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The way he moves, he almost looks mildly laminitic. Did the trimmer mention anything about this? Or has a vet seen him?
I thought so too, he is quite cresty, but I am not to familiar with draft breeds. I am convinced this a PMU baby given her location. Anyways, glad to see you bond with him.
 

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There's a cheap poultice that works well I know main ingredient is soap and possibly salt over thick pads often maternity ones then all sealed with duct tape to be left on for about 2/ 3 days at the max
 

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He is such a cutie. I used to lease a Percheron before I got my little rescue (whom I was terrified of at one point and he is only 14.3) anyhoo Duke was 17 hh and a big old doll. I love the temperment of the draft. With more respect on the ground you will get more respect in the saddle. He knows he can get away with doing what he wants, has anyone with experience tried to ride him? Keep us updated, glad you kept him. I almost traded away Hunter as I was in over my head (and I have horse experience) thankfully I have a good friend who is my farrier / trainer and she helped me work with him and now we have a much better respect ratio.
 

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Do not release him and let him return to the food when he is misbehaving! Pulling on the halter will only make him brace and pull back. There are many ways to make him move forward. Have an experienced person show you how to move his hindquarters away from you. Then circle out. Also if you pull diagonally it is harder for the horse to resist than pulling straight forward. Use several short tugs rather than a constant pull.
 

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I wouldn't recommend that actually ^ To get a horse to move forward you use a constant pressure and when he walks a step forward release completely! If he doesn't walk forward, increase the pressure and keep it until he walks forward. That works for a lot of horses. I'll see if I can find some videos for you.
 

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I'll see if I can simplify some things...

For ground work to be complete for a horse, the horse needs to know how to:

Sensitizing:

- Move forward

- Back up

- Move his front end

- Move his back end

- Move his whole body sideways

- Picking up his feet

- Bending/flexing laterally, as well as vertically

All this is called sensitizing. Your horse needs to know how to be sensitive and desensitive.

Desensitizing is:

- Not being spooky at silly things (Such as simple things like tarps, whips, tack, things on the ground)

- Standing while having a rope fly over his back, /whip, a saddle accidently sliping, loud noises, things on his body/head.

- Easily allowing people to touch him anywhere (Rump, legs)

He must do all this willingly and happily. (I may have forgotten or left something out, feel free to add anything)
 

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I also recommend Clinton Anderson for more groundwork as well as under-saddle. Try putting tack on him and see how well he responds, some horses just don't respond well to just halter pressure (My mare doesn't).
 

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I'm so glad you kept him :D He's such a cute boy and sounds like he'll make a great first horse for you!

Cresty is normal for draft horses- check out Smrobs pics of her Percheron gelding in this thread: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/my-vet-confusing-me-about-eponas-91232/page3/

I don't know about the walk looking laminitic... the farrier should be able to spot that pretty easily, though.

Being stubborn is just as much bad behavior as horses who buck (though less dangerous, thankfully), and I think it's actually harder to deal with. My horse, Woody, can have the same "I don't have to do it and you can't make me" attitude sometimes. I'm lucky enough to know someone at my barn who is very good with horsemanship who is nice enough to help me out when I encounter problems (like getting Woody across a wooden "bridge") You really have to have a good feel for how much pressure you have to apply to a horse and when to release it or you end up re-confirming to your horse that eventually you'll just give up and he just has to wait you out.

I definitely agree that starting out with some solid ground work is the best way to go. Once you have him moving for you on the ground it'll be a lot easier mounted!
 

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Discussion Starter #49
I see in that video that he is using a stick to help him with the horse, I've seen that in other videos too - maybe that would also be a good idea to give me some extra reach, tap his feet, etc.

Can anyone see any reason I can't just run out to a hardware store, buy a 3 foot stick/pole, and wrap one end in electric tape? Not fancy but this is something I could do in 5 minutes, and might be really useful - any tips for making my own training stick?
 

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Glad you are keeping him. A quiet horse like him will help you gain confidence quickly and boarding with others will help you learn much faster than anything you can learn on a forum on the internet
 

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I see in that video that he is using a stick to help him with the horse, I've seen that in other videos too - maybe that would also be a good idea to give me some extra reach, tap his feet, etc.

