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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
At the first barn I went to I was taught to do long, hard strokes with the hard brush and short, soft flicks with the soft brush. Yesterday, I heard a coach at the barn I'm currently at explaining how to groom to a novice student and she told the student the opposite. I was just wondering how you groom/use the hard and soft brushes? Thanks!

~Pine
 

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I vary with the dandy brush but I was taught a shorter flicking movement.

I use long, firm strokes with the body brush. One or two strokes on the horse, then one or two strokes over the metal curry comb to clean the brush, then back to the horse and so on.

In general, body brush, comb or fingers for the mane. On the body, I start with the rubber curry comb, or sometimes the plastic one, to loosen mud and hair, I move on to the dandy brush, then the body brush. Always working from top to bottom, front to back with the hair. I finish with a stable rubber to polish. I use the body brush and wipes/clean cloths on the face, nose and eyes. I was taught to use cotton wool for the eyes but I hate the feeling. I use a separate sponge for under the tail. Lastly, I pick out the feet.

The metal curry comb is only used to clean the body brush it's never used on the horse. I never use plastic curry combs on manes, tails or faces. I avoid ticklish, clipped and sensitive parts with the dandy brush and limit the use of the body brush on horses living outside.

I think everyone has their own way of doing it.
 
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The metal curry comb is only used to clean the body brush it's never used on the horse.
I keep reading this in horse books published in England. But in the "western world" where I am, everyone used the metal curry on the horse. I personally use the metal curry on the horse. What kind of metal curry are you referring to?

I use this, and maybe I shouldn't admit this, but if I could only have one grooming tool (besides a hoofpick) this is what it would be. Great for shedding, mud, you name it. But I always wondered if this is the forbidden "metal curry" everyone talks about?

1107164


Or are you talking about this perhaps? I have one of those too, and never knew what to do with it.
1107165


So maybe that's to clean brushes? I use the top curry for bush cleaning too, but I guess I know the purpose of the bottom one now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I keep reading this in horse books published in England. But in the "western world" where I am, everyone used the metal curry on the horse. I personally use the metal curry on the horse. What kind of metal curry are you referring to?

I use this, and maybe I shouldn't admit this, but if I could only have one grooming tool (besides a hoofpick) this is what it would be. Great for shedding, mud, you name it. But I always wondered if this is the forbidden "metal curry" everyone talks about?

View attachment 1107164

Or are you talking about this perhaps? I have one of those too, and never knew what to do with it (and the horse's don't like it).
View attachment 1107165

So maybe that's to clean brushes? I use the top curry for bush cleaning, but I guess I know the purpose of the bottom one now......hmm.
I use the top one to get serious mud off but not in sensitive parts, but other than that I also use it to clean brushes.
 

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@trailhorserider The bottom rectanglular one. There probably is a cultural/tool difference. Here in Scotland, or even the UK, we wouldn't use a metal one on a horse. I've no doubt that some do but generally we're taught that they are used for cleaning the body brush. I remember when I was a kid, one of the stable lads was shouted at and sent out of the yard for the day for using one on a horse.
 

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Here's how I groom:
Rubber curry, moving in small circles on barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck
Stiff bristled dandy, short flicks along barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck
Soft bristled dandy, long firm strokes, barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck, legs, face

Right now, since it's winter, before I ride, I just use a metal curry comb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's how I groom:
Rubber curry, moving in small circles on barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck
Stiff bristled dandy, short flicks along barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck
Soft bristled dandy, long firm strokes, barrel, shoulders, back, hips, neck, legs, face

Right now, since it's winter, before I ride, I just use a metal curry comb.
I do it in the same order but short flicks with the soft brush.
 

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I do small circles with a decent amount of pressure with a rubber curry glove. Because the glove is soft, I can use it everywhere. With a harder curry comb I would probably only use it like that on the large muscled areas because it wouldn't feel good on bone or tendon.
I use the dandy brush -- stiff, long bristles -- to flick the dust and loose hair off.
I use the body brush -- shorter bristles, softer than the dandy brush -- to polish the coat in long strokes.

In summer I often skip the dandy brush because there isn't as much crud coming loose from the coat, and the body brush does a good enough job.
 
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