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I received a ten year Quarter Horse Mare for free from a friends father in law about a month ago. Except for a small amount of under feeding, a lack of riding and some neglect of her feet she is a great horse. We have been lunging and building muscle that she has lost from just being a pet. I have tried numerous bits her and she pulls and chomps on it. We had one decent two hour ride a couple days ago but she still was unsettled by it. I tried a hackamore and she just went right through it. So this is my solution thus far Im going to have her teeth floated Monday, and ive ordered a bitless bridle, much like nurtural or doctor cook's style. Is there anything else you can suggest?

Another question is there any refreshing training regimen that you have used successfully on a horse much in my situation?

Another note is this horse is really friendly, seeks out my attention and comes when I call her. Theres still a little hesitation but were moving along quickly in our bonding.
 

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The problem may be purely with her teeth - I wouldn't switch to the hackamore but would hope to go with a snaffle after the dentist has been.

Hopefully then she will be comfortable in her mouth, and you can start afresh. I would be inclined to start very very gently with tiny transitions that teach her that you are a rider with soft hands, and soft legs. Let her re-learnt that she doesn't have to fight.
 
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There's kind of a standard formula you can apply to your situation: First, make sure she is not in pain (eg bad teeth, sore back, etc.). Second make sure the tack is fitted properly and is comfortable. Third start looking for deficiencies in her training - typically this is done much like starting a new horse where you ensure that each phase or step is mastered before moving on to the next. Somewhere in here you will find the reason why she is running through the bit, however finding that cause and correcting it will require a mixture of patience, skill and planning. If you are on the inexperienced side of riding that will present a challenge. This challenge is met and passed by upping your knowledge level in a hurry or hiring a trainer who can help you retrain, give you lessons or a combination of both.
 

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There's kind of a standard formula you can apply to your situation: First, make sure she is not in pain (eg bad teeth, sore back, etc.). Second make sure the tack is fitted properly and is comfortable. Third start looking for deficiencies in her training....
Chevaux had a really good post and spelled out the steps really well. YOu are getting step one taken care of so we can check that off, when I was reading your post the first two things I was thinking was teeth, and bridle fit. I am not a big believer in the idea that "my horse doesn't like" this bit or that bit, horse are trained to except what is given to them now that being said some horses work better in this bit or that bit or no bit, but I don't know that your horse or you are at the point that you can truly said this bit is wrong for my horse. I make sure the bridle is fitted right, then I would start working with the horse. Teach your horse to except the bit don't keep switching from bit to bit hoping to make you horse happy.
 

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It's not as simple of putting a bitless bridle on a horse and it working. Horses are trained to respond to bit pressure. If you want to ride bitless you need to train them to respond well to that. Be aware that any control you have, through the bit or somewhere else is only training.

You might find she's fine after the dentist. However I'd still keep with a bit. I like the double jointed snaffle bits, some horses find thick ones too much, so consider a thinner one. If she's mouthy, I'd give it a little time to get her to adjust to it.

I'd work on the ground a bit too, so getting her doing basic lunging, I just do mine on a 12ft rope, but I teach my horse to walk, trot and halt in each direction. Get her to yield her hind and fore, yield to the side, back well - all to minimal pressure.

Riding I'd do lots of circles and transitions.
 
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