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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We used to live in Florida and I've never had to deal with extended periods of weather too cold to bathe. He had little bumps on his side when I went out to the barn yesterday. When I parted the coat it looked like rain rot. I want to give him a thorough bath with fungasol but I am not really sure of what precautions I should take.

My options for bathing (there is only cold water at my barn):

- Order a cooler blanket and wait until my next day off to bathe him. Next week it will be in the 50s

- Highs are 72 tomorrow but I get off work at 3:30. It gets dark about 5:30. Bathe him without a cooler in the warmer weather but he would have less time to dry before dark.

Also, any tips for winter grooming? I brushed and brushed yesterday but it doesn't seem to help. Just makes him grey from all the dirt.
 

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I would just trim the hair around the spots and apply veterycin gel because you don't have to rinse it off. I don't usually bath my horse in winter but when I do I use a cooler but rub it so it absorbs a lot of the water. Some fabric stores carry thick terry cloth and I have bought a yard or so of this in the past to use as a giant horse towel. You have to wash it before first use though.

For winter grooming you may need a stiffer brush than normal with the longer hair. I use this https://www.horseloverz.com/product/brushes/171770-legends-dyed-bassine-pocket-sized-mud-brush.html and Cinny really seems to enjoy it in the winter as well as when I use it to get mudd off of his legs. It gets a winter coat pretty dust free and leaves a shine. He does NOT tolerate it in the summer or on his face however.
 

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Leave the skin and hair alone. Rain Rot is only a symptom and it is a complete waste of time to try to treat the scabs and sore skin.

Horses get rain rot, scaly and scruffy skin, goopy and crusty eyes in the winter and spring because they have a Vitamin A deficiency. Once green grass is gone, it does not take long for horses to use up the Vitamin A that has been stored in their livers.

It is much more efficient and a LOT less expensive and bothersome to give a horse sufficient Vitamin A and LET the Horse's immune system clear up the skin and eye problems than treating the problems over and over with all forms of 'cures'.

We have been treating these problems for over 40 years has been to address the Vitamin A problems. We give a horse 5cc of injectable Vitamin A-D but we do NOT inject it. We just squirt it in the horse's mouth like a dewormer. You can get 100cc bottles of Vitamin A-D from any livestock supply place or from a catalog.

Then, you can use a supplement that supplies the Vitamin A that is not in the hay and feed this time of year.

If you start supplying Vitamin A every fall by September, you will NEVER see a case of rain rot. There are several people on this forum that started doing this when I first suggested it and they can tell you that it absolutely works.
 

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Horses get rain rot, scaly and scruffy skin, goopy and crusty eyes in the winter and spring because they have a Vitamin A deficiency. Once green grass is gone, it does not take long for horses to use up the Vitamin A that has been stored in their livers.

It is much more efficient and a LOT less expensive and bothersome to give a horse sufficient Vitamin A and LET the Horse's immune system clear up the skin and eye problems than treating the problems over and over with all forms of 'cures'.
I agree with this to an extent. Prevention is #1! But if they already have it, I think the sores should have some sort of treatment for the horse's comfort while waiting for the vitamin A supplement to kick in and get their immune system working.
 

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They do not need any treatment and will clear up more quickly without intervention. The added Vitamin A will cause them to dry up from the inside and the scabs will just dry up and fall off or brush off. When you mess with the scabs, you increase the chance of an infection, you make them sore and you can make them hate grooming. I have not used any kind of treatment of the scabs and sores since i started using the Vitamin A.

I used to get in visiting broodmares in the spring that had rain rot on their entire backs and rumps. I never treated a single one topically. I just gave them Vitamin A doses weekly until it went away. Without the Vitamin A, they were not going to have a fertile heat cycle either. I just have not found any horses that did not respond to just the Vitamin A.
 

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Cherie is spot on! I prefer to add lots of carrots to their diet rather than a synthesized Vit A but either way rain rot has to be treated from the inside out. And it does work better than anything in the world!
 

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I wouldn't use a fungicide on rain rot. It is an anaerobic infection. Get air to the infection by scratching off small scabs and keeping the hair dry. We had success with a rain rot outbreak at our barn by grooming the horses well, then spraying their coats with 50% diluted yellow Listerine and then brushing the coats out good again.

