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My friend gave me a horse to train, her family dont like him in the least bit. I rode him yesterday, and he has an issue with taking the bit. He came from the track, but only did 2 races and never made it because he was not quite fast enough. He is now 11 years old, and I love him...

But does anyone kno how to teach him to chill out and listen??

I am willing to train him for anything western that he might like, I was thinking cutting, but now I am kinda leaning twords barrels. any ideas??
 

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Find a trainer. Don't try to do it yourself.
 

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I agree, "chill out and listen" could mean way too many things, call a professional. The horse will benefit from the hands of a skilled horseperson!
 

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Find a trainer. Don't try to do it yourself.
I agree.

I have trained a few horses myself, your typical; 2 year old, old horse that was never started, your average 'problem' horse, a few foals...ect

One thing I did in common with all these horses: I had a professional working with me.
I enjoy doing all the work myself from cleaning stalls to what some consider all the boring bending and softening work (usually everyone wants to get right out and jump, barrel race, and so on).... Sometimes once a week, other times once a month just to have another eye on what needs to be improved and has already improved.

My newest horse I'd like to really get involved in the ApHC with and show... I'm going to need a lot of professional help with him. He is just a cheap little thing that was given to me so its going to take a ton of time, money, and hard work to get there... even then he may not be very good at anything but I'm willing to devote myself to him becuase in the end he will just be a better broke horse becuase of it... BUT I still am going to work with a trainer that is proven in my area and has shown in ApHC, APHA, and AQHA events, as well as many local shows, and her students are winning in the events (and others) that I wish to compete in.

Nothing is more relaxing than having a professional to help you along, watch you work, and guide you down the right paths... and nothing is more frustrating than making very little progress and trying to do everything on your own with no expereince!

You have to work with and ride a ton of horses before you can do it alone. :wink:
 

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If you really can't get hold of a trainer, do atleast 10 - 15 minutes of join up a day (even if he locks on straight away, keep him going on the outside for this amount of time, do both directions too) this will get him listening to your body language (I'm sorry if you already know this, and you probably do! But to work out a kink you need to start right from the very beginning)
After every join up, try and get follow up too, that shows the horse repects you.
Thoroughbreds are very sensitive (I assume he is a Tb cos you said he was from the tracks). They're bred to run, which is why I think he is so uptight. I did some work with an OTTB gelding, who was, incidently 11 too, but certainly didn't seem it. His owner bought him as a dressage / family horse. Bad idea I'm afraid. He was such a sweet horse, but all he wanted to do was gallop. And as far as dressage go, he had such a boucny trot and canter, never ever seemed to flow.
The horse you are working with might be different, but like I said, they only seem to be interested in running.
Good luck with him by the way, and I'm sorry if my post has been absolutely NO help lol
 

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Annie came from the track too. I was doing the classic "woah sit reins" technique to work on her stopping and when she got away I used the one rein stop to pull her around and make he listen. She soon had the idea after a while, and then I sent he to a trainer for 30 days of touchup,
 

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You say he is 11. Only ran 2 races...

A horse that only ran 2 races and is 11 has most likely been off the track for years. So what has he done since then? Just sat in a pasture? Was he owned by someone else after racing? Need more info about his training after racing.

Most race horses aren't trained to do much but change leads, and run straight.

I agree get help from a professional trainer, as from the sound of things he is still green (even at 11), and hasn't been ridden in years. So your basically breaking a horse at the age of 11. Not an easy task for a novice horse person.

IMO some professional help in this situation is your best bet
 

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Hello
I have to agree with the many posters above.

Maverick took the words right out of my mouth! I was wondering the same thing...."what has this horse been doing for all those years"?

The horse could have lots of "baggage" to get worked out.

I would start calling around and trying to find someone who has experience with a situation like this. You might want to ask lots of questions about the person training history and ask the same questions to more than one of them.

Also, Just a thought. Are you tensing up while on this horses back? This can contribute to many things.
I don't your your experience with horse's or training them nor do I know your age, but I do feel everyone is on the right track with suggesting you find some professional help.
HP
 

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Yes, I didn't mean don't get a trainer by the way hehe, I just meant, in some areas getting hold of a pro is very difficult, so I was just taking into account that that might not be possible. But if you can, you should deffinitely get the help of someone who has worked with lots of different horses, and it sounds like you'll need one if he's still so green at 11.

