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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We used to own this cremello mare and usually try and go to check up on her. She was a riding horse but now used as a broodmare, we were considering buying her back for a trail horse but now she is injured. First she would not put any weight on it and could not walk. She is now slowly walking on it but her pastern goes all the way to the ground, I thought it was broken. No idea how she injured herself and the guy who has her will not get a vet since she is only one of his many broodmares. I'm trying to get her back from him to take her to a vet, do you guys think she could ever be rode again? Does it seem broken?? He isn't even concerned.. I only see her every 2 or so weeks. She is 7, I don't have many pictures as he doesn't like his horses being photographed. Her Pasterns were ideal before.
 

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looks more like a tendon issue. not only is the fetlock dropped, but her hock seems oddly straight.



Sad. you say she can walk on it now? is she limping? I mean, if he is keeping her to breed, and she is in pain, limping around, I'd consider calling animal control, since that seems like neglect/cruelty.
 

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If that is dropped fetlocks, there is a technical name for it "DSLD"...it is a forever and the start of a potential catastrophic failure of her body = never ridden again and if the ligament/tendon snaps the rest of the way her "ankle" will no longer support her weight...
If that happens if she were mine she would be euthanized, not sure of the pain factor at this point of going forward with more deterioration to the joint area happening.


Her left hind looks not so good either...
If you bought her to give her a kind, safe landing to live out her days fine,...to buy her and think you are going to go galloping down trails...sadly think not anymore.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
She is limping still but bears weight on it, when I first found her like this she would not put any weight on it and could hardly walk. She is heavily bred.. If I can get her depends on the color of her foal. I had the worst case scenario in my mind and already knew that she would likely never sound again but I was hoping she'd atleast be sound as a pasture pet now.
 

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@horselovinguy DSLD is chronic and progressive and I don't think shows so young, it doesn't just happen overnight.

She has a major injury likely tendon I agree, could be something hit her or she just tweaked it too much but that's pretty serious. I'm surprised there's no physical injury like a deep cut or something. I think it's likely her tendon is completely gone, I don't think the bone is broken but tbh that might even be better. TBH this horse NEEDS to see a vet, she very well may never be pasture sound even, tendon injuries are hard enough and this is just- not even there I'm not sure if there's anything to treat, and if you're not willing to buy her back just to have her seen and possibly euthanized (understandable) I would be calling animal control, she is suffering and that is cruelty. I can imagine how much it's effecting the rest of her body attempting to walk around like that. Unfortunately being heavily in foal will only hurt her more. If possible maybe she could even be induced if far enough along. A thought is maybe to get the vet out with him still owning her on your dime? It won't hurt to offer if you're willing, and if he says no call AC.

I doubt she will ever be breeding sound even if pasture sound. If he doesn't want to sell her because he wants to rebreed her he needs to know that's not an option without her seeing a vet and getting an ok.

Please keep us updated, I feel so badly for this young horse and for you. She's lucky to have you trying to help her instead of just having her fate in such a cruel owner's hands. I hate to be fatalistic, but I would be prepared for the worst, but if you can get her at least she will be happy and loved for what time she has left. I hope I am wrong and she can at the least be a pasture pet, but it's highly likely nothing more.

Also, do you know what color the stud is? We may be able to help you guess the foal color before it's born.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you guys. I am still trying to get her even with her injury. I was wishing she'd be fine but I knew in my mind she wouldn't be. Why I came here, problem is he will not sell her until she has the foal. The sire is a blue roan, he wants foals with color. I'll keep y'all updated.
 

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I think it's a tendon injury. If she has had it for a while then the damage is just going to continue to get worse. She needs to be seen by a vet and a treatment plan could be anything from stall rest to surgery but either way - if it IS a tendon injury then it's a long healing process that has no promise of soundness. I have one that severed her tendons, I call her my "20k horse" because her medical bills were right around 12-15k by the time it was all said and done. She is sound to ride but it's a mechanical soundness. She has a permanent hitch in her stride and has lost flexibility.
 

