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The majority of the top barrel horses in the industry are race-bred.

my barrel mare has some of the top racing bloodlines. Illegal Runaway, Dash For Cash, Beduino, Zevi, Lucks Chic Gay. All those horses have either hit the track, or have sired incredible foals that have.

The horse your looking at, I'd walk away just by seeing those front legs. Its a shame, because I like the rest of him.
 

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He's really good looking, just very fine boned. A little bigger boned and he would be AMAZING.
 

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Have any of you tried using a racing quarter horse for barrels? I didn't know if it was a good idea because they might have problems with the turns. the one below is one of the horses I'm looking at.
A large majority of barrel racers use off-the-track quarter horses who used to race. They often need a little "retraining" but they usually make fine barrel horses because of their speed.


The horse your looking at, I'd walk away just by seeing those front legs.
What are you seeing with his front legs?
 

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They are too fine-boned. Looks to be tied in at the back of the knee too. And the hind leg I can see, the cannon bone is long and lean, again, too fine boned for a barrel prospect.
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What's his breeding? He is a bit fine-boned, however, I have seen a good bit of solid barrel horses with legs about like his. How he handles the strain of the barrels will depend alot on who is in his pedigree. If he has any of the three great "bars" sugar, three, or doc he may well be a tough horse. Many of those produced finer boned horses, but they are all very hardy.
 

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The majority of the top barrel horses in the industry are race-bred.

my barrel mare has some of the top racing bloodlines. Illegal Runaway, Dash For Cash, Beduino, Zevi, Lucks Chic Gay. All those horses have either hit the track, or have sired incredible foals that have.

The horse your looking at, I'd walk away just by seeing those front legs. Its a shame, because I like the rest of him.
Yep....he's got stick legs, and it looks like he was an old injury or swellng on his right back cannon.
 

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They are too fine-boned. Looks to be tied in at the back of the knee too. And the hind leg I can see, the cannon bone is long and lean, again, too fine boned for a barrel prospect.
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I have to agree with you....and his front pasterns are longer and reedier than the back. I mean, there are things I LOVE about him (His length of back, the deep heartgirth to name a few), but for a barrel horse....you have to have the legs for it.
 

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They are too fine-boned. Looks to be tied in at the back of the knee too. And the hind leg I can see, the cannon bone is long and lean, again, too fine boned for a barrel prospect.
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Usually we are in agreement most of the time, but this time I disagree with you.

If the horse's legs are straight and look sound and healthy, I don't mind if they are fine-boned. Possible there might be something going on with that right hind leg as GotaDunQH mentioned, but it could be something created by the picture. Possible he might be a little tied in at the knee, as you mentioned. The horse looks sickle-hocked in back, but it also might be the angle of the picture and how he was standing.

I certainly would at least go take a look at him in person and see how his legs really look. I think he's a nice looking horse. Neck is a tad bit short in comparison to his body, but not bad.

Yes, I would also prefer his hocks to be lower to the ground for barrels, and have his cannon bones a little bit shorter, but that wouldn't entirely turn me off about him. I'd want to see how he moves in person.

My mom has a coming 3-year-old Frenchman's Guy colt. He is VERY fine boned. But dang he's going to be a quick little sucker around those barrels.

And I guess I don't see a huge amount of difference in the horse the OP has asked about, and my old Beau I used to have who was more on the fine-bone side of things. Although maybe not quite as fine boned as the horse the OP is asking about.

 
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I don't mind being a little fine boned. All 3 Of my horses are on the finer side, but to me, this boy is just too much for me. I do really like the rest of him though. My moms gelding has some really solid bone, but to be honest, its hard to find horses that are just built for the long haul. So its hard to find that *perfect* horse, in every aspect.

You have to pick and choose your battles. :)
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Usually we are in agreement most of the time, but this time I disagree with you.

If the horse's legs are straight and look sound and healthy, I don't mind if they are fine-boned. Possible there might be something going on with that right hind leg as GotaDunQH mentioned, but it could be something created by the picture. Possible he might be a little tied in at the knee, as you mentioned. The horse looks sickle-hocked in back, but it also might be the angle of the picture and how he was standing.

I certainly would at least go take a look at him in person and see how his legs really look. I think he's a nice looking horse. Neck is a tad bit short in comparison to his body, but not bad.

Yes, I would also prefer his hocks to be lower to the ground for barrels, and have his cannon bones a little bit shorter, but that wouldn't entirely turn me off about him. I'd want to see how he moves in person.

My mom has a coming 3-year-old Frenchman's Guy colt. He is VERY fine boned. But dang he's going to be a quick little sucker around those barrels.

And I guess I don't see a huge amount of difference in the horse the OP has asked about, and my old Beau I used to have who was more on the fine-bone side of things. Although maybe not quite as fine boned as the horse the OP is asking about.

Fine boned, but still a better set of legs than the one in the OP...especially the back legs and the hocks.
 

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How old is this horse? He looks young, but I was looking at his sire (very nice...stick legs...like father-like son ;-)) very nice pedigree. Then I saw he died in 2004.
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My coming 4yo filly that is strictly barrel bred (eligable for futurities blah blah blah) has small little bones


like look at those little front legs!


and then you look at Squiggs who is a hefty girl...




I prefer a thick bone, but I think that for a horse that isnt going to have the tar rode out of it in a ranching situation (or something similar), a finer bone is acceptable.

I think that bone is a personal preference, a deal breaker or maker for some, and not so much for others.
 
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