The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

I'm new to posting on this forum, but I've been reading it for a long time.

I have been giving riding/ training lessons to a girl and her pony for about a month now and for payment, the family has given me a colt that was born in the wee hours of April 10, 2014.

A bit of a background on the dam and her people.... they are a bit ignorant with horses.... OK, a LOT. She is underweight (has been for a while). Everyone one of her caretakers has been bit or kicked by this mare at one point in time. She was rescued from an abusive home about 12 years ago (she is 18ish) and has not really been taught kind respect toward people... simply that people are here to give her a treat because that is all she got. This foal is her 8th and the owners didn't know how to tell if it was a filly or colt.

We moved mom and baby to my house last night because the family they were with were teaching the colt that it's OK to kick through squeezing his hind quarters and making him kick out at them. :evil: NOT something I want my colt to learn. So I asked them if I could move the mom and baby to my house so we could pay for her feed (they can't afford to feed her correctly). They were all for it. The mare ate a bale of hay in about about 4 hours last night :cry:

The colt appears to be healthy except for his hind legs. He is hopping a lot when he walks. Here is some pictures of it and a you tube link to a video of them. From what I have read, he should be kept in a stall and restricted from exercise for a good portion of the day and night to help his ligaments and bones correct themselves.

I have a funeral on Monday to attend out of state, but will be calling our vet to come out and take a look at him hopefully on Tuesday.

What do you all think of this?

Thanks for your help.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vz0UT7tCwmE&feature=em-upload_owner
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,049 Posts
He looks like a new born colt who is trying to figure out how to use his legs? Other than a well baby check to make sure he's gotten a good immunity transfer, I wouldn't worry too much about them at this point. If the vet sees anything really wonky that I'm not seeing from the video, he'll tell you and help you figure out how to fix any issues. Most leg issues (that aren't really gross deformities) will straighten out in time as the foal grows into their legs and tendons and ligaments get stronger.

When this little guy was born, his legs were so windswept I thought he was going to be crippled for life. The vet laughed at me and told me not to worry because he'd straighten up as he grew.



As a 16 hand yearling, you can see he straightened out just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is what I am really hoping for. My neighbor is a vet tech and has been around horses her entire life, where I only have 7 years of horse ownership under my belt, and never had a foal. When my neighbor started saying how concerned she is about it, it kinda freaked me out as she is a lot more knowledgeable about it than I am. I just want him to be safe and happy and healthy while being the horse he was meant to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,049 Posts
That is what I am really hoping for. My neighbor is a vet tech and has been around horses her entire life, where I only have 7 years of horse ownership under my belt, and never had a foal. When my neighbor started saying how concerned she is about it, it kinda freaked me out as she is a lot more knowledgeable about it than I am. I just want him to be safe and happy and healthy while being the horse he was meant to be.
Well, just bear in mind that there's years of HORSE experience and then there's years of FOAL experience and then there's years of NEONATAL FOAL experience and knowing what's normal for each one. I have almost 50 years HORSE experience and 30 years of breeding experience (working for others) and then I started breeding for myself about 20 years ago and in all that time I never had a foal with legs as crooked as Harley's. It scared the livin' tar right out of me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,046 Posts
He looks to me like a carrier bag foal! The sort that you want to pick up by the hind legs and give a good shake to straighten him out.

Worm the mare, get them out on good grass as soon as possible and look at him in two years.

Seriously he looks like he will be fine. They do need grass and because they have not been done well do not fall into feeding him a lot of hard feed as this can cause problems. Good grass is by far the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,837 Posts
Definitely a sweet foal. If you haven't already, please make sure you've got stuff in writing with your arrangement - specifically a bill of sale for the foal (even if it's a dollar) and perhaps something about the mom and the care you're giving her if you think it warrants it. If there's one thing I've learned in this forum, through other people's misfortunes, is those free bees or special deals come back and bite them when it's just word only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all so much. He is such a sweet colt. I will definitely write up a little contract for them to sign in regards to the both the sale of the colt and the boarding of the mare.

Here is another you tube video of them running.

http://youtu.be/evaVztanBDE
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,320 Posts
It does look to me like his hind pasterns are a little bit swollen, but I don't have a lot of foal experience (only 1 from birth) so some slight swelling might be normal the first few days *shrugs*. He's up and moving so I doubt it's anything serious. He's a cutie and I'm sure he'll grow out of it but keep us updated on what the vet says.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update...

The vet came out late last week and said that the colt is doing really well. He has lengthened up in the back as well as straightened up. The vet to not really worry about anything until he is about 45 days old when things start to really come together. He does have BIG hock joints that I'm hoping he grows into, but we will see.

Other than that, he is playful, loves people attention. He even will find your hand and move his butt to it for you to scratch him. Super cute.

I'll try and get some more pics/ videos to share with you all.

Thanks again for all your kind words.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Big, open hocks are a good thing unless they're swollen, and probably mean he's going to be a big boy :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
He would act in pain if they were swollen, wouldn't he? They are the same temp as everything else on his legs, just big. One hasa nice cut on it from when he fell but isn't infected at all and is healing really nicely. I can handle a big bit, though ;-)
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Most likely yes, although he could be just a stoic little guy. You can check if they're swollen by feeling them. His hocks should feel like bone, not squishy- and not be sensitive to you pushing on them, even if you do it pretty hard. And he obviously shouldn't be limping/looking like one is larger than the other, etc. I'd say chances are he's just a big hocked guy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KigerQueen

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Star City Slicker 22 days old running around - YouTube

Took this video of him running around this morning. Thought I'd let him get burst of energy out on the wet grass rather than the mud in the paddock from all the stinking rain we are getting. Not complaining though, because this summer will probably be stupid hot and dry. Gotta live Michigan extremes. ;)
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Has the mare had her immunizations for the year? If the people who own her are ignorant of horses, she may not have. Get her done so she passes this to the foal. Don't wait until disease strikes or an infection sets in from cuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Has the mare had her immunizations for the year? If the people who own her are ignorant of horses, she may not have. Get her done so she passes this to the foal. Don't wait until disease strikes or an infection sets in from cuts.
OP, I agree that you should find out about the vaccinations, but it's far too late for the mare to pass on anything to the foal, that must be done 30 days or so prior to foaling so that the foal can get the antibodies in the colostrum. If the mare was not vaccinated, then the foal should be vaccinated at 3-4 months of age. Here is a guideline from CSU:

http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/Documents/equine-medicine-surgery-vaccination-foal.pdf
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top