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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at buying a horse, but have some things to consider pre-purchase. My concern is with integrating him into the herd. We have a make shift "arena" type concept we've put up until we can have one built. It's made out of hot tape and those white things you stick in the ground with (capped) T-Posts for the corners to keep it tight. It's four feet high. It shares a fence with our pasture, so this is where he would go to meet the herd. My concern is that this will not be safe enough to leave him in for extended periods of time or overnight. I feel like I have seen horses contained in this fashion before, but I'm really unsure. We don't really have another area to put him in to introduce him overnight. The other pastures are quite far away, and I don't like the idea of him being in a stall alone in the barn all night.

Any thoughts?
Am I just being paranoid/overly cautious, or is that an unsafe situation?
 

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Id worry about him impailing himself if you use those metal T posts. Its rare but it can happen with anything sharp on the end of a post. I really like that RAMM tape (not the electric) with a strand of electric on the top. I have no idea how hard it is to actually put wooden posts up, but I like them better then the metal T posts. We have some hog pannels up in certain parts of the pasture, it keeps the sheep/goats out, and they are notorious for getting into places they shouldnt be. Its not chicken wire. The hogs pannel can stand alone as long as it has some reinforcement from a few posts.
 

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The neighbors down the road from my boyfriend's house have their horses in a pasture that is 100% white tape fencing (hot) supported by t-posts, but they HAVE to be CAPPED or you risk him impaling himself. The corner posts really should be wood if at all possible. This fencing keeps them perfectly contained and content. Never had a problem to my knowledge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The T-Posts are capped, so no worries there. It's just a temporary "arena" where I just ride mostly, but the only place for him to be near the herd for the first few days.

I think it's just the height that concerns me. Is four foot tall hot tape really safe for him to be in overnight?

These are the things that the tape is connected to.

http://www.centralsaddlery.co.uk/mediaLibrary/images/english/119837.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here is a picture of the fencing:
(Excuse the horse! He's a work in progress)




Here you can see the hot tape fencing connects to four board:

 

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Oh. Hmm.. It's only four feet tall? How tall is the horse? Is he an avid jumper? Do you think he'd be curious or troublesome enough to try anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
He's 15.1. I haven't met him yet, just talked to his owner, but I prefer to be fully prepared before bringing anyone home. I was planning on asking those types of questions. He's only be in that area for a few days, I just don't feel like it's a good idea to leave him in there overnight. =/

EDIT:
I do know that he is low on the totem pole in his herd. Would a few hours of an over-the-fence introduction, then a few more hours of a supervised field introduction be ok? I don't want the poor guy to get the crud kicked out of him over night. This is a new farm, so I've never dealt with not having adjacent pastures for introductions before.
 

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If you aren't comfortable leaving him in it overnight, then don't. But keep in mind that if he wants out of the pasture, he'll get out, no matter what kind of fencing you have.

Personally, if at all possible, I prefer to keep new horses in a stall their first few days and give them a few hours at a time throughout the day outside, so they have time to learn their new surroundings without getting too overwhelmed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would love to be able to keep him stalled, but he weaves when he's left alone. I was going to try holding off on stalling him until we could get into the routine of being fed in the stall, then going back out, so he learns the stall isn't so bad. Anyway, back on track. I may just have to put him in another field by himself, near-ish the land owners horses. But he wouldn't be able to see them when they go into their shelter at night. =/ I figure he'll start weaving then too.
Oiy.
 

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I have kept horses overnight n a fence like that. (tried actually) We were trying to introduce a new horse. Someone (possibly sister's pony at the time) came on through and he was just hanging with the herd the next morning all hunky dory. It all depends on the horse. Now once they have gone through being kept entirely separate to check for disease they just go right on in with the established herd, but we have much larger fields so that new horses can get away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
He's had a pre-purchase, and passed. The field he would be in is about 8-10 or so acres, I'm not really sure. Considering those things, do you feel it would be ok to send him right in with the herd? Supervised of course, for a few hours, then going home? (As long as they get along fairly well, of course.)
 

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Sounds like you are boarding him. A couple of things.

1> Electric fences are for sure the safest fence in my opinion. Horses--once they learn about them--stay off of them. You didn't mention what type of fence the main pasture has. That would be the key. If it is electric be sure to teach him about the fence before you let him go.

2> Most facilities have a holding pen for new arrivals--isolating a horse--etc. If he is used to being with other horses the fence you show will probably not hold him. Isolating him for 7 days makes sure that he is not going to bring anything with him. Even though you think he is OK there are a lot of mean bugs out there that can casue lots of problems for all.

3>When you do turn him loose bring a friend. You walk the fence lines with your horse, stopping in every corner and turning him. Your friend keeps all the other curious ones away. Turn him loose in the center and hang around for a while-- best in the middle of the day not right at dark for sure. Show him where he eats and where the water is. If he is used to pasture board then you should be able to catch him.
 

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He should be fine if you just toss him in with the herd. Walk the fenceline with him, show him the water and the food, and then take off the lead rope and let him go, leaving the halter on so you can catch him more easily if need be. Just remember that a pecking order WILL be established, no matter how you introduce him. Don't panic when they kick and bite each other, it's what they do. Only interfere if the horses are getting too rough or seem to be causing serious damage.
 

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My mare was out in a fence lower then that over night. She was fine, but she was with her pasture mates. My mare will jump a fence if shes out alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks so much for all the help!
The land we lease doesn't have a holding facility, since it's not really a boarding barn. So, I think I'll just do what was suggested, walk the fence line and show him the water and hang out and watch for awhile. The herd we have will probably put him in his place really fast- they're a sassy bunch!

Thanks so much again!
 

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All our pastures are hotwire with t-posts. Very rarely have the horses go through the fence, usually happens if a tree falls on the wire. And we have never had a horse impale themselves on the posts in 14 years of having them.
 

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Oh. Hmm.. It's only four feet tall? How tall is the horse?
That's what I was thinking too. :shock: It looks like it's just 3 feet. Or the horse is huge. If he doesn't jump at all I think it could be OK. But I'd go with 5 feet frankly. My horse jumped 4.5 feet at 2.5 years old (and she was under 15 hands). Other then that hot tape is used by number of people I know (including boarding place I used to keep my horses in) and I havn't heard about any problems with it.
 

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We had 4 horses, including an Arab and a 16.3hh Saddlebred inside T posts fence with one strand on top of white tape and 3 strands of wire and never had problems for a year. We will be doing T posts with high gauge electric and a strand of white tape here at our new place soon - along the front fence line, and the sides and back are already in high tensile. The fence was approx 4.5 feet high.
 

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I keep my horses in electric wire fencing with t posts that have caps on them. They are jumpers and are just fine with a 5 and a half foot fence. If you want to see it there might be some pics of it in my virtual barn.

Good luck!
 
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