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Discussion Starter #1
I have been battling scratches on Harley's legs for about three years now. Seriously, nothing seems to make them go away. He has huge raw patches, summer, winter, doesn't matter. It's not even seasonal anymore. Until just recently.

I am using a different vet who is actually an equine vet (local vets are livestock vets). He comes from out of town and is a lot more $$$ but he cured Harley's chronic diarrhea last spring, and always seems to have new ideas that work. So I had him out to look at Harley and he suggested treating with raw honey and putting him on Omega Alpha's Immune Plus which is a natural herbal supplement. I only had to apply the honey for about 6 days - I would slather it on, cover with a large gauze pad, sometimes two, and use vet wrap to keep everything in place. I would wash his legs, allow them to dry, and change it daily. We have tried everything we could before, from sprays to washes to creams to home remedies without any luck. But WOW, did this ever work!

Here is his leg on August 27th and the same leg today, September 12th, so about two weeks later.
 

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That looks like like what our paint would get in the early summer. Caught him scratching on trees until he’d be almost bleedIng. Maybe we’ll try that next time.
 

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We actually have four beehives on the property so this is our own pure, straight from the hive honey.
I was always told that’s the trick to using honey for anything - it HAS to be local honey. Can’t get much more local than your own farm:cool:

Your new vet sounds to be worth “every stinkin’ rotten penny”, which is my favorite phrase when I get way more than value received for a service or from a product:)
 

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Raw Honey is amazing - I used it when Minnie decided to puncture herself on a tree branch - I've never seen a wound look so well, and heal up so quickly, especially how she had punctured and torn herself.

I may have to look for some local raw honey - Toofine has started getting some patches on his legs and nose that when brushed bleed like crazy and get raw, I'm figuring they are scratches. Before they were always only on his hind legs, and manageable with washing and upkeep, but this is the first time he has bleed and gotten really irritated.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have access to local honey. Some people worry about botulism in raw honey. So... I have to use what they are comfortable with.
If you look at organic farms, they are most likely to have raw, or unpasturized honey or ask if they have any not for human consumption and explain what you want to use it for. Not sure there would be much point in using pasturized honey as the medicinal paft of the honey may be killed off by the heat or chemical processes. You don't actually need that much - just a quarter of a cup will do you several applications.
 

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Is "Omega Alpha's Immune Plus" a liquid? It looks that way from the pictures. How do you administer it? I've never given my guys a liquid supplement or medicine...
 

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I use honey on my cuts as well as the horses. Beekeepers always used it too. Honey can sit in a jar for ages and nothing ever grows in it. Same goes with a cut. If you put honey on it before doing anything else to it, germs and bacteria will never grow in it and it leave either no scar or just a tiny line.

On myself, I put just enough to get inside the cut, then cover it with a bandage to keep from getting honey everywhere. Then I change it a few times and it is amazing how much your skin heals back up as it always leaves little evidence that you have been cut.

Joe my horse got his chest cut somehow. I smeared the honey on his chest, and the hair grew back dark like he had not been in the sun. It was amazing how the hair grew back over the cut.
 

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We actually have four beehives on the property so this is our own pure, straight from the hive honey.
I was already jealous you have your own plot now you tell me this?!!!!! :p I will bear in mind trying honey on her wound. Humans yes, horses no. Will see how it goes. Looks good given the progress in your pics!
 

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I was already jealous you have your own plot now you tell me this?!!!!! :p I will bear in mind trying honey on her wound. Humans yes, horses no. Will see how it goes. Looks good given the progress in your pics!
Remember that when I'm posting pictures of riding in several feet of snow this winter. You'll feel a little less jealous then, guaranteed!
 

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Is "Omega Alpha's Immune Plus" a liquid? It looks that way from the pictures. How do you administer it? I've never given my guys a liquid supplement or medicine...
It is a liquid and I add it to Harley's beet pulp along with his other supplements.
 

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I used Manuka honey on Phoenix when she managed to just about de-glove her leg in what was classed as a "catastrophic leg injury". It was amazing how fast and cleanly the whole wound healed. We now use it on everything and always have a jar aside for injuries - I would never use anything else anymore.
 

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I wish that I had taken a picture of Joes cuts across his chest before I treated with honey. When the cut is deep enough that you see a layer of skin exposed, you expect scars. When I used the honey across his chest, it was hot and the honey would not stay like I wanted it to. But I would smear honey on it twice a day and hoped for the best.

Now, I cannot feel any scar tissue and the hair has grown back completely. For myself and my horses, I would not even consider using anything else on a cut but honey.

I saw an article where the doctors were using honey in surgery for hernia meshes as the area would often become infected. So, if they are putting honey inside of the body to stop infection, that shows the strength of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I wish that I had taken a picture of Joes cuts across his chest before I treated with honey. When the cut is deep enough that you see a layer of skin exposed, you expect scars. When I used the honey across his chest, it was hot and the honey would not stay like I wanted it to. But I would smear honey on it twice a day and hoped for the best.

Now, I cannot feel any scar tissue and the hair has grown back completely. For myself and my horses, I would not even consider using anything else on a cut but honey.

I saw an article where the doctors were using honey in surgery for hernia meshes as the area would often become infected. So, if they are putting honey inside of the body to stop infection, that shows the strength of it.
Did you cover the honey? If not, did it attract a lot of flies (assuming it was during fly season)? I covered the legs, but on a larger wound, I wonder if it would be ok to just leave it on without covering.
 

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The vet noticed some scratches on Otis's hind socks, I thought it was from getting into some alsike clover. I had shaved it, cleaned and put antibiotic cream on it. She said it's a fungus, she gave me a hibitane wash and cream, instructed me to pick off the scabs and wash, treat and wrap. I did that for two days, was getting better. And I read this thread and instead of the cream, I used raw local honey, hubby's dad is a beekeeper. Sorry to say, it got worse. So I went back to the cream she gave me and it is almost gone. I have a feeling though that it wasn't scratches, it was a reaction to the alsike clover.
 
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Acadianartist, when Joe cut his chest, there were about 6 or 7 slashes that showed the skin and what looks like a tiny layer of fat, then the muscle, which was very thin. They were not extremely gaping, but the kind that does leave a scar. It went all the way across his chest, and there was no way I could fix anything that would have stayed over that large of an area.

I can tell you I was sick when I saw it as I could not figure out how he got this. I walked around trying to find what he got into. He is in the fence with my mare, and the only thing I could figure out was she cornered him in rage, and he just scrubbed his chest across it. But it literally looked like someone sliced him with a knife several times.

I have fly spray on him which keeps them off. And I just had to smear the honey the best I could over the wounds. I did not see flies trying to get to the honey beause of the spray or maybe the fans. I never saw the first fly go to the wounds at all.
I actually have never set honey out to see if flies are drawn to it. But maybe the combination of fly spray and honey stopped it.
Joe has the choice to stand in the barn under the fans in a dark area, or go graze in the pasture. Normally he choose the pasture even when it is hot. He seems to go in and out of the shade.

I will check to see if I can still see the dark hair across his chest where it grew back. I was sickened to see him hurt when I did, and knew that it was going to leave a horrible scar across one of the most beautiful parts of a horse. But it turned out just fine.
 

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Rudytoot vet couldn't stitch it?
 
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