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Discussion Starter #1
I had an old friend that is long gone now and would share tips about riding with me from time to time.
He used to say "son you got to ride to in between" and at the time I had a real hard time understanding what he was trying to say to me.

I got into a conversation with a young student the other day about lead departures (she is 12) and she is doing pretty good on one of my mares.
Now I have this whole thing about keeping the horse evenly loaded in a straight line and getting the horse to track straight with a straight spine and even foot falls.
Well she keeps getting the horse a little sideways after she gets the lead and the horse starts to drift.

So to counter the drift,she starts putting more leg on the horse to keep it from drifting in that direction.

The horse takes the cue of more leg to mean that it was supposed to go faster.

She counters that with pulling back to slow the horse down.

The mare gives pretty well and over-flexes on the bit past the vertical.

So this little girl get her departure just fine, then goes galloping past me,too fast and sideways,bent to the left,on the right lead,over-flexed and all bunched up,getting ready to buck.

I said to her as she reported back in for my review about the run.

Darlin, You got to ride the in between.
 

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I like that!! It's feel, timing and balance but when you you say ride the in between it makes it much less intimidating.
 

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I like that!! It's feel, timing and balance but when you you say ride the in between it makes it much less intimidating.
Actually I find it the opposite, I find it very intimidating! All I have is thirty years *gulp* of riding horses and not falling off for the most part. I have never had any kind of riding tuition in my life, infact it has only been the last two years that I have had a group of riding companions to bounce ideas off. I have read ALOT of horse books through out my entire riding history, from when I was a young girl I lived and breathed horses and buried myself in horse books.

I would love to have had a mentor but never have so have muddled along as best I could. I don't know if I ride the in between, hell I don't even know if I ride the inside or outside.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think my old friend was just trying to say that you have to be in the moment and do the best you can to stay WITH the horse and not let yourself get so behind that you are just a passenger.
To try to know what is about to happen and deal with with it.

He had a lot of little sayings that I am still trying to figure out.
 

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A common error in the learning process. After a new rider completes a maneuver, they stop riding. What we used to tell them was that they needed to keep riding their horse before, during, and after. That the lead change was only the middle of the maneuver.
 

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I like that.

A couple of years ago I started taking weekly lessons on hubby's horse. Hubby is on the road so much that Kooter was becoming a couch potato and he was only 10. Kooter was well trained, but one of those horse's that had done a lot of things but nothing for any length of time.

I've done years of lessons off and on with my older horse, but Kooter is a lot more sensitive to aids than his brother. What you describing Marecare was exactly what was happening to me. So, call in some help........the young lady I take lessons from watched me ride for all of about 2 minutes and then said put him into the gait you want and then leave him alone.......if you need to do an adjustment then do it and go back to leaving him alone. I was so busy trying to correct one thing that I was causing him to think he needed to do something else. All I was ending up with was a domino effect.
 

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You got to let it flow!! If you focus on all the cues individually you overcorrect. Lighten up and let it flow!!
Ahhhhhh! I get what you mean! Yes, it is knowing that your horse is where he is meant to be right now but also feeling where he is going to be next. I know what I am talking about I just suck at trying to explain.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When I ride I call it, Moments of brilliance followed by large quantities of mediocrity.

I got!,oh no I lost it,oh,oh I think I am getting it......where did it go?
 

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When I ride I call it, Moments of brilliance followed by large quantities of mediocrity.

I got!,oh no I lost it,oh,oh I think I am getting it......where did it go?
My personal favourite: How did you do that?! Dunno, not sure. Could you do it again?! Ummm dunno, not sure.
 

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NICE!! Seems that brilliance always comes when we least expect it and then we spend hours lookin for it again--it comes again when we least expect it--repeat.
 

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Hmmmmm........ Ok, I'm a tad bit confused at the moment, I'm reading mixed things here. For years, I always got stuck in the place of being able to get on anything and ride it and ride it well, but the horses owner still couldn't make it walk in a straight line. I "rode the inbetween" to the point where whatever was about to happen was corrected before it had the chance to happen, which is what I believe we want to be able to accomplish in the rider.
However, I also understand G & K's comment. About allowing the horse to find its own self carriage and only assisting to establish the balance to help the horse to sustain its own balance even when the new rider on board has none. This is done by correcting and staying out of the way and repeating in a timely enough manner that the horse is able to put the correction with the action, sometimes requiring the rider to manipulate their weight in order to change the weight distribution with each of the horse's legs.

So, where is the priority? Building the rider, or building the horse? If we teach the rider to aide the horse too much, then the horse doesn't truly own its self-carriage techniques, but if the horse is truly skilled its its travel, then it doesn't give the rider the chance to learn to ride. I guess the goal would be to build the rider to build the horse, with the optimal goal that once the rider did their job, the horse would be so consistent that the rider's aides are no longer needed and they can actually just enjoy the ride. The reward to their work being the result of their own sweat and tears? I think I think too much......
 
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