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Ringbone

171 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  Horse & Dog Mom
After cali came up lame at the beginning of the month, we have been monitoring her and she has continued to be noticeably off so she has had the time off. We finally got the vet out and I pointed out the nodule on her left front coronet band area, he felt both sides, we flexed and trotted both directions in a circle and his best estimate is ringbone. This coupled with her tripping on occasion I would lean to believe he is correct. Unfortunately my BIL declined xrays so we do not know if the stone she kicked disloged an existing nodule or what the remodeling actually loks like, this makes even potentially trying to use farrier care hard and she is already on previcox which he upped dosage on.
Unfortunately this doesn't sound like good news and the discussion of rights and wrongs has begun. She is about 20 this year so we are keeping the potential of having to let her out of pain humanely in mind. She is not a pasture pet candidate as she is extremely marish and I would not trust anyone nowadays to truly take care of her, for now she is content to buy anyone who dares look at the treat cabinet and falling asleep with any attention she is given.

Anyway all of that being said does anyone have any pointers or ideas I can spitball with my farrier to see if we can get her any relief. Currently the most noticeable nodule is sitting right abve the outter cronet band leading me to think low ringbone.
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That's a shame. Some horses do well enough once the joint ossifies.

An old treatment that I know a few vets have done studies on, is the use of therapeutic ultrasound. Not diagnostic ultrasound. It gives some good results but is labor intensive and having access to a therapeutic ultrasound machine and someone who knows how to use it is the tough part. If you know a physical or occupational therapist who is also a fan of horses, you might luck out.
 

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That's a shame. Some horses do well enough once the joint ossifies.

An old treatment that I know a few vets have done studies on, is the use of therapeutic ultrasound. Not diagnostic ultrasound. It gives some good results but is labor intensive and having access to a therapeutic ultrasound machine and someone who knows how to use it is the tough part. If you know a physical or occupational therapist who is also a fan of horses, you might luck out.
Thank you! I think that is why she was comfortable prior to the stone, my thought is she knocked something loose causing this flare up. I wasn't there so only going off my teen nieces description makes it tough.
Unfortunately we are not close to any specialties so that might be a tough find but I will see if I can find anything.
 
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Rocker toes on her shoes over a frog support pad over dental impression material.
Engage the back half of her foot, cushion her landing, and ease her breakover.
If there is any chance of getting those x-rays go for it
 

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Since the BIL is not willing to spend money on x-rays, he likely won’t pay for therapeutic ultrasound.

He probably also wouldn’t pay for a 6” X 9” red light therapy pad. It’s not that expensive but if you paid for it, you sure wouldn’t want to leave a $250-something therapy device at his farm.


It would help with circulation and bring relief but not a magic bullet to make the calcium disappear.

All you can do is hope the farrier knows how to trim her correctly, the BIL will consent to trimming her every four weeks, and keep her on Previcox - if he will pay for that.
 
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