The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I am completely new to horses and this forum and i just had a few questions about Shetland ponies. I’m not sure if i will get one that’s why i’m asking so many questions haha. I don’t have space to keep a Shetland Pont where I live, and I’d like to keep her at a stable where i still would have to feed, groom, and interact with her, and all of the stables ive looked at already do those things and i’d just like her to stay there and nothing else. So what would be my best bet with that? Also, how much monthly would a Shetland pony cost (not including the pony itself) I was also wondering how much the average shetland costs? I don’t have too much money and have loved horses ever since i was a child. I’ve ridden horses before and i know the basics of horse care. I would love to have a companion due to my major depressive disorder. Thank you in advance 🙂
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,921 Posts
Hello, welcome to the forum!

Shetlands are still horses, to all intents & purposes, albeit dwarves who are often disguised under a shagpile! :lol:

So... all horses are herd animals, they do best living in a herd. At least having some live in company. All horses are built to do best with free movement, not to be kept locked in a stable or yard. All horses are grazers, built to 'trickle feed' - having near constant small amounts of forage going through their system. They need around 2%bwt daily in forage, and it should be free access or fed little & often, so they don't go hungry for long periods. All horses need worming, hooves attended to regularly - generally 4-6 weeks - and teeth checked/attended around yearly. Most horses will need some form of nutritional supp, to ensure a well balanced diet. Some horses(not gen 'easy keeper' ponies, but often those in hard work...) will need extra calories to what forage can provide, in order to be in good condition, so they can require 'hard feeding'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
Many people do not have room to keep horses at home so they board.

What you are probably looking for is something called "rough board" where the owner does most of the work, supplies the feed, etc. Some barns offer it others do not.

A pony eats less than a horse but otherwise many fixed costs are the same -- vaccines, routine tests, hoof trimming, etc. Shetlands are winter-hardy and can live out year round in most climates, so you might want to find a pasture with another quiet friendly horse or two instead of a stable with stalls and turnout. That would undoubtedly be cheaper as well. Costs vary so extremely around the country it's hard to give any kind of a figure. But any horse is a large expense to maintain, and then there are always the unforeseen extra costs -- a sick or hurt pony can rack up the expenses with astonishing rapidity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
A pony will cost the same as a full sized horse. I don't know anywhere that gives discounts for ponies.


How much it will cost will depend on your location and the amenities. Around me board is anywhere from $200 for pasture board without facilities to $800+ for stall + turnout + facilities + other services. The thing about ponies is you can't just toss them out on a pasture. They need their intake watched, otherwise they are liable to become overweight and bring all the complications that come along with that. They either need restricted hay, grazing muzzles, or rotation in and off pasture.


You want to look at boarding advertising as self-care. That's the style you want. But I will say, it's nice having someone else get up at 6am when it's a blizzard to feed your horse. Lol.



Expenses you need to be aware of: Farrier every 6-8 weeks (~$40), vet care(deworming 2-4x a year, vaccines 1-2x a year, teeth floating 1x year), if you need to buy your own feed(some boarding places include that), tack and equipment. Then there is always the surprise vet visits. Those can be anything from a colic requiring surgery to a scratched cornea or a skin fungus and everything in betwen. You might get lucky and never need a non-routine vet call. You might get an accident prone, sensitive pony. No way to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,702 Posts
I also hope that you get your pony!! I don’t know anything about boarding, so I can’t answer that question. They don’t take much hay, that I can tell you.

When little girl bought hers, just a broodmare at that point, she spent $700. She broke her as a project and sold her, which brought her $2,500. So, it kind of depends on what you are looking for.

The only reason Moon sold so cheaply was because little girl had yet to make a name for herself for selling a nice horse. A person who is known for training ponies, around here, can sell a broke pony at a higher price, sometimes around 6k.

You should be able to find one pretty cheap though if you are willing to train it yourself. Moon was such a good pony. We loved her. I hope you get one as lovey as she was!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
I currently have a Shetland pony for my daughter and the costs are the same as my saddle horses. For the area I live, farriers cringed when I told them I bought a pony, said they wouldn't trim her (they assumed she was a typical pain in the butt Shetland). My regular farrier agreed to take her on, but charges me the same as my horses because ending over to trim her is hard on his back. Get down low is way harder on him than trimming a horse. A lot of this will depend on where you live.

As me toned before, ponies cant free graze or they will founder. They eat less than a horse, but tend to get fat easy so you have to watch what they eat or they can end up with health problems.

As for purchase cost, the ponies I have were for my kids to ride and when I was pony shopping last year, ponies were $2,000- $10,000 for trained ride alone. If you are looking for a pet as a companion, you should be able to find one much cheaper.

Good luck!!

As for purchase price,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I know of a few shetties who are kept at a discounted price, however, this is because the owner owns 2 of them and keeps them in the same stall (its still a fairly big stall) and field... they have enough room in the stall together, unlike 2 horses

oh and I think people also call the type of boarding 'DIY livery"- though that might just be about who picks up your horses poo
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top