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So, I bought a nearly 2 year old horse from a kill pen on September 1st of last year. She is my heart and soul, I love this horse more than any horse I've ever interacted with. She's been super amazing to train and work with. Anyways, she was sold to me as a spotted saddle horse. Ive been researching breeds because she doesn't fit into a ssh, a twh/ssh cross, or a ssh/qh cross. I did stumble upon a breed called the Aegidienberger. After doing some research, she fits the typical breed description 100%. Is it possible I've found this rare of a horse from a ship pen that was about to be sent to slaughter? I have no previous information or papers.
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I agree with what’s said above. Possibly a cross. Do you have more photos?
 
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Cute horse is her lime green booties! Reading that the Aegidienberger horse has no more than 100 individuals at a time in its native Germany, it does seem unlikely that they would have been imported to the US. That certainly does not mean she isn't a cross of Icelandic or Paso and something else. I do think more pictures of her side conformation would help (we all want to see pictures of cute ponies and horses!)
 

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She looks like a grade pony. Is she gaited? A spotted saddle horse can be any breed provided they gait and have pinto coloration. I had a bay pony mare- she was anyone's guess as far as breed. I called her a racking pony, as she was pacey.

I would say spotted saddle is accurate provided that she gaits and doesn't trot.
 

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No. I would say not even highly unlikely. She is exactly what they sold her to you as. Spotted saddle horse is a breed. A fairly recent one. Some type of gaited pinto pony with gaited horse.
 

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No. I would say not even highly unlikely. She is exactly what they sold her to you as. Spotted saddle horse is a breed. A fairly recent one. Some type of gaited pinto pony with gaited horse.
No. I would say not even highly unlikely. She is exactly what they sold her to you as. Spotted saddle horse is a breed. A fairly recent one. Some type of gaited pinto pony with gaited horse.
I know spotted saddle horse is a breed lol Ive had a couple over the years, she just doesn't fit into the ssh category 100%
 

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I think she is part Icelandic, especially if she tölts. I know some people who have half Icies and they often look like this. It looks like she had the broad forehead (a mark of intelligence), thicker/longer than normal hair and fur (not nearly as long as anIcelandic's though), and some proportions that match up. She also likely inherited the awesomeness from her Icelandic ancestors if she has any (they have a special kind of awesome that makes them almost always heart horse status and is very hard to explain. I think it is a mix of intelligence, disposition, and magic).

She has a lot of not Icelandic characteristics also, though. For one, She is much narrower than most Icelandics, who tend to have broad backs and well sprung ribs. Her head is a big long and not as triangular as that of most Icelandics (narrow muzzle + broad forehead), and her eyes are smaller in proportion to her head. Her hears are longer and her nostrils bigger than the norm for Icies, and her legs and hooves don't have as much substance. It is hard to explain, but Icelandics have a very unique look that she doesn't completely possess. Then again, she does have parts of a few traits. Dawn Shaw (FB) may be able to help you genetic test her and see if she has Icelandic ancestry. She has helped many, many people.
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What's more likely? She is some sort of rare, exotic breed from Germany or she is a spotted saddle horse of some type? I think it is highly likely she is a cross of American gaited breeds. Could one also be an Icelandic or Paso? Sure. I really don't see it personally, but sure, she could be a cross of one or both of those breeds. But that still doesn't make her an Aegidienberger (which I had to look up).

I have friends who tell me they think their small grade buckskin gelding (not even dun, but buckskin) is a Kiger Mustang. Sure, I suppose anything is possible, but odds are he's a regular Mustang/grade/QH/whatever mix. If they want to call him a Kiger, sure, if that makes them happy they can do that. But if they go to sell him, whose going to believe that without some sort of documentation?

You don't ride the papers anyway. I've had grades, a BLM Mustang and various registered horses, they all rode great and I loved them just the same. It really doesn't matter unless you are a breeder or showing in some sort of breed shows. And I think spotted saddle horses are way cool! I would LOVE to own one. (I have a MFT). Gaited horses are more fun than a barrel of monkeys no matter what kind you've got!

So the tolt is basically a variation of the rack......my favorite gait. I would love to own a racking horse someday. Sigh.

PS. Is the Spotted Saddle Horse still an open registry? If so, and you can document the gait, you could register her as such.
 

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..........(they have a special kind of awesome that makes them almost always heart horse status and is very hard to explain. I think it is a mix of intelligence, disposition, and magic).
That also describes my Fox Trotter, my BLM Mustang, my Arabians...........

I have no doubt Icies are awesome! But they aren't the only ones with a special mix of intelligence, disposition, magic and heart horse status. ;) I can't imagine a better horse for ME than my current MFT. And the Mustang.......he might have been the best horse I've ever owned (not gaited, but perfect in EVERY other way).