I've also got my horse on a vitamin supplement and have been feeding lots of carrots. We haven't had skin or eye problems since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all of the suggestions! I am going on the hunt for some vitamin A and today I am bringing out some carrots. I have today off from work and it just so happens to be in the 70s so I am going to bathe him. My friend never returned my fungasol so it will just be regular cowboy magic. I'll feel better than he has a good bath before going into the winter. I decided to clip around the area at last resort since he is not blanketed. Even though it is not a bad case, it is a small spot here and there.

I do have another question. Kind of a "what would you do" type of thing. I moved him to a new barn that I really enjoy. No drama, nice people, extremely close to my house, indoor/outdoor arena, farrier that is there every tuesday and has him on schedule, and he seems a lot happier here than at his old barn. But there are downsides that I'd like to ignore but can't because it is health related. He is in a large pasture with a bunch of cows and other horses. So here they are:

- If he is kept dewormed, will it matter if they are not?
- They have troughs to drink out of but there is a large pond that they drink out of a lot. It was green in the warmer months and I am sure that the cows and geese go to the bathroom in it. Does this pose a huge health threat?
- He is fed sweet feed which he used to be on a while back before he was switched over and does a lot better with the pellets. Can't buy him his own feed because they are fed together. Makes it pretty much impossible if I want to supplement.
- Also, I am not sure how much hay he gets.

I don't want to move him but I feel like I have no choice. All the other pastures are for horses turned in at night and I like to have him turned out 24/7. What would you do? Any other barn will add another 20 mins one way onto my trip so I defiantly won't be able to see him as much. Especially during these months since it gets dark so early.
 

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I'm not sure about some of the questions but as for the supplmenting. My horse used to also be in a group of horses so to supplement him I had to go down and do it myself. I would just mix his supplements in with a small amount of hay pellet (about a cup). He thought he was getting a treat so it wasn't a big deal.

For parasites I did feed through, actually because my horse had a nasty habit of not only eating his own poop, but everybody else's poop too. Actually he still kinda does. I found the feed through kept the parasites down pretty well.
 

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Leave the skin and hair alone. Rain Rot is only a symptom and it is a complete waste of time to try to treat the scabs and sore skin.

Horses get rain rot, scaly and scruffy skin, goopy and crusty eyes in the winter and spring because they have a Vitamin A deficiency. Once green grass is gone, it does not take long for horses to use up the Vitamin A that has been stored in their livers.

It is much more efficient and a LOT less expensive and bothersome to give a horse sufficient Vitamin A and LET the Horse's immune system clear up the skin and eye problems than treating the problems over and over with all forms of 'cures'.

We have been treating these problems for over 40 years has been to address the Vitamin A problems. We give a horse 5cc of injectable Vitamin A-D but we do NOT inject it. We just squirt it in the horse's mouth like a dewormer. You can get 100cc bottles of Vitamin A-D from any livestock supply place or from a catalog.

Then, you can use a supplement that supplies the Vitamin A that is not in the hay and feed this time of year.

If you start supplying Vitamin A every fall by September, you will NEVER see a case of rain rot. There are several people on this forum that started doing this when I first suggested it and they can tell you that it absolutely works.
Cherie how long have you found that it takes for the vit A supplements to make a difference? My mare has pretty persistent rain rot despite all my attempts at topical treatments- wondering if it's the vitamins. I do have her on ShoGlo which I thought would be supplying ample vitamins but maybe she needs more?
 

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Horses need about 100,000 IU of Vitamin A per day. Some poor doers need even more.

The injectable Vitamin A at a rate of 5cc orally once every 8 or 10 days for a month will usually get them in pretty good shape and get their new hair growing growing back in.

The best feedable supplement we have found is Farnam's 'Mare Plus'. It is really a good one because it does not have a high level of the Vitamins that cause a horse to get 'high' and silly.

I have seen some horses look a lot better in a week and other took a month.

Horses' bodies do not know the difference between the 'natural' Vitamin A that comes from Beta Carotene in plants and the synthesized Vitamin A Palmatate. ALL horses absorb the Vitamin A Palmatate. Some older horses and poor doers have a lot more trouble turning Beta Carotene into Vitamin A. These seem to be the same horses that do not store it well either and show signs of a deficiency very soon in the fall instead of late winter. They do much better with with a supplement.
 

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Thanks Cherie- super helpful info :) Farnam is one of the few brands I can get so I'll look into the mare plus- as well as the injectables.... Thanks!
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