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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hoping someone can help me decipher what just happened. Leaving the round pen, one of the horses caught a foot on the bottom bar (it was loud), one jump and mine went sideways. I can’t tell if it was from being scared or purposely getting me off.
Rewind about a month ago and she bucked me for the first time since I’ve had her because my husband cantered out and she didn’t want to be held back.
Bucked twice in a month and now just getting scared of her.

 

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I think she spooked and then because she was in spook mode and there was something on her back, she bucked. So was she trying to get you off? I guess. But not because she was thinking about it ("Ha, now I can get rid of this annoying hooman"). She got startled and in the heat of the moment imagined that the person on her back was a lion or something.

That's my interpretation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think she spooked and then because she was in spook mode and there was something on her back, she bucked. So was she trying to get you off? I guess. But not because she was thinking about it ("Ha, now I can get rid of this annoying hooman"). She got startled and in the heat of the moment imagined that the person on her back was a lion or something.

That's my interpretation.
thank you.
It’s really starting to scare me :( she had no spook up until the last month, the gelding is kind of high energy so doesn’t make it any easier. I’m just glad I was able to get my leg over and off in time. I almost want to call it quits after this
 

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She didn’t look very serious about it to me. I think maybe when she spooked you gripped (naturally) and it was just a reaction from her (again naturally).

That said, the more times you come off the more likely she will get serious about it, especially if she has that type of temperament. If you are scared of her, it is okay to find something different. There are horses who wouldn’t do that, and you could just have fun on.
 

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I think this would be a good time to ask someone with a really sticky seat to get on her and ride her in situations where she is likely to get spooked. She needs to unlearn this behavior because if it keeps going, it will be her go-to anytime something frightens her.

That said, I don't think she was trying to get you off. Those aren't really hard bucks. I think it was just a reaction.

While you have someone else ride her through a few difficult moments, you should ride a quiet horse to rewrite the movie in your head that is playing this on a loop. I know just how terrifying this is. I used to have a mare who would spook explosively, then spin, bolt, and spin again in the other direction until I flew off her. This happened many times, and I eventually got a concussion. I sold her to someone who was a better match for her than me. My current horse gave me my confidence back. That's the kind of horse you need right now, one with more whoa than go.

What is the training on this mare? Is she still somewhat green? If so, some solid schooling by an experienced rider might also be in order.
 

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Hoping someone can help me decipher what just happened. Leaving the round pen, one of the horses caught a foot on the bottom bar (it was loud), one jump and mine went sideways. I can’t tell if it was from being scared or purposely getting me off.
Rewind about a month ago and she bucked me for the first time since I’ve had her because my husband cantered out and she didn’t want to be held back.
Bucked twice in a month and now just getting scared of her.

Not sure I would call that a buck. Maybe more of a crow hop. But regardless, what I liked about your horse is that she seemed to be aware of her surroundings and DIDN'T kick your husband in the head, who was directly behind her. That could have potentially been very bad. Watching her body language, seems to me she knew he was there and withheld herself.

So that being said, that's not a malicious buck. It was NOT a bucking-to-get-you-off type of buck. Looks like something started her, she lurched forward scared and you happened to come off.

I don't know your riding experience. Looks like your stirrups are a tad too long and you were holding your reins much too long to help you at all, so those are some things you can adjust. If your reins are too long, you have no control over your horse when something like this happens.

Teach yourself to have the INSTINCT to immediately grab that inside rein as low as you can, and pull her head around. With your other hand, grad the saddle horn. And try to force your body BACK. Sit your butt down. When you get your weight thrown forward, that's when you get dismounted.

Perhaps you had the wind knocked out of you for this. But what I would have done differently is the instant you hit the ground, you get back on your feet immediately and you go after your horse. Mean it. Get mad if you have to. Make her move her butt away from you and move it hard. The behavior is unacceptable and she needs to know it.

And if you weren't capable (wind knocked out), then husband should jump in immediately and scold your horse for you from the ground. She has now effectively gotten away with this TWICE. It could continue now that she has learned you are easy to unseat.

Watch this video of my horse Dexter letting out a small buck at the end of a barrel run. He does it about about 49 seconds into the video. (If you want to see the slow motion, move ahead to 2 min 18 sec) But he doesn't hardly even jostle my body position or throw me forward, even though I was "leaning" forward. Because my stirrups were adjusted correctly, I kept my lower leg centered, and kept my weight centered. And yes, that was a playful buck for him. He likes to do that once or twice a year. Normally he gets scolded. I didn't that time because we were doing a run ..... and I was kinda laughing at him after that........

You're horses bucks are easily riding IF you can keep yourself balanced.
 

