training has an effect on stomach acid levels. Horses fed the same diet prior to and during training had higher acid levels during the training period. More recent studies have also discovered what is known as the ‘mechanical’ effect. During galloping, pressure from the abdomen causes the stomach to contract, pushing acid from the lower stomach up in to the more vulnerable upper stomach, thus further increasing acid exposure in these animals.


It's recommended that prior to a race or competition/hunting that the horse gets a small high fiber meal to help 'buffer' the acid
A course of antacids or a proton pump inhibitor like Omeprazole will help 'cure' the existing ulcers and from then on it can probably be kept under control by diet
Magnesium based antacids will also help with the deficiency - though I fail to see how bathing in Epsom salts will help something that's in the digestive system - and avoid using them (Magnesium Sulfate) as an antacid or source of magnesium to feed as its got quite a strong laxative effect.
Severe ulcers will cause anemia - might be worth testing for as that will cause lethargy.
I'm using a magnesium based supplement right now on one of my horses and its done nothing at all to lower her energy levels or enthusiasm to 'go go go'
 

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Saddlebag- the vet said horse has a magnesium deficiency, as in too little.

Magnesium is easily (more easily?) absorbed through the skin if I'm correct so that is a valid way to supplement, though as I said I'm not sure it's the best way. (Harder, more time consuming, difficult to determine amount absorbed etc) I don't think the OP meant it to help the ulcers at all..

There are many ways to orally supplement magnesium. It's my understanding pretty much any form is valid (though some more then others of course) and if you are getting loose manure it's the result of too much too quickly. I get the MVP 5,000 through SmartPak which I believe you don't have but maybe you can get MVP products? It's a pellet. Very easy. I was concerned about supplementing because you get into "dissolve this powder, feed this much of that powder, work up slowly, not this other powder" blah. They do make pellets though! I'm sure they have something available in your area.

Anemia is a very interesting thought. She may just be feeling miserable though. I wouldn't want to be sprinting if I had ulcers. I don't know if you need specific testing though. Check her gums and such, though maybe that only works in severe cases?
 

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You have to actually sit in a tub of water with magnesium sulfate in it (Epsom salts) for a reasonable length of time to absorb enough to make a difference - and even then I'm not sure it would work as well as using a proprietary antacid taken orally because I haven't found a medical research trials to support it - only ones done for or by 'alternative' medicine companies to support their own products
Though given the effectiveness of Epsom salts as a laxative I'm not sure that I'd want to use it myself if it was going to get into my stomach in large amounts!!!
 

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Gastric ulcers

Recently I found out that the barn owners were dumping bleach in the water without measuring... 1 tsp per 20g is supposed to be safe... they were using greater than 1/4c in aprox 50gal

My 18yr old Mustang gelding began eating slower & slower. I had the vet out & we decided since he wasn't showing signs of colic we'd start omeprazole... also I have been using this diet & advice for 2 weeks

http://equinenutritionnerd.com/2014/01/02/alternative-options-for-stomach-ulcer-treatment-prevention/

I soak the mixture for a couple hours & feed twice a day w/ constant access to soaked grass hay.

I also give him a mixture of papain (papaya) powder, slippery elm bark powder & aloe vera juice to sooth, coat & heal... via syringe.

He seems better everyday... the mornings seem to be the most uncomfortable for him... any advice is greatly appreciated and I hope this info is useful. :cowboy:
 

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Recently I found out that the barn owners were dumping bleach in the water without measuring... 1 tsp per 20g is supposed to be safe... they were using greater than 1/4c in aprox 50gal

My 18yr old Mustang gelding began eating slower & slower. I had the vet out & we decided since he wasn't showing signs of colic we'd start omeprazole... also I have been using this diet & advice for 2 weeks

http://equinenutritionnerd.com/2014/01/02/alternative-options-for-stomach-ulcer-treatment-prevention/

I soak the mixture for a couple hours & feed twice a day w/ constant access to soaked grass hay.

I also give him a mixture of papain (papaya) powder, slippery elm bark powder & aloe vera juice to sooth, coat & heal... via syringe.

He seems better everyday... the mornings seem to be the most uncomfortable for him... any advice is greatly appreciated and I hope this info is useful. :cowboy:
Excuse me....
Are you really asking for our advice or telling us of your experience?

If advice....
If you haven't moved barns WHY THE HECK NOT???

Your horse is being poisoned by the B/O with bleach products....
That is my first thought....GET OUT!!!

Then, since you are under vets care already....follow what the vet has told you to do.
We are not vets and we don't know your horse, the levels of distress nor all symptoms.
Only your licensed, qualified vet you trust to treat your horse would I seek treatment advice from....
If you don't trust your vet, get another vet you do trust.

Sorry, I won't touch this one with a ten foot pole...these are really serious comments and allegations you present on a public forum....

I offer best of luck and hope the horse makes a full recovery especially if the barn is the same and the practices of those in charge have not made some HUGE changes in care.
 

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I don't think the horse is at that barn any more - it was where she was sent for training/racing.
 

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I don't think the horse is at that barn any more - it was where she was sent for training/racing.
I sure hope you are right jaydee....

This isn't the original poster but a new poster and their first post... hence my obvious concern raised and my response.


:gallop::gallop:...run away as fast and as far as you can from that barn ang13.... run far!!
 

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Ditch the bran. It doesn't work in horses like it does people. It can also create a calcium imbalance and calcium and magnesium need to work in harmony. Magnesium helps with relaxation which may account for her lethargy during her last race. Maybe too much? If it were my horse I'd put her on senior pellets and hay and grass 24/7. 2 lbs per 2x daily of the pellets. That and omeprazole if vet confirmed.
Saddlebag beat me to it-ditch the bran. You can feed a magnesium supplement (what is bathing the horse in Epson salt supposed to do, far as Magnesium blood levels?
Grass hay is also low in Ca. Feed an alfalfa mixed hay, which is good also for ulcers, due to Calcium level

As aside note, horse low in Magnesium are usually hyper reactive, not lethargic! )
 

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What are breeda pellets?
Race horses need to be fed like race horses, thus a feed with good caloric and protein levels
 

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I sure hope you are right jaydee....

This isn't the original poster but a new poster and their first post... hence my obvious concern raised and my response.


:gallop::gallop:...run away as fast and as far as you can from that barn ang13.... run far!!
Oops I missed that - glad one of us is awake and alert!!!!

Yes I totally agree with you on the cut and run from that place
 
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