The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm 6'3", 225 lbs. Is a 17" seat in line with my dimensions, or may a 16" work? Lots more 16" on the used market. Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
If you have a local tack store, they usually have saddle stands that you can actually sit on the saddles and get a feel for the different seat sizes. From personal experience, I’m a 5’11” woman around 200 lbs and I use a 16” seat and I don’t have a skinny butt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
I think a 16" or 17" would work for you. I weigh a few pounds less, but am also much shorter than you, and ride in a 16" Circle Y or American Saddlery (old lesson saddle), or a 17" Corriente. For reference, my husband is 6'4" and 260ish pounds and fits comfortably in an 18" Circle Y.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,436 Posts
At your height, you will prefer a 16 and a half, if you can find it.



What kind of horse will wear it? and what kind of saddle? ( I assume you are talking western) . . trail, roping, ranch, equitation?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,747 Posts
WELCOME to the Forum!!


For your height, a 17" western saddle would be most comfortable.
My son is 6'1 1/2" and 168 pounds...he rides in a 16" and would be better in a 17" with the length of femur that height gives. He is built long and lanky in looks.
You need to have a appropriate built horse though to be able to handle the weight of the larger seat sized saddle, plus the distribution area.
I would rather though see you in a saddle that spreads your weight, allows for your height, being thigh length especially than see you at all squished into to tight a saddle which would put more pressure to the saddle cantle than distribute it to saddle seat area..
I think 16.5 would also work, but harder to find than a 17" today.
It will also matter greatly the style, the discipline of the saddle you look to purchase.
You need to sit in many styles for an idea of what you want...there is big difference.
Yes, you can try-on saddles say in a 16" size and then know if a bit to tight or you feel so comfortable.
If in doubt about a bit to tight...go to the larger size!
Being "stuffed" in to small a saddle stinks. It effects everything for you and your mount = less enjoyment and then why bother making such a $$$$ investment. :|
By me, there are often 17" saddles "used" for sale...good manufacturers and good prices.
16.5" near never and lots of 16"... and I would not even look smaller than a 16".
:runninghorse2:...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,677 Posts
Western 17 would probably be your best if legs are on the long side. I know a few men with longer torso and shorter leg that could ride a 16 (better 16.5). English is a whole different ball game and those sizes would not work. Need to know what you are looking at Eng vs Western and style....


Horse too... Having a saddle is great but if it doesn't fit the horse you ride then no good for your purpose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,642 Posts
My hubby is 6'3 (and a smidge) and he rides in a 16" seat - BUT he likes a flatter saddle seat with a low cantle. He also weighs 205lbs. Saddle seat is usually based on the length of your thigh bone. My daughter is 5'10" and weights 120lbs and rides in a 16" saddle - she was fitted for a saddle by a saddle fitter. I have super short legs and am heavier 220lbs and ride in a 17" Tucker.

My advice is to sit in as many saddles as you can. Some cantles are higher than others and trap you in some seats are flatter etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I have always thought saddle size was determined by your circumference, not your height. The circumference of your thigh should comfortably sit between the cantle and swell with at least 2 inches clearance. Your best bet would be to sit in both a 16 and 17 inch seat to see which is more comfortable. My husband weighs 255 at 5'11" and rides a 16.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,436 Posts
I think the thigh thickness does have a distinct impact, but if the femur is really long, and yoiu are in a seat that is too short, your knee will be over the edge of the fender, so leg length should also be considered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I think the thigh thickness does have a distinct impact, but if the femur is really long, and yoiu are in a seat that is too short, your knee will be over the edge of the fender, so leg length should also be considered.
This depends only on the length of your fender and how adjustable your stirrups are to length. Fenders are interchangeable from youth to adult and differing adult sizes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,100 Posts
A 6'3" guy using our 16" Circle Y on our 14.3 hands Appy:


The problem this guy had was our stirrups would not extend far enough so his legs were bent more than he liked.

I don't think femur length has much to do with western saddles. If the stirrups adjust long enough, then it will be OK. It isn't like an English saddle with knee rolls, where a long femur and bent leg can cause your knee to go past the knee roll. I've got stubby legs, but my knee goes past the saddle and fender both:


That is a 16" Abetta. Helping a friend move sheep a few years back, I borrowed a 13" saddle. Not much wiggle room in it, but my legs were OK.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top