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your insecrue mare had problems with 'loosing it' when your husband left on his horse, and she couldn't take it. Your husband's horse if 'following ' the lead of your husband, but your horse is following that other horse, instead of your leadership. She is totally unaware of you, and you are not in any way guiding or leading this horse. You are acting as a passive passenger, in a state of 'trust'. Unfortunately, your mare is very anxious about being left behind. Once she is in an emotional state of anxiety, she will be anxious about ANYTHING beyond being nose to butt to your husband's hosre. In this case, they were seperated a bit, and your mare panicked, and the slightest sound set her off to reacting by bucking.

You , in turn , collapsed when she got less than steady, and you were buckd off very easily.
I know that sounds rough, and I've come off in times that are embarrassingly easy. It happens . do not blame the horse for that. You gave up and consigned yourself to falling off too easily.. in the future, you will learn to fight for it a bit more.

And, you will not let this mare get so mentally separated from you that she has more concern for the horse's butt in front of her, than for what you are telling her to do.

This is pretty harsh, but it's real. you will either learn how to deal with this mare, (and improve your seat), or you will find a calmer horse. In the meantime, your husband needs to anticipate trouble with this mare if he 'leaves' you in any way, taking his horse out in the lead like that.
 

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My opinion is that this incident happened because of the gelding. If I remember right, your horse's companion died, and this gelding is a new addition. I suspect from the horses' body language that the gelding might have rules for your mare to follow regarding personal space or insists on her respect. It looks like you pass closely behind him, and then the sudden noise right when her vision of him is blocked probably made her believe he was coming after her. I would call it "rider error," passing close to another horse's rear end through a tight space, which would have her on edge about getting trapped and kicked. Then the coincidence of the sound gave her a fright.

Your other incident also involved the new gelding. Beginning to ride with a new horse who is also a new pasture companion is adding an element of danger to your situation. If I were you, I'd have a talk with your husband about how rides are going to proceed. He will need to stay in control of his horse and the pace, and be considerate of how your mare may react. You should maintain a safe space around your mare, and keep her from thinking she will be left behind or that the gelding might be running off spooking. She is very in tune to the gelding's body language at the moment, figuring him out, and you may need to spend time riding her alone while he is tied or penned nearby, so she realizes she should tune in to you and that you won't put her into a bad situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
your insecrue mare had problems with 'loosing it' when your husband left on his horse, and she couldn't take it. Your husband's horse if 'following ' the lead of your husband, but your horse is following that other horse, instead of your leadership. She is totally unaware of you, and you are not in any way guiding or leading this horse. You are acting as a passive passenger, in a state of 'trust'. Unfortunately, your mare is very anxious about being left behind. Once she is in an emotional state of anxiety, she will be anxious about ANYTHING beyond being nose to butt to your husband's hosre. In this case, they were seperated a bit, and your mare panicked, and the slightest sound set her off to reacting by bucking.

You , in turn , collapsed when she got less than steady, and you were buckd off very easily.
I know that sounds rough, and I've come off in times that are embarrassingly easy. It happens . do not blame the horse for that. You gave up and consigned yourself to falling off too easily.. in the future, you will learn to fight for it a bit more.

And, you will not let this mare get so mentally separated from you that she has more concern for the horse's butt in front of her, than for what you are telling her to do.

This is pretty harsh, but it's real. you will either learn how to deal with this mare, (and improve your seat), or you will find a calmer horse. In the meantime, your husband needs to anticipate trouble with this mare if he 'leaves' you in any way, taking his horse out in the lead like that.
I got my leg out of that stir up and let myself fall because the last time I stayed on I was in more pain from trying to stick it.

So yes I probably could have stuck with it, but I didn’t know if it was going to become a blow up event again.

I did have jitters and I’m sure it transferred but nobody how you land, it hurts. Bad.

I’m going to start working with her a lot more tomorrow. I was just riding her bareback yesterday and she was fine so it’s almost scarier that I can’t anticipate it.
 

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thank you.
It’s really starting to scare me :( she had no spook up until the last month, the gelding is kind of high energy so doesn’t make it any easier. I’m just glad I was able to get my leg over and off in time. I almost want to call it quits after this
If you are scared of her she will pickup on that then become reactive. She spooked scooted forward crow hopping. An off you went looked like you were easily unseated then came off.

Problem is once they learn they can loose there rider, it can become a serious problem. Starts of innocent enough until it's not. When I've been bucked off, I let horse know it's not ok to buck and I won't tolerate it period.

My gelding did a full on rodeo broncing several years ago. He didn't manage to loose me I rode it out. I managed to get his head back up an get him stopped. He got the snot worked out of him after that.

