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We have all the equipment, but the pump itself was 10k when ours went out.
 
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When my late hubby was alive, he had his drillers license, so we did it all ourselves. But since he's passed on, I have to hire it done.
Used to take us all day to pull the pump and put a new pump on, and set it back in the hole the next day.
Makes for LONG days.
 

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It does!! It takes a lot of work. Ours is an old pivot well, and the others we have done are pivot wells, so you can imagine. It’s often a weeklong job.
 

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I'd keep the well water city water is nasty tasting. Here horse pasture corrals have to be 50 feet from well. 100 feet from septic system.

Generator to run well pump needs to be 220. We have a generator that runs our well ,septic pump out, refrigerator an freezer.

Power loss in winter doesn't effect heating our house. Both heating systems require no power. Power goes out when 20 below zero, house will get seriously cold an fast with no heat source.
 

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The water crisis is not some far off thing - it is happening right now. My sister lives in Cape Town and they were a few days off from switching off the water to the entire city and they didn’t have a clue when they would switch it back on. Don’t give up your water.



It may sound like “But Africa is like that” - it isn’t really. Cape Town is a big, sophisticated city and never had a problem like this in its history.

Curiously, if the waters is switched off the sewer system will be in big trouble as well - sewage systems are designed to work with a specific levels of water flow. If there is no water the sewage stops working as well.
 

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Within the last year our neighbors property took a lightning strike....that transferred the charge through the ground and that burnt out our well pump. We are about 1/2 acre from their home where our properties come together...
Charred the pump, charred all the lines of power that went from house to well to make it work....
Of course it was discovered at dinner hour when I turned on the tap and nothing....before that no idea there was a issue since we have a pressure tank of good size that had to be drained down to find we had a problem.
Well drillers I spoke with at 5:30 in the afternoon arrived at 11:56PM... and worked fast and furious till nearly 4:00AM to get our house water running...
When you have the volume of lightning strikes as we do in this state...well-drillers are busy, busy, busy.
My bill wasn't terrible for all of what they did...$4,800 but was not a planned expense and hurt.
The neighbors home lost 3/4 power to their home, lost water, lost every appliance and more...to the tune of over $27,000.....
FYI from the well-drillers...submit a claim to your homeowners company and minus deductible should cover the balance of work done if it was emergent in nature as ours was. That was something I did not know and was grateful to learn.
And yes, because of hurricanes and just bad wind storms/events we can go days with no power we do have generators and now we have that cable and house power disconnect so we can power our well if a power outage to water the horses, store more water for flushing toilets and take cold showers feel glorious when you haven't showered in 5 days....
Last hurricane that was significant put us out for 10 days... the fire department was going to homes and filling livestock tanks to keep the animals alive with a water source. I see several of those farms now have some windmills and enormous tanks beside the ordinary ones so not caught again in such dire for the animal situations.
It isn't just freezing cold or lightning strikes that can create issue...wells just wear out too needing some TLC so indeed it isn't bad to have a alternate source of water available is my thought.
Any idea of how old the well pump is AC?
The guys who came to our aid that night said in our area 10 - 15 years is average for a normal home with 3 people in it, so if a older pump...another thing to look into. :rolleyes: After that the pumps may not be as efficient and reliable for many reasons we were told.:eek:
So much "hidden" when you go from a suburban existence to more rural and larger lands owned you suddenly become responsible for more "necessities" to have a home surrounded by acreage.
🐴... jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
That's a good question @horselovinguy . I got the well inspected when we moved in (surprisingly this was not required by the county and even the realtor seemed surprised that I wanted it) and I'd have to look at the report and see what it says. Well, first I'd have to find the darn thing. I know they looked at water quality, flow rate, and depth, but I don't remember if they looked at the pump mechanism. That's crazy what some of you guys are posting, paying to get it fixed. That is a huge chunk of money.
 

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They are not going to look at the pump when you have your well inspected. That means they would have to pull all of the piping up to get to the pump. Where I live they charge by the pipe foot - so if you well is 150 ft down then they will charge X by 150 or so.

I second well water. City water charges you by the meter flow and watering horses and a garden or anything else adds up.
 

