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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am really stuck on the idea to get mare at least 2 times in her life she is a rescue one she is 14year now in 2020

For more information why i want to breeding her at least 2 times into her life go seeying my first post go chekings alls the questions that where asked i responded.
 

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I can understand wanting to have a foal from her, since you love her so much. But think about the risk to her -- I've heard a lot of really sad stories where people did this (bred their mare because they wanted a foal from her) and the mare ended up dying. Can you imagine how you would feel if that happened? If your actions contributed directly to the death of this horse you love so much? If it were me, I would not risk it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can understand wanting to have a foal from her, since you love her so much. But think about the risk to her -- I've heard a lot of really sad stories where people did this (bred their mare because they wanted a foal from her) and the mare ended up dying. Can you imagine how you would feel if that happened? If your actions contributed directly to the death of this horse you love so much? If it were me, I would not risk it.
but the thing is my vet would be taking all the year she is in foalling gestion because they are used to having first time mare in gestions and they are all living today that it is more if she would having health issues firstly i would get a really good check up to really seeying if she can supporting a foal at least .

If my vet tell me she can supporting one and her body is in really good shape to keeping a foal i would give a go
if my vet tell me she cannot supporting one foal i will not getting her in gestion for her health and body to suffering .
if he tell me we can trying taking a egg from her and the sperms of the stud and waits to see if is takes well i would give it a go to getting it from a surroget mother and when the foal would be born we would get my mare like if she giving birth while her foal to get her to bonding with her foal for the first time.
 

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I think it's great that you have a good vet who is willing to be involved.

Since you're planning this for several years in advance, maybe in the meantime you can find someone who has a foal you can work with, so you get some experience with that. I've heard that raising foals can be hard. I mean, knowing when and how to discipline them. And when it's time to introduce things, and how to introduce them so that the foal isn't scared.
 

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^Yup, another good consideration. It's very easy to create a monster, & also to cause lasting serious injury to malleable bodies, if you don't know what you're doing.

OP you said she's 14yo now - if you're adamant about breeding, why not look into getting her in foal now/soon, rather than waiting until she's much older? Even with a good vet on side, it's still a big risk for an older maiden mare.
 

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If I am understanding and following you correctly, you are now referring to AI...artificial insemination.
Harvesting a egg from your mare and pairing with a sperm of a selected stallion...this costs a lot of money and is only done successfully that I know of by fertility specialist vets.
So fast forward that you have found a perfect surrogate mare, have made the investment for mare care of when your mare is harvested and the implanted mare to have the very best of care to carry full term with hopefully no issues...

The time of birth now arrives...
You do recognize the surrogate mare is the momma, not your mare.
Your mare means nothing as far as the care of, the feeding of this baby...in fact your mare could go after the baby possibly in anger and the surrogate mare go after your mare for getting near her baby..
There is a very large difference in human babies being given over to a new family immediately than what you are referring to doing with a animal that needs to nurse from the animal who was pregnant cause your mare is "dry" so no bonding in that sense are you going to do honestly.
Its not so easy to have babies and several mares involved with AI...
You have a bunch of total unknowns with your scenario as I read it...you have more expenses than I think you truly have figured for and you still have nothing guaranteed but you paid out a ton of money and no live animal till on the ground and actually even then stuff goes wrong in the best of best cases and animals are lost to death.

There is still risk to your mare when the egg is harvested...just different kind of risk now.
There is still anesthesia and that itself is a risk...this is a form of surgical procedure for each mare to endure and recover.
I for one would be doing a lot more research about what is involved for each animal, the laboratory costs and the total care needs and associated costs of doing what you propose...and you have to have the right boarding situation, knowledgeable handlers and caregivers in place for the best chance outcome to arrive.
I wish you good luck in your dream.
🐴 ...
 

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At 14 now you're looking at the end of her most productive, fertile years. At 17 less fertile on top of never being bred before which makes a difference as said before.

How fit is your mare? Are you looking to live cover, AI? What makes her breedable? Would flushing her and using a recip be an option?

A good repro vet can make the difference between a good, safe experience or not.

ETA: I didn't refresh the page before I posted. Everyone else covered what I was getting at
 
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While having a good vet is a great start that is no guarantee of a successful pregnancy. Even the best of vets have mares that don't take or have situations where all their special
expertise doesn't work. Even with a vet on hand there can be loss. Loss of foal, loss of momma or loss of both. Those of us that have been there will tell you it is one of the most awful helpless feelings in the world and those that haven't that tell you the same can only imagine a horror they would never want to inflict. Only you can decide if the risk is worth taking. None of it is cheap. It all comes with a cost and that cost is typically in the thousands when all is said and done.

I think most of get the wanting of a piece of our treasured companions but there are better ways to preserve the memories.
 

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Breeding a foal can be very costly, I read from somewhere before that it's around 8000 USD to 9000 USD, thats the cost for one foal. You will literally find horses and foals from other people for much much cheaper.

I'm not an expert on the matter, but I do believe breeding your own horses is rarely a good idea. Your horse is already a rescue and a mixbreed so the foal is not gonna sell for much. When you want to breed a your mare there would have to be some out standing qualities to her, like movement or conformation.