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So...keep thinking about you wanting to take back ownership and goal of riding this mare again in your thoughts...
She is young and as others mentioned DSLD is more often in aged animals...
Certain breeds and bloodlines are prone to this type of problem...
If it is not a injury then it is genetic and she is passing on a weakness with her being bred.
So, that leaves you with a serious injury took place that was never treated, possibly never looked at or cared for.
Once a tear, a rupture takes place scar tissue fills in and is never the same in strength, elasticity or anything..it is a scar. Ugly and just taking up space but not really functioning tissue.
Did she overextend her leg, place it on uneven ground, take a bad step...you're not going to ever know.
A owner who does not take care of their animals, just uses them for a end = breeding baby factory...well, they aren't going to care as long as the mare puts a live one on the ground what happens to her...
If she drops color you'll not see her sold and she will be bred back immediately for another I bet.
I'm not even sure she could stand a live-cover in her current condition...

So...
You have your heart sitting in clear sight of this person...they are going to charge you plenty knowing that.
Make sure you really know what is going on with this horse...no guessing.
Vet out with ultrasound equipment and do the hind legs, both of them.
Troubling is the obvious dropped fetlock/ankle and where exactly the rupture is of the suspensory is what I think too...
Is it higher, is it lower or is it the branch? Or several areas...
What degree is that rupture or tear?
Now go to the other leg and what concerns me as much , maybe more is how much damage is in it because it is supporting so much of the horses weight continually with the other leg virtually non-weight bearing safe at this point...
Figure in the injury has also been during at least one pregnancy and added stresses of carrying a baby...
Your heart is in the right place...
Your mind though needs the facts to be presented so you can acquire the mare or turn the owner in for abusive non-care ongoing that you are witnessing.
With details, facts known you then know where your next step needs to be...
To me, you can forget ever riding this horse...she may be able to live in a pasture till she has a final catastrophic failure take place but have a feeling it has already occurred or is in the process of occurring now.
You probably also saw her at her worst of barely applying weight and limping so badly...
It isn't much better now either if you are honest. Horses are very stoic about showing pain, discomfort as it makes them vulnerable to attack from others...remember that.
With your knowledge known you could acquire the mare and give her a soft landing and ease her pain, her discomfort she has every limping step she takes...
Some hard decisions though face you...pasture puff or euthanasia and which is better for the mare.
Hard for the heart to handle when you are so attached to the animal as you obviously are.
We are the animals advocate though when in our care to do the very best we can for them.
We are their guardians on Earth...for as long or short a time as that is...it is our privilege to call them "ours" till we return them to the pasture of the heavens they go to when they are called home or when we know they need to return home so no more hurt, pain or trauma happens.
Read their eyes, look deep into them...it is a clear picture to their heart and soul...

If you bring her home...get some diagnostics done so you know, know facts..not guess on what is happening to both her hind legs...
Till you have facts for her safety and yours...do not put one once to her back...it may be that that breaks her in half.
If you bring her home, figure a way to get her in a trailer easiest for her cause she can't step up onto nor even walk very well up a ramp...
I wish you the very best in a sad situation. You need some hugs...this is tough and I'm so sorry you are witnessing this.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good and bad news. She had the baby. No milk. Convinced him to let me take care of them.. but he wants her back in 3 weeks. He gave me 50$. He thinks the baby is a buckskin and I'm keeping it that way.. I thought he looks like a blue roan.. I am bringing the vet out tomorrow morning for the mare.. He doesn't want me to bottle feed the baby and she has hardly any milk.. The mare is in horrible shape and has a huge cut on her front leg now too. Poor baby girl, always look into who you sell your animals to!! This is ridiculous! I'm about ready to turn him in! He says she was poisoned by the spray the farmers sprayed in the fields, what an excuse!
 

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I'm so sorry to hear that you and the mare are having to go through this :( and now the little boy too.. absolutely heartbreaking :'(

If I was in your position, I would wait and hear about what the vet has to say then very probably report the guy. If this is the condition of your horse, imagine what his others look and feel like... there is no way she is the only exception. Very saddening.
 

