The Horse Forum banner

21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
The spurs kept catching my eye. If he's all about soft and forward, why are there white foam marks on the horse's sides where he was constantly nagging them? Also, if you only work a horse long and low all day, how the hell is it suddenly supposed to do collected work in a shorter frame at show time when it isn't used to it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
The spurs kept catching my eye. If he's all about soft and forward, why are there white foam marks on the horse's sides where he was constantly nagging them? Also, if you only work a horse long and low all day, how the hell is it suddenly supposed to do collected work in a shorter frame at show time when it isn't used to it?
I'm not going to comment on the spurs because I didn't pay attention the first time and I don't have time to watch the vid again now.

But how do you come to the conclusion that his only approach to training is "long and low" all day for all horses at all levels?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
But how do you come to the conclusion that his only approach to training is "long and low" all day for all horses at all levels?
At some point in the video, he said his aim was to keep all the horses stretching deep for 90% of their training and that they rarely work them in a competition frame. I don't remember the exact wording he used, but that was the gist of it.

While I'm all for letting them stretch, it's necessary to also work them in the frame they will need to be in to show.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,077 Posts
At some point in the video, he said his aim was to keep all the horses stretching deep for 90% of their training and that they rarely work them in a competition frame. I don't remember the exact wording he used, but that was the gist of it.

While I'm all for letting them stretch, it's necessary to also work them in the frame they will need to be in to show.

I do remember him saying that..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,689 Posts
At some point in the video, he said his aim was to keep all the horses stretching deep for 90% of their training and that they rarely work them in a competition frame. I don't remember the exact wording he used, but that was the gist of it.

While I'm all for letting them stretch, it's necessary to also work them in the frame they will need to be in to show.
Evidently the 10% works for him. In horses, as in much of life, there's more than one way to skin the cat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
Evidently the 10% works for him. In horses, as in much of life, there's more than one way to skin the cat.
Totally agree. I just think this method in the hands of a less experienced trainer would result in a horse using the reins as a 5th leg. I have found ,with my own horse, that there is a fine line between working the horse in a stretching frame on your terms versus the horse asking for the frame so he can lean on the reins. If you don't know how to time your half halts to work the horse out of that mindset, you're in trouble.

I do like the video. I don't know why the spurs kept catching my eye. The horses didn't seem annoyed, but somehow my gut kept telling me I was watching aggressive riding that just looked pretty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I was a working student for him for 2 years and I will admit that yes, I was definitely overhorsed and overmatched for my abilities, but I was never "pushed" into it, and I definitely wouldn't call him "ruthless". I think more of it was that he felt I was a better rider than my confidence allowed me. I also didn't have choices of horses to ride at the barn at the time. Back then he was a younger trainer getting really started in the business and trying to get to upper levels, perhaps pushing too hard. He was very big on long and low, and I don't think that's a bad thing. He's an eventing trainer, so he's not meaning horses need to be long and low 24/7 to do upper level dressage, but most people don't do those basics with the horse, they skip those basic building blocks for a good dressage foundation.

I didn't watch this exact video but I've spent a ton of time watching him ride and his lower leg does have a bit of bounce to it, but he's not constantly spurring the horse forward. It's more of a cupping action I guess? He has always had super effective legs, and since he mostly rides TBs, you can bet he does not actually have his leg spurring them forward every step like that. It's more of an encouraging movement, and being relaxed and supple and sitting the trot, absorbing the bounce and moving WITH the horse every stride. If any of that makes sense lol.

Gypsy Girl, I'm curious when you used to ride there? I worked there around 2000/2001.
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top