Since your horse is old I don't think it's a worthy risk. If you want a foal you can buy one second hand, without having to pay for all the expenses... There just needs to be a proper reason for breeding your horse, other than you wanting a newborn foal.
 

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If you wait to put the mare in foal until she's 17 your chances go way down for having a successful outcome. She may not get in foal, she may not carry to term, she may get in foal but abort before the 2nd trimester, and of course, she could die giving birth.

I'll tell you as a stallion owner, I would not accept your mare as a 17 year old maiden. I also don't accept grade mares to breed to my stallion. Even at 14, you're past the prime breeding age for her and I would tell you that your chances aren't great.

If you could flush eggs and impregnate the eggs and then put them in a recip mare to carry the foal, your chances are better, but that's very expensive to go that route for a grade mare.

I understand wanting a foal or 2 out of her, she's very cute, but my very best advice to you would be, take the money you would spend on trying to get her in foal and go buy a recently weaned foal. You can get the breed you want, the color, pattern, sex, size, all the things you want in a foal and you don't have to waste money trying to get the mare in foal and maybe not succeeding. And you won't jeopardize your mare. You'll get an adorable little foal to play with and raise how you want and you get to keep your mare for riding and loving on.
 

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There just needs to be a proper reason for breeding your horse, other than you wanting a newborn foal.
Agree, but I believe her reason is to have it to 'remember' her mare when the mare's gone. So she's not planning on selling it. But the horse's age, that OP says for some reason she want at least 2 foals and other comments, about surrogate mothers etc, make me think she has not yet done any research into breeding. Perhaps OP this is the first place you've voiced these desires? And so you just don't yet understand what it all entails, both health-wise for the horses or money-wise, regarding either mare or foal. So OP, I'd suggest you do lots of research, ask all these questions of actual breeders and breeding-specialist vets. By all means, I wouldn't advise you just take our words for stuff.

I do also suggest you do consider how saleable or otherwise the foal would be, which will have to include bringing it up to be fit and healthy and ensuring it's well trained enough - which will probably include hiring a trainer, more $$ - because to be responsible about it, you need to seriously consider all the 'what ifs', such as you can no longer afford to keep the horses - if they're not worth anything to people, because of health, soundness or behaviour, then... the end is nigh for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think it's great that you have a good vet who is willing to be involved.

Since you're planning this for several years in advance, maybe in the meantime you can find someone who has a foal you can work with, so you get some experience with that. I've heard that raising foals can be hard. I mean, knowing when and how to discipline them. And when it's time to introduce things, and how to introduce them so that the foal isn't scared.
i kind of worked with mika sinced she was 3 i was and still doing somes introductions to normally things like presures and relases or tarp with water on because she not used to water on her or around her.
 

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i'am only asking to seeying and helping me because it is sinced i knowing mika and I could not get her in foal when she was not officially mine, that they would never accepting that never salling her to me when she was younger
 

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i kind of worked with mika sinced she was 3 i was and still doing somes introductions to normally things like presures and relases or tarp with water on because she not used to water on her or around her.
An already well trained, well behaved mature horse is extremely different to a young, unhandled foal. Both in their behaviour, as they've not learned how to respond/behave with humans, so you need to know how & gain some experience teaching everything, and physically - you must be extremely careful with any forceful methods, as they are very easily damaged, including tying them up, hoof handling etc.

They NEED lots of free exercise every single day - yes, people do lock up babies in boxes for their convenience, and this is not good for adult horses either, but esp for babies, you want to give them every chance to grow up & develop strong & sound, and locking them in a stable & restricting exercise will disallow that, to a large degree.

Restricting social interaction is also problematic & if they don't grow up with other horses, aside from their mother, they don't develop social skills & understanding and can find it hard/impossible to get along with horses in future. So on the last note, I'd want to ensure the foal could live in a herd. Pref with other young horses, but with at least 1-2 unrelated horses.
 

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Agree, but I believe her reason is to have it to 'remember' her mare when the mare's gone. So she's not planning on selling it. But the horse's age, that OP says for some reason she want at least 2 foals and other comments, about surrogate mothers etc, make me think she has not yet done any research into breeding. Perhaps OP this is the first place you've voiced these desires? And so you just don't yet understand what it all entails, both health-wise for the horses or money-wise, regarding either mare or foal. So OP, I'd suggest you do lots of research, ask all these questions of actual breeders and breeding-specialist vets. By all means, I wouldn't advise you just take our words for stuff.

I do also suggest you do consider how saleable or otherwise the foal would be, which will have to include bringing it up to be fit and healthy and ensuring it's well trained enough - which will probably include hiring a trainer, more $$ - because to be responsible about it, you need to seriously consider all the 'what ifs', such as you can no longer afford to keep the horses - if they're not worth anything to people, because of health, soundness or behaviour, then... the end is nigh for them.
Yeah even if you don't intend on selling your foal it's good to make sure that what ever your breeding doesn't end up in the meat price range and with how much it really costs to keep a foal for it's first few years, I'd leave the breeding for professionals. Her mare still has some years to go so why risk it. Live each day like there is no tomorrow, because one day, there isn't.
 
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