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Hi! So I've had my two geldings together for one year now. From the beginning I never separated them. So when I go out my with my guy, Hersh calls out, runs back and forth, but I'd say it doesn't become dangerous. When I leave my guy alone in the paddock, he really freaks out. And now I'm not quite sure how to fix it. When one horse leaves, should the other go in their stall? Or stay out in the paddock? Is this something that can be fixed? Thanks
 

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Hi Countryjewel. It is a fixable situation.

The easy way is to get a companion animal to stay with the one left behind. In my case, I have a horse that isn't sound for riding. It can be any number of beasties though - donkey, llama, sheep, goat, pony, cow, mini horse. The actual companion would be determined by your budget and how your geldings are likely to interact with it (eg don't get a mini if they would bully and hurt it).

The harder way, because it requires frequent and consistent work from you, is to get them gradually used to one staying and the other going for awhile. Start by taking one horse out and working him by the fence line - a few times of this the other one will start to settle and accept it; when that happens then start to work further away from the fence (you may have to do an advance and retreat technique here); and so on. This one does work and will be successful if you can do this pretty much daily - to be honest anything less will be rather fruitless because of the time lapse between the conditioning episodes.

Alternatively, if you are only doing trail riding, you may want to teach one horse to pony and take him along with you. I used to have to do that many years ago when I just had two horses and wasn't riding them every day because of work and school commitments. My mare was a seasoned pro (being an OTTB) at ponying so it was a relaxing and enjoyable thing to do. You would want at least one of your geldings solid and drama free before trying this.

With regard to putting one in the stall, that is not unlike leaving one alone in the paddock (and depending on the individual personalities, may raise the anxiety levels even more) so I don't know if your success rate would be any better doing it that way or not - I suspect it may not.
 

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Very good advice was given... it all depends on the horse and if time to do so. A companion is great, easy, but costs. I know we have plenty... I freaked the few times we trailered and left one in pasture... trainer lived close and said horse would be fine in 15 minutes but would check on... she was fine and not overly crazy... he workers horse riding if buddy sour at training close to other horse... as far as one in pasture never had a problem he let's them run around in pen... though not sure he had any that may hurt themselves... at a show one of mine bucked in pen I was worried sent my dad to talk to him near pen he calmed as I rode made... hope that helps
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Start by taking them out of each others sight at home. One in barn, or tie one up on one side of barn and other on far side.

Also can throw over some hay to one left.

Would just have to be dealt with by them though. So might as well toughen up on them now.
 

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I just cannot let any horse tell me what I can and what I cannot do. I also will not allow a horse to run a fence or walk a stall. If I have horses that think they cannot be separated, I just tie them up in safe places out of sight and sound of each other. I tie high and to a safe place and keep an eye on them until they get over it.

This can mean tying for 2 hours, 8 hours or all day for 2 or 3 days. They WILL all get over it. They get to the point where they whinny a couple of times and stand completely still and relaxed. Then, any time I take one away, I watch the other and tie it up if it starts running a fence or gets hysterical.

We have done this with show trained horses that could not be shown or even hauled because they had become so buddy sour. They all got over it and became the best horse that they could be. One cutting mare went on to win a lot of money. She had become completely un-ridable unless her buddy was right in front of her. They even tried to make the buddy into a turn-back horse so they could show her, but her buddy was a clutzy duntz that could not stop or turn around with a dairy cow, let alone go to the cutting pen as a turn-back horse. She fought the separation for 3 days before she gave it up. She turned into a completely different horse.
 

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I like Cherie's solution. For years I had a gelding and a mare. I never sold the gelding but the mares would come and go as I would train them and sell and get another.

Every time I rode the mare out, the gelding would carry on.. neighing and running around the pasture (but never running himself into a lather.. or anything dangerous). I just ignored him and went out with the mare. He would settle when it started to look like REAL work. I like Cherie's advice better.. but that was 40+ years ago and it was what I did.

Interestingly, when I rode the Gelding out and left the mare behind, no matter the mare, they would give a couple of obligatory neighs and then be fine. Sort of like "Good. He's gone. Now I can go do what I want."

I totally get the mare's behavior.
 

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Chevaux gave some great advice, having a companion animal can help a lot, but often the horses will still go nuts for their long time buddy even with a new companion.
I would recommend putting your horse in a stall, because it is a safer to have him there if he is freaking out than in his paddock where he might fall, try to jump the fence, etc.
The best way to get the horses used to being apart is to separate them regularly. Start with a short time apart and increase the time you have them separated. They will be under stress through this process, its basically inevitable, but in my opinion, I would look for the method that causes your horses the least amount of stress.
Being buddy sour is a natural thing, horses don't want to be alone, their instincts tell them that being alone being means in danger.
 
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