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I'm feeling steamed right now, just reading this. Fifty dollars! and you give her back once you've done all the work!!! Get outta here!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My vet has diagnosed her with DSLD.. said she is the youngest horse he has seen it in. (She is 7 almost 8.) She is on Previcox (I was also given bute but he said Previcox would be better long term.)
He recommends me to wrap it for short periods of time when she is exercising, limit her exercise but stall rest doesn't help. There is no cure to it?! He is also worried her foal might have it when he is older. Her other leg is starting to go down like the first one now.. he told me all I could do is try to keep it stable. She only has 3 weeks of care though. He also mentioned to me that she could be trimmed/shoed a certain way to help. What are the possibilities the foal will have it.. he said it is possibly genetic.
She is getting supplements for milk production, she has milk today and the foal is sucking like crazy! Poor guy was shaken up last night from the trailer ride.
I have never heard of this disease before either.. thank you guys for helping out, these last days have been really stressful for me and for the horses.
 

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So sad. I'm shocked DSLD would come on so suddenly, but I know you don't see her super often. Could be there's an injury on top of it too. It's good in that there is no acute issue however it is chronic and will only get worse, and yes, it is genetic. Idk if there's any way to tell how likely it is the foal will have it.

Did you explain the horses situation to the vet? He may report him himself. I would at the least tell the guy and see what he says (he's breeding defective horses because it IS a genetic condition! I would emphasise that she is worthless and any foals are likely to be too...really butter him up and make him not want her). IF he still refuses I would try reporting him.

The mare has no milk because she's not cared for.

If she doesn't produce more the foal will be in trouble. I would do what you can but I would seriously consider reporting him, and if you haven't spoken to the vet about it I would give him a call. Super cute baby <3, buckskin or smokey black. I hope for smokey black because it can look like a pretty normal bay horse, which he does so far. (If he is buckskin he's SUPER dark). Hopefully the guy won't want him or the trouble of the mare.
 

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So very sorry about the mare. I know I read somewhere there was a theory that hormones could speed up the progress, but no idea if that was someone thinking out loud about their own experience or if someone is doing real research. Heartbreaking either way.

Was the mare out on fescue and that caused her to not have milk?

Foal looks black to me, meaning he would be smoky black and likely roan. Was roan enough 'color' for her owner or was he just wanting buckskin? I hope you wind up with them both..
 

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Mares need lots of calories to produce milk. A run-down, hungry, stressed mare will not produce no matter what you do.

Can you bottle-feed this baby at least partially to ensure he gets enough to eat? I'd report the owner-- I'm actually surprised the vet didn't. DSLD is a condition that affects the legs most visibly, but also the tissues and organs inside the body. With the mare this severe this quickly, she's likely hurting inside, too. DSLD is extremely painful. Unfortunately, there's a high likelihood that the kindest thing to do in this situation is to wean the foal early (4 months or so) and put the mare down at that point. Please, please, please do what you can to ensure the owner doesn't get the mare back only to rebreed her and then just let this mare suffer from this painful condition until she dies on her own. That's just plain cruel.

I'm sorry for you, the mare, and this poor foal.
 

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I'd say cremello was bought for the addition of that cream gene. Not knowing zygosity I went with unknown in the calculator and these were the results. If sire is homozygous and mare carries dominant agouti these are your possibilities -Smokey Blue Roan, Smoky Black, Buckskin Roan, Buckskin, Palomino and possibly Palomino Roan. Roan gets confusing to me at times with how it is passed. Again these depend on zygosity. You know mare is ee CRCR but don't know agouti so could be aa (no buckskins then) or Aa or AA and sire could be EE (no red based babies) or Ee which then leaves the roan. If E is paired with RN then only then only those with dominant extension would get roan if homozygous then red would too. Someone correct me if I am wrong there. The only thing that may not be worth his while would be the black. Do you know the name of the stud or are his color genes tested for and do you know them?


I am so sorry this is happening to this mare. I hope you find a resolution.
 
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