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Discussion Starter #1
What to do about a saddle pad that rubs right before horses hips. It’s my favorite pad and I don’t want to get rid of it. I haven’t been using it for about 2 months now and would like to continue using it! Picture of the rub mark isn’t EXACTLY what it looks like, even now and second picture is where the pad usually sits. My horse is very short both height wise and length wise so I’m guessing the pad is just too long? But her other pad sits in the same spot and doesn’t run.
 

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Felt pads have a tendency to rub hair, I've noticed more so in the Fall when their hair is dry and brittle and I'm horseback all day.

If this is a new occurrence you may also consider your horse maybe hollowing his back due to soreness or poor saddle fit.
 
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The pad looks too long for him, though it is hard to get a real look at that angle. You seem to have it way forward and it is still looking a little long.

Sorry to say you may not be able to keep using it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hope it is just fall... and I have to pull it forward a little extra so it doesn’t rest on her hips. I will try it again this spring/summer but you are probably right about not being about to use it
 

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My saddle pads, both my cheap ones and my expensive pads have about 2" stick out around my saddle in front and behind the skirting, that is it.
Actually, about 2" is what you see no matter where you look.
Your wear leather should be under the pommel and under where your leg lays...not seen.

This pad is to long for the horses anatomy....everyplace in my opinion.
It rubs though because of how it is stitched top to bottom layer and that one of those parts is non-conforming to the horses spine and hip girdle.
The materials used are not "forgiving" to form fit the horses back.
You need a shorter pad by several inches or a rounded style pad to benefit your horse.

I would not continue to use the pad knowing it rubs enough to leave that kind of substantial marks and or make the horse sore...just not worth it to me to cause my horse that kind of discomfort.

You could try cutting this pad shorter....
You're going to need to restitch the pad together though with a commercial machine not a machine you use for regular clothes repair...
Saddle pads are thick material to get needle and thread through and tough sewing.
Measure the saddle skirting and add a couple of inches in length... would guess 4" - 6" at most.
{Measure twice, cut once as once cut you can't put it back}
Right now this picture shows a lot of pad hanging out the front and a huge amount of pad out the back...
If this is actually how the pad fits your saddle and horse, it is not a good match.

I'm not saying this is also a problem, but that much "wiggle" to cause a pad rub makes me wonder if there is a issue with saddle fit with the rear of the saddle slipping all over the spine...that is one huge wicked looking rub...
2 months healed :eek:
Something, a few somethings are seriously wrong.

Do you use a rear cinch on your saddle?

I hate to tell you this but if the rub picture is accurate and "new"...the pad you are using is not doing the horse any good either.
There is minimal hair re-growth and that means it too is rubbing.
Pad material may not and is not the same, but it still is rubbing pretty good.
2 months of not using the other pad, gone through winter cold and the horse still is bald looking...
Something, a few somethings are seriously wrong.

I hope you find a answer but my first thought is neither pad is benefiting the horse to protect the back correctly.
That is a large rub area that is occurring from 2 different pads...
I would be looking at what sits on top of that pad as a possible culprit and figure out what is wrong before your horse comes up seriously back sore..
sorry.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will not use the other pad. The pad I am using now does not touch the rub marks as it is rounded. I used it for almost a year on her with NO problems before I bought my new pad (picture). I don’t see how the pad I am using now would be causing or prolonging any of this. Especially since I’ve only ridden her about 5 times in the past 4 weeks with a saddle (but more bareback). But I will talk to my vet and see what’s going on and why it’s not growing back. Thank you everyone for your help
 

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I don’t see how the pad I am using now would be causing or prolonging any of this. I will talk to my vet and see what’s going on and why it’s not growing back.
Glad you will speak to your vet about this as that is the person with the most knowledge to help you...

If anything is touching that area it can still be just enough irritation to stop hair growth on the damaged skin.
A winter blanket worn could cause that to happen, not just a saddle pad.

From what that picture looks like the rub actually looks like some callousing may have taken place...
That would mean the hair follicles could of been damaged...
Follicles is where the hair grows from...

You can try rubbing Vitamin E cream into that area...
It can soften and soothe the skin and that might help the callous reduce and stimulate the hair follicles to start producing hair again...
Some people use baby oil and say it works too...:shrug:

I have used the Vitamin E cream on bad blanket rubs and had great success with it healing the damaged tissue.

Good luck.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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My suspicion is that the material the pad is made of is too rough or your saddle doesn't fit well. I have never had a pad rub my horse- ever. Not even if i use a full size pad on a pony.
 

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A couple ideas...
1) your pad is too long. Either cut it or get rid of it.
2) your saddle doesn’t fit, which may cause the back of the saddle to move around too much, causing the pad to move, causing the run. If that’s the case, you need a different saddle.
3) your horse’s body does not agree with the material the pad is made of. Get rid of it.

Since you say the other pad you have is the same length and does not cause rub marks, then I am inclined to think it’s going to be idea #3.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you everyone! I’m probably going to trade it out for a shorter one and less thick (it’s a super heavy and dense pad).
 

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the thicker a pad the less 'give' it will have in the material, so it will be stiffer and not follow the contour of the horse's back as well.

that is likely why it is rubbing. i've seen folks use pads this length (in relation to the horse's back and saddle length) that are not so thick and there are not any rub marks after. i've seen folks use thick pads the same size and they get rub marks happening.

i would not use it any more at all on this horse. save it for a longer backed horse or sell it on.
 
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