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I've been jumping under great coaching/lessons for 15+ years, but recently started increasing the height to 3'3"-3'6" ish. Now I need a good take off spot if it's going to be clean whereas when I was doing 2'6" and under, didn't really matter, the horse could chip or go long and still make it work.

I just started my FIRST lease, otherwise I've been swapping horses every few months for 20+years (probably ridden over 300 in my lifetime between the dressage or hunter barns, thoroughbred racing, trail rides, etc). I have a solid seat/leg, following hands, I'm like glue to the saddle so doesn't really matter if a horse jumps from a standstill, BUT obviously this looks disastrous and does not set you up well for a line, it's hard on their poor tendons, and would likely result in a rail.

Basically I have ZERO eye. I don't see it's a bad distance until it's 1 or 2 strides out. And then it's too late to adjust (but I usually try anyway...).This horse is VERY adjustable, he does exactly what I request, but I usually ask for the wrong thing... I either suck back if I think he could fit another in, or I drive him forward until he's too flat...

I want to know if anyone else has the same struggle despite having a whack load of great coaching. Is it because I've never ridden the same horse long enough? Or maybe not enough exercises for myself? Too many gymnastics/lines?

I would like to know how people work on developing their eye, what kind of exercises you do, how long it took you to feel good about it, or if it just suddenly one day kicked in?
 

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To have a good eye it takes a lot of practice. Maybe one horse a day is not enough and you might need to ride more. On the flat just do a bunch of canter poles. Canter poles are your best friend when it comes to developing an eye for distances, without compromising your horse. Once you have a better idea of where your horses body is going to be in relation to the stride; any jump regardless of height will be piece of cake. Working more on what happens in between the fences is going to be very beneficial, and this new horse you talk about will help you a bunch. Build canter pole courses with bending lines and combinations.
 

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How soon before the fence are you looking? Do you look through your turns? Are you looking at the fence or gazing off in the distance beyond it? Are you heading to the fence with a quality canter or relying on your horse's adjustability when you get there? Have you taken fences out of the equation and can get the correct strides over ground poles?

I know, lots of questions. My guess it you're overthinking it and have yet to discover a good quality canter will get you the correct distance almost all the time.
 

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How soon before the fence are you looking? Do you look through your turns? Are you looking at the fence or gazing off in the distance beyond it? Are you heading to the fence with a quality canter or relying on your horse's adjustability when you get there? Have you taken fences out of the equation and can get the correct strides over ground poles?

I know, lots of questions. My guess it you're overthinking it and have yet to discover a good quality canter will get you the correct distance almost all the time.

Yesterday I did only ground poles, a line with 4 or 5 strides and another with 2/3. I am able to have a nice quality rhythmic canter, and you're right it gets me there nicely almost every time, but not every time. But still, even just cantering rhythmically around gave me a better feel for that quality canter I need to keep.

I look coming around a turn, I make sure I don't lose impulsion through the turn, I make sure I'm straight at least 2 or 3 strides out, rhythmic the whole time.

I read that article, it mentions looking at the jump instead of beyond it which is definitely counterintuitive and what you're always told not to do, but I see the logic! You need to judge that distance. Very interesting!
 
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