He learned just because his buddy gets out ahead of him ,rodeo broncing isn't ok or aloud. When we were done he was dripping sweat head held low. Could of cared less his buddy was way ahead of him. He never tried that again the lesson was memorable.

Rode the next day repeated same lesson. His buddy left him behind at a canter an he was ok with that. I let him catch up but on my terms not his. Did this every day for two weeks...never another issue since . In the two weeks time he did try it a few more times. But was half hearted attempts an easily shut down. He learned broncing means you work harder.
 

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I got my leg out of that stir up and let myself fall because the last time I stayed on I was in more pain from trying to stick it.

So yes I probably could have stuck with it, but I didn’t know if it was going to become a blow up event again.

I did have jitters and I’m sure it transferred but nobody how you land, it hurts. Bad.
I get that sometimes it's smarter to let yourself bail, but not in this case. If you had the frame of mind to actually think about getting your leg out of the stirrup and allowing yourself out of the saddle, you can certainly have the frame of mind to do the opposite and stay IN the saddle. She didn't do that much in the video. You could have regained control over her. And imagine the confidence boost in yourself!

I’m going to start working with her a lot more tomorrow. I was just riding her bareback yesterday and she was fine so it’s almost scarier that I can’t anticipate it.
Okay I've been riding for over 30 years. And NEVER would I get on a horse bareback that just bucked me off the day before. Never. If I got bucked off with a saddle, you bet I'm going to get bucked off faster without one. So I don't personally think that's the best idea. JMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I get that sometimes it's smarter to let yourself bail, but not in this case. If you had the frame of mind to actually think about getting your leg out of the stirrup and allowing yourself out of the saddle, you can certainly have the frame of mind to do the opposite and stay IN the saddle. She didn't do that much in the video. You could have regained control over her. And imagine the confidence boost in yourself!



Okay I've been riding for over 30 years. And NEVER would I get on a horse bareback that just bucked me off the day before. Never. If I got bucked off with a saddle, you bet I'm going to get bucked off faster without one. So I don't personally think that's the best idea. JMO.
It was the day before today, yesterday. So I guess what I’m saying is typically she has a really good, easy going mind. But two bucks in a month freaks me out. Though now I realize this wasn’t as bad as a “buck” I thought it was and more a crow hop.

In regards to the confidence boost I’d get staying on, I would love that. In the moment it really felt like she was going to do a full on thing like she did last time. This and the last time are my first times going thru this. So I don’t really know how to stay on… I could definitely use some pointers there. At one point I did try to bring her head to the side but that didn’t work.

We’re going to dig that panel down and bury the bottom bar because it’s not the first time either of them have caught on it. Hopefully that fixes things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think this would be a good time to ask someone with a really sticky seat to get on her and ride her in situations where she is likely to get spooked. She needs to unlearn this behavior because if it keeps going, it will be her go-to anytime something frightens her.

That said, I don't think she was trying to get you off. Those aren't really hard bucks. I think it was just a reaction.

While you have someone else ride her through a few difficult moments, you should ride a quiet horse to rewrite the movie in your head that is playing this on a loop. I know just how terrifying this is. I used to have a mare who would spook explosively, then spin, bolt, and spin again in the other direction until I flew off her. This happened many times, and I eventually got a concussion. I sold her to someone who was a better match for her than me. My current horse gave me my confidence back. That's the kind of horse you need right now, one with more whoa than go.

What is the training on this mare? Is she still somewhat green? If so, some solid schooling by an experienced rider might also be in order.
She is the more woah than go out of the two and the reactions lately are really strange to me. :/ Her official training I don’t really know. I got her from a person who got her out of a neglectful situation and she said she was an awesome trail horse and for the most part she is absolutely is. Usually spooks in place, maybe a tiny jump if anything. Very confident on trail, just mozies on. As long as she has a buddy…
I’m going to see what happens and am considering sending her to a trainer near me that would do a 30 day training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you are scared of her she will pickup on that then become reactive. She spooked scooted forward crow hopping. An off you went looked like you were easily unseated then came off.

Problem is once they learn they can loose there rider, it can become a serious problem. Starts of innocent enough until it's not. When I've been bucked off, I let horse know it's not ok to buck and I won't tolerate it period.

My gelding did a full on rodeo broncing several years ago. He didn't manage to loose me I rode it out. I managed to get his head back up an get him stopped. He got the snot worked out of him after that.

He learned just because his buddy gets out ahead of him ,rodeo broncing isn't ok or aloud. When we were done he was dripping sweat head held low. Could of cared less his buddy was way ahead of him. He never tried that again the lesson was memorable.