Can anyone see any reason I can't just run out to a hardware store, buy a 3 foot stick/pole, and wrap one end in electric tape? Not fancy but this is something I could do in 5 minutes, and might be really useful - any tips for making my own training stick?
I'm glad you kept him also, I'm sure once you get his respect everything will fall into place.
As for the training stick, I don't know about making one, but I bought mine here for probably only a little more then it would cost to make one and I've been very happy with it Training Stick with String - Sticks \
They also have rope halters, which I have one of also. Also much cheaper then the trainers brands but I find then comparable. Firm Polyester Halter Cord
 

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Somebody told me once where you could buy fiberglass tubes like that but I don't remember where anymore. Don't snowplow/dumptrucks have tubes like that on the edges of their front bumpers?
KeroKero don't get anything that will break or splinter like a wooden dowell (sp?)
A lady who leased one of my horses a while back found a complete stick with string for $10 at a trade show during a horse-type event around here, don't recall whether fair, equine affair, Congress or other big show.
 

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I agree, personally I like a dressage whip because it is lighter than a stick would be and has a bend to it. You could also buy a lounge whip or a cheap knock off of the training stick like posted ^
 

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Awww glad you're keeping him!! :) I too rescued my mare and was a "newbie" a short 2 1/2 years ago (I've been riding for 4 1/2 years now, was never around horses before then but always loved them and wanted one)! When I got my mare, I had been taking lessons for about 2 years and had half leased my trainer's horse for a few months. I also made sure I had a great network of friends at my barn to help me, knowledgeable trainer, and a great BO! Then I set out and absorbed any info I could on horses in general, training (my horse was also green broke when I got her!), health, grooming, etc etc. Subscribe to a few magazines if you don't already - I have learned a TON of Equus, Horse Illustrated, and Practical Horseman! I have also been a big fan of searching the web, asking questions on forums like this, and reading LOTS of horsey books either from my local library or from the book store.

You'll learn a LOT and you'll find that you'll never STOP learning, but it is definitely possible for a greenie to train/learn with another greenie, as long as the horse is safe and willing which it sounds like he is :) Ask lots of questions and learn from many...you'll find that there are a TON of opinions in the horse world and that not every bit of advice is going to work for you/your horse. They're individuals just like us and there are no such things as general blanket statements in the horse world, trust me on that one!

Good luck with your new endeavor and we're all here for you to pick our brains!
 

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Congratulations on your new horse! It can be very overwhelming however I agree with gigem88 you need to find a good trainer that can help you. When you find a really good trainer you can work with it is like finding gold...he or she will help you so much...I am speaking from experience.
 

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I just saw the "Buck" documentary and he said in it, "the average person can be excellent with horses"...or something of that nature anyway....don't quote me :)
I am new to horses too and am loving every new learning experience! I am so happy for you, he looks fabulous. I am sure you will do great with him.
 

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wow hes a total cutie pie. He looks like he was left a stallion for a long time tho.
Hopefully he is not proud cut... I'm sure that you will have NO trouble finding him a good home. hes a doll baby and since my computer is out and i can't read the last two pages of replies did you think of trying to rent a pasture space for him in the summer that might be closer to home? i'm sure with the cold Canadian winters you'd want a stall but in the winter but you might be able to find someone with a small acreage that will allow you to keep him on pasture a lot cheaper than in a stall at a barn. well hope all goes well whatever happens :)
 

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ok computer just came back on after the storm LOL I see that you have decided to keep him. bravo. i think things will work out for you just read alot research alot and don't be afraid to ask questions. there are many helpful folks around here that are always willing to help a fellow horsey person.

you might be able to find a trainer that would come out once or twice a month and give you and your horse both lessons and homework to work on until next time.

EBAY is THE greatest place to go for used tack as they have a lot of stuff for pretty cheap prices. I know they have specific draft horse tack too. good luch and please keep us posted on how he does. i think he is GORGEOUS BTW :)

OH and PS I think a horse that big is intimidating to almost everyone. i was raised with Arabians that are generally smallish like 13hh to 14.2hh and when i got my big Warmblood gelding HE TOTALLY INTIMATED ME. Norman is 17hh just the size of a guy that big is a little scary, but now I'm used to him and we get along great everything is fine and i LOVE having a big horse :)
 
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