Just remember as Tbs have arab in them, they are very sensitive to pressure, both physical and visual. So just be aware of what all of your body is doing (which I admit can be a difficult when you're trying to concentrate on what your horse is doing)

Also, has he ever been in western tack? He might not be used to the feel on his back, if he's only really been used in races, then he's used to a very thin, light saddle that doesn't go as far down his back as a westen one would.
 

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Just remember as Tbs have arab in them, they are very sensitive to pressure, both physical and visual.

Arab has nothing to do with it. Thourobreds haven't had arab crosses for 200 years. They are horses and that is why they are sensitive.
 

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Agreed^^ I hate when people make vague excuses for them like that... When really the Arab is so bred out of them by now it does not matter. Not to mention that stereotypes are bull poo, not all arabs are hot and sensitive...
 

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Wow, that was kind of snappy. I'm only saying, that both arabs and thoroughbreds are typically sensitive. I understand all horses are sensitive, I'm not a complete moron, believe it or not. Tbs and Arabs are just more sensitive, it's not just bull, they're known to be more sensitive, that's all I was putting accross.
 

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I didn't mean that snappy, I just honestly hate it... sorry if I came off mean, happening a lot lately... gah...lol
 

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sorry, I keep taking things to heart lately (too much work at work and college... well that's my excuse anyway!) sorry, I didn't mean to be rude, I just take things to heart lately, ignor me LOL I'm just so used to my tough-as-boots Gypsy Vanner, when it comes to working with Tbs, you can see the difference... a lot! And, although I haven't worked with arabs directly, I know a lot of people with them, and they always say, compared to previous horses they've owned, they are far more sensitive. I'm not saying they all are, but there just seems to be a pattern, maybe cos they're bred to be runners... I have no idea, I've just noticed they can be twitchy and more sensitive.
 

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Tbs are more flighty natured then other breeds. Its a simple fact. Not all but for the most part they are alot more strung out...thats why they use them for racing.
 

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Tbs are more flighty natured then other breeds. Its a simple fact. Not all but for the most part they are alot more strung out...thats why they use them for racing.
How many TB's have you been around? All the TB's I have ridden are pretty mellow unless they are hopped up on feed like those that are being raced but that is the same for any lhorse that is stalled and fed very high energy feed.
 

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Tbs are more flighty natured then other breeds. Its a simple fact. Not all but for the most part they are alot more strung out...thats why they use them for racing.

This is completely false....I have to agree with kevin, I actually own an OTTB, and unless he's had a couple days in and its cold or windy out, he's pretty mellow. You would never think he spent eight years running as fast as he possibly could.

They use Thoroughbred because they were bred to be athletic....they have the stamina, deep chests and lungs that allow for breathing correctly during running, and big hearts that pump blood fast enough. TB's are also incredibly willing and very smart, they are a breed that strives to please its owner/rider to the best of their ability.....not saying other horses don't, but I don't know a lot of other breeds that would actually run until their heart explodes just because someone is telling them to.
 

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How many TB's have you been around? All the TB's I have ridden are pretty mellow unless they are hopped up on feed like those that are being raced but that is the same for any lhorse that is stalled and fed very high energy feed.
I would agree. My brother has his first full-sized horse who is a 6 y/o TB gelding. You can run him as fast as he can go, drop the reains, and he'll just do a good slow dog walk on.
 

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How many TB's have you been around? All the TB's I have ridden are pretty mellow unless they are hopped up on feed like those that are being raced but that is the same for any lhorse that is stalled and fed very high energy feed.
This is completely false....I have to agree with kevin, I actually own an OTTB, and unless he's had a couple days in and its cold or windy out, he's pretty mellow. You would never think he spent eight years running as fast as he possibly could.
I would agree. My brother has his first full-sized horse who is a 6 y/o TB gelding. You can run him as fast as he can go, drop the reains, and he'll just do a good slow dog walk on.
exactly.
 
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