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Hi,
Just wondering if anyone can help. Has anyone ever experienced having a supposed gelding in their horse's field only to find out that it was a rig and never has been gelded and has been in a field with mares (a year and a half down the line? What are the chances of a rig producing? Can they produce before their testicles descend? I have so many questions and i can't seem to find much online before the vet gets out to see them. As you can imagine it's quite worrying to only just find out after all this time that a rig has been in a field with your mares. I didn't want my mares in foal, especially with one being an older girl but I'm not sure if much can be done now.
 

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That all depends on whether there is a descended testicle or where they are located. If in the abdomen then no. The closer to the outside of the body the more of a chance there are surviving sperm.

How do you know he is a rig? Age?
 

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What is a rig?
The term I have always heard is risling, but many call them a ridgling. All the same as a cryptorchid or a horse with either one or both testes not descended.

Rig is new to me too.
 

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Chances of a rig producing would be slim to none depending. If vet is coming out, you can always find out. Geldings can act like a stud around mares though.
 

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As you're saying that you've found out that the horse is a Rig (a term mostly used in the UK, the OP is based in the UK), I'm assuming that the horse has by now been seen by a Vet and confirmed as a Rig?
Technically, the horse is a stallion, although the testicles/testicle are/isn't visible, they're still producing testosterone, so they will behave like a stallion and they can be fertile.

I would certainly have your mare checked out.

Rigs can be as difficult to handle as a badly trained stallion and if in with mares, can be aggressive and unpredictable in their attitude towards humans. The horse shouldn't be in with mares or in a field that has to be accessed by people who don't own it or have some responsibility for caring for it.

They can be castrated, it isn't the same simple operation as a normal castration, but it can and should be done if the horse is to have a normal life.
 

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Is the suspected horse yours?
If so, you can have a hormone test done to find out his exact status.
Does he have anything visible at all?
 

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I think it depends if one testicle is descended, or none have descended. If one is down then yes the horse can reproduce. People can remove the one testicle that comes down and still have a "stallion" except he would be infertile.

Sperm don't like warm temperatures within the body cavity.

I don't know why but the only crypts I have met have all been worse behaved than most stallions. Perhaps lack of training or maybe it causes a hormonal imbalance.
 

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I used one for a teaser horse. He NEVER serviced a mare. Made a good teaser tho. Even tho he was only handled a few times in the year, he had a good mind. He was no different than any other horse. I never saw any of what folks speak about when talking about a risling. He was just another horse. I handled him probably more than anyone else.
If you didn't look under him, you would never know he only had one down.

Made a good teaser horse tho.
 

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Gelding a risling can be tricky.

The testes form up above the kidneys, then travel down and eventually (hopefully) end up on the scrotum. Sometimes, one or both, wont make the complete trip. Then you end up with a risling (rig, crypt or whatever you choose to call it).
Surgery is your only option. But, since it's very invasive, many will choose not to do it.
As in my case, I bred a mare to an outside stallion, very well bred horse, but was not happy with the resulting foal at all. So, I turned a negative, into a positive, and used him for a teaser. Many will either find a risling to use, or they will use a pony for a teaser.
Mine had his own corral in front so when the mares came in to water, he was handy for them to come visit, and easy for me to observe who was doing what. As I said before, he was good minded. He was actually a very well bred horse! But he had a problem. It did work out well for me, as I did need a teaser.

This is where it got strange tho. He was a black horse. I was totally blown away at how many people would come to see horses looking for a prospect, or looking to breed, see him out in front and color was all they could see. "I want to breed to that horse!!" All because he was black. They never looked at his conformation, nothing, just color. We found out later that the particular stallion he was by, sired a lot of crooked legged horses, and Buzz was one of them. I had other foals out of his dam, and all were correct, and then there was Buzz.

I have been around a few rislings, and none had the disposition that the myth is so fond of. They were all just horses. I have never seen one that was a raging alligator like you hear about.
 

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It is more about the level of exposure to hormones in utero. My most "stallion like fire breathing dragon" was a colt that I had gelded at 3 months. I'd hate to see how he would have been had we waited and his hormones kicked in on top of that. He ran a tighter herd than any of the three stallions I had at the time and was also the most aggressive horse I had at the time. His mother though sweet and docile as she is must have had a massive overload of hormones during pregnancy. Even her daughters were stallion like. That one though was extreme.

I'm going to say that if a horse is assumed to be a gelding that people (g) have a different set of expectations and way of handling. They slide on behavior and create their own monsters then blame it on the hormones when it is a failure of the handler.
 
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I used to ride with someone who had a rig. The people in my neighborhood have a very good vet who goes inside and gets the undescended testicle for a reasonable price. She really started looking into having it done. It was going to be pretty pricey. She decided that her rig was so well behaved, and she really didn't have any trouble with him, so she'd just get along with what she had. She had to be a little more careful with him than if she had had a gelding . . . and she was.
 
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