The Horse Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, just after some advice.

I have loaned an ex-racer tb for almost 4 years now. I started uni this year (just finished my first year) so havent been riding him as much, but have been back home on summer hols since may so have been riding 3/4 times a week since then. I started schooling him when i got him and he has always been a little tricky to get on to the right canter lead, but when I put down to the fact he hadnt done much schooling in the past (he was 9) and when racing they tend to get a preference for one leg. He did improve and I had some lessons, did a little showing and dressage and most of the time got on the right leg. When I left for uni, his owner moved him to a new yard with a much larger arena with a better surface. I came back every 2/3 weeks and rode him on the weekend and he seemed much better on the new surface. However, since I have been back for summer he has started really struggling to go on the right canter lead, I think its been gradualy getting worse the past 2 months, like if he gets the slightest hint we're going into canter he will go on the wrong leg, and I had a lesson last week and when I finally got the right lead he felt uncomfortable and disconnected (in the past he had settled and relaxed into the canter after a circuit or two). He schools really well in walk and trot in a consistent frame but does tend to drift through his left shoulder on the right rein in trot and is sometimes hard to get on a small circle without drifting (my instructor has said this too) His owner has recently started having lessons on him and has found tis as well (she has always hacked and I have schooled).
As well as this, he has always been a little funy if you girth him up too quickly he doesn't like it and drops down (this happened occasionally though and he has never dropped when being mounted or objected to being mounted or tacked up), but this has definitely gotten worse recently. He has started walking away from you in the stable if he sees you get his boots out. When you put the saddle on he drops down and his back legs go a bit shaky sometimes, not every time but definitely more often than he used to.
He had his saddle checked and re-flocked about a month ago so we know it definitely fits.
We also work him in the pessoa on the long and low setting not tight, and he relaxes in walk and trot, really dropping his head down in trot and canters fine on the left rein but again struggles to get the right leg on the right rein.
We have stopped riding him and have a physio coming out next week (earlies time they could come).

Has anyone seen these symptoms before or have any idea what they could be? And have we made the right decision calling a physio or should it be the vet?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,206 Posts
I think you're doing all of the right things. He may have just grown very stiff in one side over time since it is weaker, and need an adjustment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Get a chiro out and follow up with a massage once to twice a month untill the problem resolves. Sounds like he is really stiff through one side of his body. Does he bend correctly to the right through his head and neck? Sounds like his hips might be out too.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,884 Posts
Hi, I know of an equine body expert who can invariably tell you which state an OTTB ran in(they run diff directions in Vic & NSW) because of the imbalance in their pelvis. Hopefully the physio should be abl to tell you whether it's just some recent soft tissue thing they can fix, or whether it may be a long term/structural/need a chiro type issue.

Of course horses don't like it when you reef a girth up too fast/tight! If the horse actually drops to his knees or nearly(presuming that's what you mean) when you do it, the chances are, you're either being too rough by far, or the saddle or girth are pinching a nerve or such, or possibly the horse has ulcers(common esp for an OTer). Hopefully the physio can work that one out too.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top