The Horse Forum banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Thank you very much! I will try those :)
I spam with this link LOL, I really enjoy these videos - there's some discussion about ringbone in this particular video, and some nice free yoga exercises on that youtbue channel that you and your horse might like: https://www.youtube.com/user/HolisticHorseWorks#g/u If anything, some stretches may help prevent further damage, you never know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
My vet said the previcox would not work on that area.

I am going to try trimming him with rounded hoofs and see how he does.

He has had a head bob for quite a while, probably since I have gotten him. He has no sign of pain really, so I am just going to wait 2 more weeks and see if the previcox does help. He has only been on it for 20 days as of now and it has helped his hocks dramatically.

She has not taken radiographs or anything, so she just assumed.
I have a horse currently with advanced ringbone. Unfortunately this week the vet is coming out to see if it is finally his time to retire because he won't stay sound. This can be something very serious, or something that doesn't bother them after a long time off, from what I have found out. I'm in the process of trying to determine which one my boy has.

If you vet said they think it is ringbone, I highly doubt they would be wrong. It is rather easy to detect and the questionable part is about where it is located and fused to and how much it affects their joints. It is easy to feel, and is not something that would be casually misdiagnosed. My horse, even despite being lame right now tracks up beautifully, yet he always seems to have a higher pain tolerance and moves out when other horses would short step. I can only tell because he is dipping his head dramatically, and it is obvious the way throughout the rest of his body that he hurts. So short stepping isn't the only indicator of pain.

Some things that have helped Jake with his ringbone. I have my farrier roll Jake's toes a lot to help with break over, I have also heard that pads, or going barefoot helps with the impact as well. Though my gelding is shod on all four. I also worked him only on soft ground with good footing. I might be starting him on Previcoxx as well to help him out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,889 Posts
My vet said the previcox would not work on that area.
Perhaps they believe it's past that stage, too much ossification. 'Rads' BTW are radiographs, xrays.

I am going to try trimming him with rounded hoofs and see how he does.
Don't know exactly what you mean, but if he's only being done every 1 weeks, chances are he hasn't got the best feet. What is his living & working environment & how much work does he do? Does he land heel first?

He has had a head bob for quite a while, probably since I have gotten him. He has no sign of pain really,
Head bobbing lameness is a very obvious sign of pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
No, she hasn't gotten radio graphs yet.

Why would be be done "every 1 weeks"

Yes his feet are nice.
Sometimes the area gets muddy but it isn't bad.

He is a Walker he is going to have a head bob!
Lately he hasn't been working at all. Before that 3 days-4 days a week for 45 minutes.


Perhaps they believe it's past that stage, too much ossification. 'Rads' BTW are radiographs, xrays.



Don't know exactly what you mean, but if he's only being done every 1 weeks, chances are he hasn't got the best feet. What is his living & working environment & how much work does he do? Does he land heel first?



Head bobbing lameness is a very obvious sign of pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
My spotted saddle horse had beautiful hooves and feet. That has nothing to do with ringbone which is a type of arthritis. It can have lots of causes just like people have arthritis from lots of different causes...including they are just prone to it. Depending upon where it is, it can show up above the hooves as bony rideges or bumps. They can be seen, they can be felt. If it's lower, it may take an x-ray to see them. Most vets don't just casually toss out a diagnosis of ringbone because of the seriousness of the problem. I understand you may not like the news....but who has more training and experience in equine health, you or the vet? Vets see walking horses, they understand lameness and normal gaits. I may ask my vet for explanations, but I don't argue with him. He knows more than I do...that's why I pay him. If you don't believe your vet, maybe you need to consult another vet. Either way, your horse needs help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,391 Posts
^^Exactly, bntnail nailed it. If the head nod is symmetrical, even height and side to side regardless of which front foot is landing, and the footfall is 1-2-3-4 and evenly weighted, you have a normal head nod. If it's 'off' and the least bit uneven, you have a head bob and the only reason horses have bobbing heads is because of lameness. If you have a TWH or another one of the stoic gaited horse breeds, be advised that he might not 'show' very much lameness - they are tanks! That head bob may be your only clue, besides what the vet can feel and see.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,889 Posts
Why would be be done "every 1 weeks"
Oops, meant to read 10 weeks, as you indicated. And yes, Hagon, ringbone can absolutely be to do with the state of hooves. It is by far not the only cause though, as previously stated & I wouldn't include 'they're just prone to it' as a valid reason tho.


He is a Walker he is going to have a head bob!.
Oh, perhaps I read wrongly, but I thought you'd said it wasn't like a normal gaited nod & it was only one foot, not both evenly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
My horse is getting helping. I am doing everything I can to get him as comfortable as possible.

There is no bumps or heat.
I don't argue with my vet.
My spotted saddle horse had beautiful hooves and feet. That has nothing to do with ringbone which is a type of arthritis. It can have lots of causes just like people have arthritis from lots of different causes...including they are just prone to it. Depending upon where it is, it can show up above the hooves as bony rideges or bumps. They can be seen, they can be felt. If it's lower, it may take an x-ray to see them. Most vets don't just casually toss out a diagnosis of ringbone because of the seriousness of the problem. I understand you may not like the news....but who has more training and experience in equine health, you or the vet? Vets see walking horses, they understand lameness and normal gaits. I may ask my vet for explanations, but I don't argue with him. He knows more than I do...that's why I pay him. If you don't believe your vet, maybe you need to consult another vet. Either way, your horse needs help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
No, in the walk he looks fine. The vet even said that.
It's called a "nod" when they are gaiting and it's even side to side.

If just walking and more noticeable one one side(foot fall) vs the other then it's called a "head bob" and indicates lameness. Hence the term "head bobing lame"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
Right. I do know that

She said she couldn't feel anything, heat or swelling
^^Exactly, bntnail nailed it. If the head nod is symmetrical, even height and side to side regardless of which front foot is landing, and the footfall is 1-2-3-4 and evenly weighted, you have a normal head nod. If it's 'off' and the least bit uneven, you have a head bob and the only reason horses have bobbing heads is because of lameness. If you have a TWH or another one of the stoic gaited horse breeds, be advised that he might not 'show' very much lameness - they are tanks! That head bob may be your only clue, besides what the vet can feel and see.
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top