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For a mare what are the risks of having a miscarry or promblems during pregnancy I dont want to loose my mare but I do want a baby that I can train and barrel race/pole bend and or keyhole:runninghorse2:
 

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Are you looking to breed or is she already in foal? If she isn't already in foal I will suggest now that you NOT do it. Why not buy a baby on the ground or a nice 2 or 3 year old, where you see what you are getting? Breeding a mare, while usually straight forward as long as everything is done properly (pre-breeding exam, regular prenatal care, proper nutrition, etc), it is EXPENSIVE. You are looking at quite a bit of $$ just to get a foal on the ground. And then, you don't know what you are getting until it's there. Does your mare have a good pedigree? Conformation? Show record? Is she registered? These are all things to considered. There are SO MANY horses that need homes, that you can easily find what you are looking for already on the ground.

Are you prepared to keep a foal with conformational issues for the rest of it's life? That is a chance you take with any breeding. Just some food for thought.
 

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There are no guarantees when breeding, period!


If you want.. "I do want a baby that I can train and barrel race/pole bend and or keyhole"
The buy a baby already on the ground that is built and bred for those activities...
There are still no guarantees then either...
Just cause you want it does not mean the animal will excel in it, like it or make that kind of riding horse...
There are no guarantees when referring to such young stock and total unknowns.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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My mother understood & accepted the risks of pregnancy. She had 2 miscarriages before me. She wanted a girly girl who loved ballet & faeries... & would grow into an academic lady(a lawyer or such). Instead she got me, always a tomboy, became a farrier. And my sisters who actually rebelled at wearing 'nice' girlie stuff before i did. One is a rugby player(not touch).

And Dad loved his daughters but everyone commiserated with him for not having a son... then commiserated even more when the son who finally came grew up to be a ballet dancer.

There are a bazillion horses already in the world that need good homes. There are many who could do what you want, well built, healthy, right personality for the job... and there are many horses people bred for a purpose who end up at the doggers market because they aren't the right type for the owners aspirations. And are you also prepared for the expense & waiting 4 or more years to start learning whether what you've got is what you want?
 

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@loosie that is too funny. My daughter is girly to a certain extend but wont ever let me fix her hair or wear the nice clothes I want her to wear. My son on the other hand loves nothing more than shoe shopping and dressing snazzy. Yesterday we were having a dance party (they are 5 and 7) and my son kept changing because he had the "perfect outfit" for every song LOL.

Not horse related at all, but funny.
 

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It's a lot easier to get what you want if you buy a weanling or yearling than it is to raise your own. Even if all goes well, the cost of breeding and caring for a mare correctly, then raising a foal to an adult is FAR more than simply buying what you want.


And when breeding anything, you do risk losing both the mare AND the foal. Even people who do everything right can have bad things happen. If you aren't experienced in foaling and breeding, you would do far better to purchase what you want rather than breeding yet another horse that may or may not be good for anything as an adult.
 

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Loosie, that's too funny. My brother and his wife are big into equality so when they had their first daughter, they were adamant-- no pink frilly stuff, no 'girly' things, she could be whoever she wanted to be and no 'this is for girls and this is for boys' clothing or toys. My brother was hoping she'd like being outdoors, sports, and things like that.


They got a princess. She loves glitter, pink clothes, fairies, unicorns, ruffles, sparkles, and swirly skirts. He had to learn how to braid and curl her hair as she refuses to leave the house if it's 'too plain'. She's a hoot at age 4. Their younger daughter, just an infant still, is rather easygoing and carefree, so she will likely be more of a tomboy.
 

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and my son kept changing because he had the "perfect outfit" for every song LOL.
Haha! Perhaps he's getting in early, heard the song 'Every Girl's Crazy For A Sharp Dressed Man'. Which reminds me, everyone assumed my bro must be gay, just because he did ballet, but he actually found, being one of very few straight guys doing it at the Victorian College Of The Arts, that he was... very popular with all the ballerinas!
 

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SM I assume it's just as hard over there to buy clothes for girls that AREN'T pink & frilly or such, or for boys without cars on?? Or rudely short shorts for girls... do you know how hard it is to find shorts for girls that are a decent length... & not skin tight, so they can actually mess around, climb trees etc??
 
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