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As for power, if I know a hurricane or snowstorm is coming then I fill a bathtub for the toilets and I have a 100 gallon tub in the barn that I fill for the horses. That way I can fill their water buckets. When Isabelle hit us we were out of power for 10 days and we had no generator at the time so I ended up buying trash cans and driving to my parents house (they had a generator) so I could fill the cans and water the horses. It was extra work but not really that huge of a deal.
 

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The well inspection I had for the property I ended up not buying gave flow rates and stuff like that. The depth to water was based on when they drilled it, which was in state records (only for some wells). No promises about the pump or what the current water level was. That was one of the risks, although not why we ended up not buying.
 

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FYI, well drillers do not typically set pumps. There are pump outfits that do that.
We did it because we had/have our own machine so could do it ourselves.

It's always a good idea to have a well inspected when you buy a place. It's also a good idea to have a copy of the well log. That shows you what the driller went thru in the different layers before he hit water. It will show you the static level in the well as well. All this is something every land owner should know.
 

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Personally, I would do the well and municipal water on separate systems...if permitted.
That way in case of power outage you have water as the municipality is paid to furnish water...
Rates vary depending upon area.
When we lived on LI, with lawn sprinklers and a home of 3 doing all those usual things a family does...our water bill for 3 months was about $60....
Now where I live, we have a well and only costs us electric to power the motor...
Those on municipal water pay $100 per month is what I've been told by friends who have it.
That is no livestock animals, but more a suburban feel of average sized 1/4 - 1/3 acre homesite....
Here homes tied into that municipality system are not permitted a well in operation for the back-flush and contamination chance, period.
Seems it is very locale specific to what is allowed and what is not...

You may be fretting and over-thinking this and get to that new home and this all for naught... :rolleyes:
Be informed, but not look for ulcer issues and cross them when and only if they arrive..
🐴.... jmo...
 

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It's a funny question to consider when you've lived as many years as I have with no option for "city water" 😉 Making sure the well is good is one of the first considerations when looking at a house to buy. Not much to add, except I too couldn't imagine giving up a water source. Or thinking well water tastes bad. But we've always had artesian wells.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Well this is interesting. I just talked to the water district and the first lady I talked to said yes I'd have to decommission the well except for irrigation. Then I asked her, what about watering horses? And she said she wasn't sure so she'd transfer me to someone else. He told me that the water district doesn't actually care if I keep my well or not -- I just have to install two things to prevent backflow from the well into the public water. Although he also told me how much it would cost to get the water turned on -- about $14k. And that doesn't include laying lines to the house.

He did say that I should call the public health district to make sure they didn't have any objections, but he didn't think they would.

I'll talk to them, but @horselovinguy looks like you were right again -- maybe it's not anything to worry about in the first place. In my defense, the neighbors did tell me that's how it was. But I guess they were wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
The other thing this guy told me, that I thought was interesting, is that the county has very uneven rain distribution, due to the rain shadow. I mean, I kind of knew that, but I didn't know it was so significant. They have a well in the SW part of the county where it rains over 60 inches a year, but where we'll live it only rains about 30 inches. This is within one narrow county! They are planning on expanding their infrastructure to harvest more water from that area and be able to move it to the drier parts of the county (I had asked him about resource depletion, since Kitsap is one of three counties in Washington state that doesn't get any water runoff from mountains, and it's also experiencing rapid population growth).

If I don't have to decommission the well I won't, but I'm making a mental note that the aquifer where I live is going to be recharged a lot more slowly than the aquifer that's the source of the city (really, county) water. So, it may be at some point that my well goes dry and then I have to dig deeper or switch to county water. Good to be aware.
 
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AC, I’d personally keep the well. The aquifer that serves the city and county will be serving a great deal more people.
We have a very high water table here; our well is only forty feet deep. I believe that Michigan has more private wells than any other state.
We do have to soften our water, due to high lime content, but we have a bypass faucet at the kitchen sink for drinking water and watering plants and of course the outdoor faucets are bypassed.
For those like me who can’t afford a whole house generator but have a portable one, I highly recommend a Gentran box. An electrician installs it and a cord runs through the basement into the garage, where we run our generator (doors open of course!) and plugs into your generator when the power goes out. It can power five things: in our house, we use it for the sump pump, well pump, furnace, refrigerator and television. It also powers anything on the same circuits. It’s attached to the breaker box and you just flip the breaker switch to what you want to power.
It’s been a lifesaver for us.
 
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