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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have mild cerebral palsy and I ride.ive been ridding for 5 years now and Im Going to be ridding at a new place.ive worked my tail off to get to where I am.my stance is its none of their business and to not disclose it.if they can tell and ask fine if not then they don't.my friend on the other hand thinks I should tell.
What do you think?
 

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I would probably tell. It's nothing to be ashamed of. I just think in order for them to be able to guide you, they may need to take this into consideration. They may want to get "smart" about it as well. They are going to need to know what your muscles can and can't do and if you have any joint involvement or learning disabilities that may go with it. I see nothing wrong with you sharing that information.

Are you worried they will treat you differently?
 
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I personally would tell them. If you withhold that information from them, you may not be covered by their insurance.

CP is nothing to be ashamed of, and if they make you feel like you shouldn't have told them, well they need more education.
 

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I get this, because I have MS. It's in remission so you can't tell anything is wrong from just watching me move. I don't like to tell people because a lot of times people freak out and start acting weird if they know.

I didn't tell my trainer for a long time, and then it only came up because the heat just slays me, so I needed to get my lessons very early in the day during the summer.

I'd say, be brutally honest with yourself about whether you have any balance issues, or you have any spasticity that affects your seat or your hands. If you do, it's a good idea to tell your trainer so that you can get matched up with a horse that will work with your body. You should also check your perceptions with someone who knows you really well and will give you an honest opinion - I'm so used to dealing with the stuff from the MS that I truly don't even notice when minor stuff crops up, but my husband sure does.

If you are having zero balance problems or issues with tightness anywhere in your seat, and you can ride with fully relaxed hands, then no, I don't see why you should say anything about it unless you want to.
 

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It must be VERY mild for them to not notice something is different but if you don't want to tell them then don't. It may help them accept you if they know rather than gossip behind your back when they see something that's not quite right (for lack of a better term).

On another note I'd like to hear more about your experience as a rider. How do your horses fill in for you? What challenges do you have? You may want to start another thread though. Or feel free to completely ignore me!!
 
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I'd tell them if they find out you were hiding it ot will hurt their trust level with you ore then if you twll them out right, just explain that it's very mild and you can ride as well as anyone else
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
my old trainer could tell when i didn't stretch.Im not ashamed its more them treating me like less of a rider than i am.i lean to the right when i ride and i have to be conscious of my leg when jumping because they love to go back.I have the most amazing canter seat and my legs hardly move though.i have to work 2 times as hard as normal girls do at times.i ride better with no stirrups than i do with them but its hard work.my seat is stable but i would love to be able to walk trot canter no struups without worrying about falling off,I'm hoping to find a trainer who will do a lot of lunge line work with me.
 

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I'd explain to your new trainer exactly what you just said. If you had come to me for lessons and not told me I would be livid! Not only would it explains issues you have but for liability reasons you trainer may need to know.

If you have a decent trainer they should be able to be discrete
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Its always a good idea to be as upfront as possible with a new trainer. The good ones will be more then respectful of your privacy, but having the info you already posted here is a big big help to a trainer. Knowing what your weak points are, and in this case why, can only be of help when working on riding.
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Everyone at my barn who either needs to know or has seen me crippled at some point knows about my APS. As for the rest of them? I wouldn't care one way or the other, but I'd just as soon tell them if it came up. The reason I don't tout it is because I don't want sympathy. I still feel like a normal person 100% of the time, that person just happens to move like a 90 year old sometimes lol :lol:
 

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I am also disabled. I have Lupus (with siezures), manic depressive bipolar (and everything that goes with it) and previously 2 fractured vertebre and 1 shattered vertebre. It is good to tell because alot of people will respect you as a rider more so for having to work so hard, on the worse end of it they could also treat you as if your going to break the second the horse makes a wrong stride. Boths ways have reward so to speak but both also have drawbacks. I hope this helps :) Im sorry if i covered something that has already been covered, I didnt read thru all the posts.
 

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You should really tell. It will help the instructor to know of any disabilities and to teach accordingly.

I have done a lot of teaching with disabled people and have never let anything get in the way of helping the rider to learn.
My attitude is that if a person gets to the horse unaided, whether in a wheelchair, on sticks or crawls, then there is no reason why they cannot ride as an able bodied person.
 

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When I take up riding I am going to inform my instructor of
my disability and go from there
I really want to ride again and since I have a balance issue i am wondering if a sturdy mounting block would be better than the EZ stirrup
 
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