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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. I am fostering a horse and the rescue was talking about putting shoes with studs for the winter. Her hoofs aren't the greatest and she has been of HF Focus to try to get them into better shape. I hear she is a bear for the farrier too. I prefer her not to have shoes. I think the natural hoof is always the best choice and with boots if needed for riding in rough terrain (which we won't be doing that at all.)

I would like to get some opinions. Ultimately, I don't own her but I still will be paying for the farrier and shoes just like I do for her feed, board, shavings, board, etc. (except vet.)

Debbie
 

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Hi,

If she is expected to work in an environment where extra grip is needed, then studs may be in order. You can get studs for hoof boots, but TBH have no idea how effective they are - boots aren't generally great in really slippery situations - & not having heard any reports about how good they are, I suspect they're possibly not great. Easycare do a 'Grip' boot, specifically for slippery situations though, that IME is fine for normal riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They arent going to put shoes on her. She won't be getting worked at all unless just some paddock ground work. We don't ride her right now but with good luck and some work with a trainer we are hoping to do that soon but never in bad coditions.

Thank you for your feedback!
 

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One of the horses at a local barn was shod with "winter shoes" they had some kind of sharp metal coating for traction. She kicked another horse and ripped the flesh off of him with those shoes. Just a thought...
 

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Some studs (larger ones for ice ) can be hard on the legs because of the severe grip all the time, whether th horse is in ice or not.Large piles of borium welded on the shoes can also be hard on the legs.

A LITTLE borium welded on the shoe heels on small low dots can be fine, OR I usually recommend just replacing the regular heel nails with a couple of "traction nails" if the horses living and working conditions may vary throughout a shoeing period. These are just horseshoe nails that have had tungsten carbide dots welded on to the heads. They cost about a dollar each so two on each hoof would be about 8 bucks extra in a shoeing .
 

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When I shod my own horses I used an acetylene torch and added just a little borium to the heel branches of the shoes when slippery conditions were up. This could be mud season or snow and ice season. Snow and ice season I preferred the natural, unshod hoof unless it was truly icy OR I was going to really work the horse in winter (foxhunting and so forth). In the snow/ice season I also used snow ball pads to prevent ice balls in the shoes.

the trick was the borium. On dry ground you still wanted the foot to slip a little to reduce impact on joints.. but enough borium so on ice the horse did not "lose its grip."
 
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