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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few questions on rain rot!

If it is very snowy out and I have pasture board, what should I do to avoid it? Would blanketing help? Temperatures are on average like -9 degrees right now... WOW!:shock: I'm not currently boarding, but I'm curious- do boarding facilities naturally put out more hay on cold days/nights so the horses can stay warm, or should someone ask if they were to board?


Thanks for the help, stay warm!!
 

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I have a few questions on rain rot!

If it is very snowy out and I have pasture board, what should I do to avoid it? Would blanketing help? Temperatures are on average like -9 degrees right now... WOW!:shock: I'm not currently boarding, but I'm curious- do boarding facilities naturally put out more hay on cold days/nights so the horses can stay warm, or should someone ask if they were to board?


Thanks for the help, stay warm!!

Is there shelter? Yes, if I boarded the questions concerning feeding and shelter would be addressed. Why would you not ask?
 

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Rain rot's more associated with wet, milder weather conditions which activate the bacteria that lives on the horses skin - sometimes picked up from the soil but usually from a contaminated carrier. Research has shown that that horses can carry the infection without it being present in the land they're kept on
When a horses thick coat gets wet and flattened no oxygen can circulate and it traps the bacteria which behaves like a fungus against the skin and a small scratch or bite then allows it to enter the epidermis and it then spreads and infects
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rain rot's more associated with wet, milder weather conditions which activate the bacteria that lives on the horses skin - sometimes picked up from the soil but usually from a contaminated carrier. Research has shown that that horses can carry the infection without it being present in the land they're kept on
When a horses thick coat gets wet and flattened no oxygen can circulate and it traps the bacteria which behaves like a fungus against the skin and a small scratch or bite then allows it to enter the epidermis and it then spreads and infects
This is exactly what I'm looking for- thank you!
 
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