PS. I met a lady with an Icelandic once and I was really impressed with how her horse was built. I've always heard them called (growing up anyway) as Icelandic Ponies. But seeing an Icelandic in person, I could then understand how this "pony" was really like a full sized horse, only short and stout. Built a lot like my Mustang honestly. Really good bone, really good feet, broad but short back, just really a beautiful, solid horse. I wish there were more solid horses like that around. Too many horses nowadays have tiny feet and fine bones set upon a bulky body. I like a horse with legs and feet that can carry them (and me) over many miles of trails. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What's more likely? She is some sort of rare, exotic breed from Germany or she is a spotted saddle horse of some type? I think it is highly likely she is a cross of American gaited breeds. Could one also be an Icelandic or Paso? Sure. I really don't see it personally, but sure, she could be a cross of one or both of those breeds. But that still doesn't make her an Aegidienberger (which I had to look up).

I have friends who tell me they think their small grade buckskin gelding (not even dun, but buckskin) is a Kiger Mustang. Sure, I suppose anything is possible, but odds are he's a regular Mustang/grade/QH/whatever mix. If they want to call him a Kiger, sure, if that makes them happy they can do that. But if they go to sell him, whose going to believe that without some sort of documentation?

You don't ride the papers anyway. I've had grades, a BLM Mustang and various registered horses, they all rode great and I loved them just the same. It really doesn't matter unless you are a breeder or showing in some sort of breed shows. And I think spotted saddle horses are way cool! I would LOVE to own one. (I have a MFT). Gaited horses are more fun than a barrel of monkeys no matter what kind you've got!

So the tolt is basically a variation of the rack......my favorite gait. I would love to own a racking horse someday. Sigh.

PS. Is the Spotted Saddle Horse still an open registry? If so, and you can document the gait, you could register her as such.
As far as I know spotted saddle isn't open registry anymore, I'll have to check again. I'd have her registered as one if so
 

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You can get genetic testing done from Texas A&M. Their results tend to be a little ... esoteric ... from what I've heard, but it might help.
 

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That also describes my Fox Trotter, my BLM Mustang, my Arabians...........

I have no doubt Icies are awesome! But they aren't the only ones with a special mix of intelligence, disposition, magic and heart horse status. ;) I can't imagine a better horse for ME than my current MFT. And the Mustang.......he might have been the best horse I've ever owned (not gaited, but perfect in EVERY other way).

PS. I met a lady with an Icelandic once and I was really impressed with how her horse was built. I've always heard them called (growing up anyway) as Icelandic Ponies. But seeing an Icelandic in person, I could then understand how this "pony" was really like a full sized horse, only short and stout. Built a lot like my Mustang honestly. Really good bone, really good feet, broad but short back, just really a beautiful, solid horse. I wish there were more solid horses like that around. Too many horses nowadays have tiny feet and fine bones set upon a bulky body. I like a horse with legs and feet that can carry them (and me) over many miles of trails. :)
As a breed, they tend to capture people's hearts. I think a big part of this is that they haven't encountered predators as a breed for 1,000 years, so a lot of the flight reflex and nervousness of prey animals has been bred out of them. They are more like dogs than horses. I came out into the pasture one morning and my Icelandic, Kanslari, was licking a coyote and following it around.
 

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As far as I know spotted saddle isn't open registry anymore, I'll have to check again. I'd have her registered as one if so
Years ago......like maybe 10 years ago, I think the SSH registry was open. But I don't know currently. About 10 years ago one of my Fox Trotters (that I had just bought and didn't know she was pregnant) gave birth to a colt and I was looking for a place to register him. He didn't have spots so I couldn't do SSH but I did look around a bit. His sire was a QH but the baby would fox trot. I never found a "legit" registry to register him but that's okay, he's got a new owner that loves him now and he's hitting the trails with the best of them.
 

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If she is a first generation cross then you should see those as 1 and 2. If it came out with the acceptable crosses for that breed as 1 and 2 then you'd have a good idea.
 

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As a breed, they tend to capture people's hearts. I think a big part of this is that they haven't encountered predators as a breed for 1,000 years, so a lot of the flight reflex and nervousness of prey animals has been bred out of them. They are more like dogs than horses. I came out into the pasture one morning and my Icelandic, Kanslari, was licking a coyote and following it around.
Those are good qualities to have! And like I said, I really appreciate their build too. I don't think that comes across in photos like it does when you see one in person.

What is the realistic weight-carrying capacity for an Icelandic? They always say they can carry grown men, but probably not overweight grown men, I would guess. I am a woman, but currently over 200 lbs. :( I doubt I could afford one anyway, but I love gaited horses. That's why I have a MFT and would love to have something that racks someday. My neighbor had a MFT that racks and it's like the best gait I've ever ridden! And she hated it, because he's a MFT and supposed to fox trot, not rack. But the rack was his BEST gait. Such a rush, so smooth, so dreamy!
 

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I am curious as isn't the tolt a lateral 4 beat gait? Same as rack in sSaddlebred, largo in the Paso and running walk in the TWH? All lateral 4 beat gaits.
 
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