Rode the next day repeated same lesson. His buddy left him behind at a canter an he was ok with that. I let him catch up but on my terms not his. Did this every day for two weeks...never another issue since . In the two weeks time he did try it a few more times. But was half hearted attempts an easily shut down. He learned broncing means you work harder.
After I got my wind back I took her in the pen and worked her for a good while then got back on. But by then my confidence was shot so we didn’t go on a ride.

The first buck she gave me before this was full on bronco and terrifying. So this was certainly different and if I could learn some tips on how to regain control that would probably nip this right away instead of letting it happen again.
 

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Something else I noticed is that when the mare darted forward, it looked like the saddle might have gone forward too (hard to see, the video was very small). I'd check your saddle and girth placement to make sure the front of the tree is back behind the shoulder, and the cinch is not rubbing the elbows.

Have you normally been cantering on the trails, or are these situations faster than you usually ride? If you have been doing slow, walking rides, it could be that your saddle is placed wrong or doesn't fit well, and when you go faster it is going forward or pinching the shoulders. That can give some horses the urge to crow hop or buck. Some horses hunch up if a cinch pulls forward and rubs the elbows.

Do you lunge her with the saddle on at the canter? Does it ever go forward or make her crow hop or buck? If so, you might need to check your saddle fit.
It is important to know that if your horse does run, the tack will stay in place and not bother your horse, so you don't have any additional problems besides steering and giving cues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Something else I noticed is that when the mare darted forward, it looked like the saddle might have gone forward too (hard to see, the video was very small). I'd check your saddle and girth placement to make sure the front of the tree is back behind the shoulder, and the cinch is not rubbing the elbows.

Have you normally been cantering on the trails, or are these situations faster than you usually ride? If you have been doing slow, walking rides, it could be that your saddle is placed wrong or doesn't fit well, and when you go faster it is going forward or pinching the shoulders. That can give some horses the urge to crow hop or buck. Some horses hunch up if a cinch pulls forward and rubs the elbows.

Do you lunge her with the saddle on at the canter? Does it ever go forward or make her crow hop or buck? If so, you might need to check your saddle fit.
It is important to know that if your horse does run, the tack will stay in place and not bother your horse, so you don't have any additional problems besides steering and giving cues.
I am a walk/trot rider through and through. I have not thought about saddle fit, but she has a really high whither and I put the saddle pretty forward.

I don’t have a side photo with her saddle on but this is how I position it.
 

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I wouldn't call that a buck, more of a crow hop. I think you might benefit from some lessons and learn how to react if or when a horse bucks. I had a student get terrified because her horse did a little buck. We had a conversation about how all horses buck and she needs to learn how to sit a buck. How to control the horse afterwards. She got scared and fell apart, lost reins. Her pony who is typically a good horse was going what do I do? What do I do? and just kept on trotting in a nervous manner.

Heels down, grab your reins and ask him to whoa. Don't bail. You will get hurt bailing off and possibly break something. You don't bail because of a crow hop.

you probably want to enlist a trainer because there are things a trainer will spot that you will miss. The above mentioned pony is green and didn't like bouncy legs. Needed some desensitization on leg pressure. Being ridden by adults meant leg pressure was in a different spot then when ridden by a child. That is a small detail an inexperienced person could miss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I wouldn't call that a buck, more of a crow hop. I think you might benefit from some lessons and learn how to react if or when a horse bucks. I had a student get terrified because her horse did a little buck. We had a conversation about how all horses buck and she needs to learn how to sit a buck. How to control the horse afterwards. She got scared and fell apart, lost reins. Her pony who is typically a good horse was going what do I do? What do I do? and just kept on trotting in a nervous manner.

Heels down, grab your reins and ask him to whoa. Don't bail. You will get hurt bailing off and possibly break something. You don't bail because of a crow hop.

you probably want to enlist a trainer because there are things a trainer will spot that you will miss. The above mentioned pony is green and didn't like bouncy legs. Needed some desensitization on leg pressure. Being ridden by adults meant leg pressure was in a different spot then when ridden by a child. That is a small detail an inexperienced person could miss.
Yes, it would probably be a good idea. All these years and I’ve never had a horse do this so I didn’t think I’d need to learn how to sit a buck or even a crow hop. I got lucky with the horses I’ve had, I suppose. I guess it’s better late than never!
 

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I am a walk/trot rider through and through. I have not thought about saddle fit, but she has a really high whither and I put the saddle pretty forward.

I don’t have a side photo with her saddle on but this is how I position it.
If you haven't cantered on her, it may be just the saddle fit or placement that is causing her to buck.
 
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