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Discussion Starter #1
Thinking of having a 14' gooseneck stock trailer built with a single axle!
Anyone pull a single axle? Pros? cons?
 

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i,ve seen them and used them,when we had nothing else to use,not a good idea,in fact i think they are illegal over here[for horses,cattle] they drag you back ,pushh you forward and very easily start swaying,and if you get a puncture big problems
 

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I wouldn't do anything over a 1horse with a single axle, mainly for stability reasons. Also, changing a tire would be horrible. With a double axle, you can use a trailer aid to roll up on ad get the tire up in the air. I have changed a tire in under 10minutes with one of these on numerous occasions (blow outs seem to like to happen on trailers in really hot weather). I've also changed a tire on a single axle trailer using a jack and it is next to impossible, especially if loaded and you do not want to unload a horse on the side of a road. Best of luck to you with the new trailer!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies!
The tire blow out it one of my greatest concerns...I may just go with a tandem axle!
Thanks again
 

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Everyone had good points. I wouldn't even think of towing a 14ft trailer with a single axle.. Stability would be the biggest concern of mine...:wink: I have dual axles on my 16ft stock trailer also have brakes on both axles. I added the extra brakes. I believe anything that will carry over 10k should have brakes on both axle's...Can never be to safe....:wink:
 

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. I believe anything that will carry over 10k should have brakes on both axle's...Can never be to safe....:wink:
When would you carry 10,000 pounds? 2 horses are lucky to weigh 2000 pounds or 2500 at the most??
That said I would never consider a single axle horse trailer, never ever saw one. If you have a blow out the corner would drop.
 

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I was basically talking about total weight. Not just horses...I'm pulling 10k with my LQ loaded...
 
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Thinking of having a 14' gooseneck stock trailer built with a single axle!
Anyone pull a single axle? Pros? cons?
My guess is that it would not be legal on the roads.

Further more why!......if you ever got a flat think what would happen to the horses inside.

Super Nova
 

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I've seen them and some people like them because they are quite manueverable and light. I don't see alot of cons if you aren't going to be hauling hundreds of miles at a time. If you get a flat it's going to be harder to change the tire and it MAY shake your horses a little more but I doubt it will be dangerous. As long as your under the maximum DOT allowable wieght for a single axle trailer you will be perfectly legal on the roads. I would probably get a double axle trailer though if I was goin to have it built.
 

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OzarkGrey....Great question, allow me to share my expieriences with you. First of all, for liability reasons trailer manufacturers will not produce a trailer that is unsafe and/or untested.

I have bought ,sold, traded and used many makes (Titan, Diamond D, Coose, Trailman, Travelong,WW, Travelute,CM, Stidham and Featherlite among others) of single axle stock trailers here in South Dakota with both torsion and slipper type suspensions.
The smallest being a 10' on a 6K axle with 235/85R16 10PR, and the largest being a 16' on a 8K torsion axle with Michelin XTA 215/75 R17.5 18PR BSW tires.
These trailers ALL pulled easier, turned with less bind under heavy loads on hard surfaces, and defineatly no problems when having a blow out. The trailer stayed true did not whip or sway under both loaded and empty conditions and the corner did not drop.
A problem with those cute lil ole 3500# or 5200# tandem set ups on 15" rubber is when making sharp turns under loaded conditions on any hard surface will result in one maybe two bent axles.
Also replacing 4 "avgerage" 15" tires that are common on most goosenecks of this size is more expensive than replacing 2 well made 16' 14PR tires.
Changing tires under loaded conditions, say a load of 500lb calves along the interstate can be problematic if you don't have the right equipment, mainly the jack,(either a handyman or a 20ton bottle jack). Other than that my expieriences with single axle livestock goosenecks have been very positive. And I would recommend one to anybody considering a purchase. You can get by with a 1/2 ton pick up pulling the 10' and 12" goosenecks. But on a 14'-16' gooseneck stock trailer i would recommend a minimum of a 3/4 ton pick up.

As of this writing I have in our shop a used 14' S&H gooseneck that we cut the lil cute 3500# axles off of and are replacing them with a single 7000# dexter torsion axle and michlin xp rib radials 235/85R16 tires on 8 hole modular wheels, along with new wiring, a rumber floor, and replacing the slat sides with solid sides which is easier to enclose in these tough SD winters, and new paint, this trailer has been sold before completion.
While some concerns were identified in some earlier posts, my expierience tells me that most of these concerns are with out merit.
i hope my 2 cents helps you make an informed decision!!
 

