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So they say to clean the sheath every 6 months... but what about wild horses? Nobody cleans their sheath, and how many of them die from some sort of cancer because of it?
The only thing I can think of is that there are different chemicals and what not and feed that could cause a buildup? Not sure.. and does the actual sheath need to be cleaned or just the "bean"?
 

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This is *SO* funny cause I just thought about this yesterday.... lol i'm interested to see what people say!
 

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i think it stays a lot cleaner if they are 'using it'
 

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Wild horses don't get any treatment for anything, so they can and do die from disease, infection, etc.

Domesticated horses live a vastly different lifestyle than a wild horse. They are asked to work and get sweaty multiple times per week. They are confined to spaces much smaller than the areas wild horses roam. They get fed an artificial diet. They are kept on soft ground or dirt --- these are ALL perfect breeding grounds for smegma (junk) buildup in a horse's sheath.
Anyways, wild horses can't get cleaned, and so can suffer for it. But they also live in different conditions, so likely have a different pattern for buildup as well.

i think it stays a lot cleaner if they are 'using it'
Yes and no... kinda. haha.
 

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Depends on the horse. Some horses are naturally clean, but should get a clean yearly, some need it every month or so.
As a general rule, 6 months is a good timeframe.
 

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This is a stupid question, I know.. but I havent ever owned a gelding, so thats why.. what is a bean?
 

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The "bean" is a waxy buildup for gunk that settles in his penis. If left unchecked, it can cause alight discomfort or extreme pain.
I clean my geldings every 6 months after a good workout. Use rubber gloves, LOTS of KY and warm water and get in there. it's gross but for their health, it needs to be done. if it grosses you out buy a nice natural sheath cleaner, spray it up in there and it will take care of itself (mostly, you'll still need to loosen stuff off for him!)
My vet told me horses in the wild "use it" so it helps flush them out a little, but it does not make them any less prone to diseases and such ;)
 

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It depends on the horse. I have my vet check my gelding's sheath every time he does his teeth, and he's never had to have his cleaned.

Mares are also supposed to have their udders cleaned every six months or so, and my mare's are so dirty that I have to clean them at LEAST once a week.

Wild horses DO suffer from a lot of things that domestic horses don't have to worry about. But you really can't compare one to another... They're so different. Wild horses don't even have to have their feet trimmed or their teeth floated. They're just much hardier.
 

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Feral horses die between 10 and 15 years old because nature is cruel, and only the young and strong survive.

Domesticated horses, with proper nutrition, medical care, and upkeep, can live up to 40-45 years.

A mustang, if taken off the range and domesticated, has as much chance as living a long healthy life as one born in a barn.

Trying to continually compare horses who have to find their own way in the world versus those who are taken care of by humans, is a futile effort.

The only reason our domestic horses live so long is because of the care they receive from their human handlers. If they were thrown out into nature, their lives would be as brutal and short as their feral cousins.

Feral horses have smegma build up, too. They also have leg, feet, and back problems, as well as contract diseases. The only difference is that they don't live long enough to get old. Once a physical disability raises it's ugly head, the feral horse becomes food for a large predator.
 

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Smegma buildup also has a lot to do with the ground that the horse is on. Here in Utah very few people clean thier horses sheaths. We have pretty hard ground and rarely does a "bean" form in a sheath. When I lived in the Sandhills of Nebraska I had to clean the sheath about every two weeks and would get a pretty good sized bean out of it.
 

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Feral horses die between 10 and 15 years old because nature is cruel, and only the young and strong survive.

Domesticated horses, with proper nutrition, medical care, and upkeep, can live up to 40-45 years.

A mustang, if taken off the range and domesticated, has as much chance as living a long healthy life as one born in a barn.

Trying to continually compare horses who have to find their own way in the world versus those who are taken care of by humans, is a futile effort.

The only reason our domestic horses live so long is because of the care they receive from their human handlers. If they were thrown out into nature, their lives would be as brutal and short as their feral cousins.

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you have no idea how many times I have said the same thing to people. Barefoot trimming is fine but don't think that mustangs have perfect feet and are never lame. There is just nobody to see them when they limp.
 

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Feral horses die between 10 and 15 years old because nature is cruel, and only the young and strong survive.

Domesticated horses, with proper nutrition, medical care, and upkeep, can live up to 40-45 years.

A mustang, if taken off the range and domesticated, has as much chance as living a long healthy life as one born in a barn.

Trying to continually compare horses who have to find their own way in the world versus those who are taken care of by humans, is a futile effort.

The only reason our domestic horses live so long is because of the care they receive from their human handlers. If they were thrown out into nature, their lives would be as brutal and short as their feral cousins.

Feral horses have smegma build up, too. They also have leg, feet, and back problems, as well as contract diseases. The only difference is that they don't live long enough to get old. Once a physical disability raises it's ugly head, the feral horse becomes food for a large predator.
This is what I was trying to say, but SR put it so much better.
 

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Feral horses die between 10 and 15 years old because nature is cruel, and only the young and strong survive.

Domesticated horses, with proper nutrition, medical care, and upkeep, can live up to 40-45 years.

A mustang, if taken off the range and domesticated, has as much chance as living a long healthy life as one born in a barn.

Trying to continually compare horses who have to find their own way in the world versus those who are taken care of by humans, is a futile effort.

The only reason our domestic horses live so long is because of the care they receive from their human handlers. If they were thrown out into nature, their lives would be as brutal and short as their feral cousins.

Feral horses have smegma build up, too. They also have leg, feet, and back problems, as well as contract diseases. The only difference is that they don't live long enough to get old. Once a physical disability raises it's ugly head, the feral horse becomes food for a large predator.
Well said SR!
 

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Meh, I just get tired of people romanticizing the feral horses.

They're really no different than our domestic, barn born animals.

In fact, most of what people call 'mustangs' are runaways, culls, or abandoned horses from breeding programs, old Army remount units, and ranches.

These animals have been getting an influx of new blood pretty much every 30 to 50 years or so since the beginning of U.S. colonization.

A pure strain of mustang really doesn't exist, but it makes for better press if people think that somehow these animals are 'more special' than our regular, domestic bred horses.
 

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Meh, I just get tired of people romanticizing the feral horses.

They're really no different than our domestic, barn born animals.

In fact, most of what people call 'mustangs' are runaways, culls, or abandoned horses from breeding programs, old Army remount units, and ranches.

These animals have been getting an influx of new blood pretty much every 30 to 50 years or so since the beginning of U.S. colonization.

A pure strain of mustang really doesn't exist, but it makes for better press if people think that somehow these animals are 'more special' than our regular, domestic bred horses.

Exactly, I wish the government would spend as much on my kids education as they do keeping a bunch of inbred junk horses alive.
 

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Exactly, I wish the government would spend as much on my kids education as they do keeping a bunch of inbred junk horses alive.
The problem is.... there are not a bunch of crazy loud people who will scream and toss a fit if your kids do not get their education the way they will if their beloved wild horsies are not treated like the royalty they imagine they must be.

:roll:

I totally miss why anyone thinks that a bunch of feral horses are any great symbol of anything.

But.......................
 

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Natural breeding keeps those parts in working order, and it's the same with mares. It's just like not having their hooves trimmed because the rough terrain keeps them worn down.
 

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I have no problem with keeping a few horses out on the range to be part of our heritage but htere are tens of thousands of "wild" horses in feedlots all over the country just waiting to die of old age. More than half of the total budget for the BLM is spent feeding these horses intead of managing land.
 
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