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When would you carry 10,000 pounds? 2 horses are lucky to weigh 2000 pounds or 2500 at the most??
That said I would never consider a single axle horse trailer, never ever saw one. If you have a blow out the corner would drop.
My trailer weights 6,800 empty.

I wouldn't buy a 1 axle trailer. I've had 2 trailers, one with 2 axles and one with 3, and I've driven them both around town with no problems. The first time I took each of them out of town, I got a flat.

The first time was with the smaller, 2 axle trailer. I was heading to a town about 30 minutes away when I heard a big BOOM and felt/heard my horse's feet moving. I pulled over, got out, looked at the tires on the driver's side and checked on my horse and couldn't find anything wrong, so I got back in and kept going. When I got there, I went around to the passenger's side and had one tire pretty much totally gone. I ended up spending half the night at the local walmart buying and returning jacks while trying to find one that would lift the trailer up high enough to put the spare on.

The second time was in the triple axle trailer, heading to a place about 250 miles from me. It was on a Saturday, I was heading to a wedding that I was already running late for because I didn't know that mapquest bases the estimated time on the speed limit, which was 80mph, and there was no way in hell I was going that fast with a 32' trailer behind me in the hill country. Anyway, there was no place to stop and get the tire changed and I didn't have a jack big enough to lift the trailer. I ended up driving over 300 miles with a flat, which meant that by the time I got that one fixed I had to replace 2 others as well, but it sure as hell beat leaving my horse and trailer on the side of the highway while I drove 150 miles the opposite way to get another tire or waiting for somebody to bring me one.

My next trailer is definitely going to be aluminum. :lol:
 

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I have changed many trailer tires on double axle trailers and I have NEVER used a jack. I have a piece of railroad tie that is about three feet long with one end cut so I can pull on or back on to it depending on which tire is blown. I just loosen the lugnuts then pull onto the block and replace the tire. Then I back off the block and finish tightening the lug nuts. The only disadvantage to a single axle trailer would be the need for a jack to change a tire.
 

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I carry a jack but have never had to use it. I carry the trailer aid and have used it a few times to change flats. Best thing ever for changing a tire on a dual axle trailer.:wink:
 

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Angus Black Bull Is right on the money. I have pulled a few made by Hannover and loved them I am going to build my own soon. If you are going to have one built the key is AXLE PLACEMENT! That is the mistake that most MFG's make. If you are using a 1/2ton or smaller truck the axle center-line needs to be dead on at the 2/3rd mark of the trailer to limit tounge weight. If you have a 3/4 ton or bigger as a tow vehicle you can start the shackles at the 2/3 mark or farther back. I have seen several single axle trailers down here as large as 5 horses(usually on 10K duals) with the axle at the rear of the trailer. The axle that you need depends on what the predominant road surface is that you will use it on. If the trailer is going to be off road allot go for a spring and shackle set up. If you drive on paved roads all the time then torsion axles are great. If you can afford it air ride is the best of both worlds. I currently have a WW with torsions. It pulls good on the highway but takes a beating in the pasture and on the gravel roads that I live on. So much so that I will be repairing the rear gate latches soon because they have nearly rubbed in half. I wouldn't have anything smaller than a 235/85R16 load range F on the ground on it. I haven't found any 15" tire that can handle the Texas heat yet. I blow them out all the time. If ya have any questions I got plenty of answers. My masters thesis work was done on trailers in relation to animal comfort and stress.
 

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The idea that you would never want a single axle on a horse trailer is absurd! This speaks highly of a problem with vechile maintence, not vechicle design. Do all of you have a truck to pull the trailer that has 2 axles in the steering position? Do you have two axles in the drive tires position? Why of necessity do you need two axles in the trailer position? You must of necessity have a jack to replace the front tire on the truck - why would it be horrible to need a jack for the rear of the truck.
 

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I haven't found any 15" tire that can handle the Texas heat yet. I blow them out all the time. .
This is not a statement made by a trailer design expert.
If you are blowing them out all the time, you need desparatly to find a different axle/tire combination. A lot of the cheap higher ply tires will give very poor service as they are so stiff that they shimmy a lot goin down the road and heat up way to much and then blow out. Sometimes a less stiff (good radial) even a lower ply rating tire will hold up better due to less heat being generated.
 

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mogen

I pulled a single axle to rodeos for several years. Stability was excellent due to low center of gravity. Used 10 ply tires. Had 1 blowout on interstate. No more problems than any other flat. Also a fuel saver because of less rolling resistance.
 
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