The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone --

I've been looking and talking to a horse owner about a gorgeous 18.2hh Hanoverian X Belgian horse for sale. Only negative thing, is that the horse is in Colorado. It's almost impossible for me to take off right now and take a plane there to look at him.

Has anyone else bought a horse without ever seeing it face to face and riding it? I've only seen pictures, and videos. The horse will obviously be thoroughly checked by a Vet and have their coggins done. Besides that, how risky is it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
Pretty risky. My mom did it for her mare, without having a vet look at her before hand. Turns out she has a slight stifle issue (which really isn't that bad, my mom rarely rides) and was infested with lice, which was then passed on to the other two, but we were so lucky that nothing else was wrong. I would pass on it, as nice as the horse sounds, you don't know if the owner is only telling you things you would want to hear, it could have some underlying issues, and once you buy it, it's your problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,155 Posts
I have tried many many horses, and I have ridden twice for ones that have prospect. I want to make sure I fit the horse.

Beware with such big horses with joint issues. I had an 18hh mare and at seven in very light work she already had light arthritis due to the pure size of her.

I also want to know the person I am selling a horse too, you can only find out so much over phone and email ;)

Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,433 Posts
It can work, work well or badly, because we live in the middle of nowhere as far as Haflingers are concerned I did it a lot:

1) Horse was as described, apart from the novice ride, she was quite reactive, if I had of seen her in the flesh I would of passed. It didn't help that she didn't have one pace that I liked. Great brood mare, but not good under saddle.

2) Disaster, MUST HAVE vetting done, this mare was cheap enough that I chose not to vet, cost me a lot, the mare was never good for anything.

Anyway I would maybe do it for a broodie, not a saddle horse
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,655 Posts
I have but only with someone I know vouching for the horse and whether it will be what I need or from a buyer I have previously bought from and trust. Either way I have the horse vet checked first or have agreement that it can go back if I get it and it isn't as agreed or fails the vet check. I usually write a post dated check and call the bank to let them know so it doesn't get processed before the date written so I can cancel it if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,717 Posts
I would never buy a riding horse sight unseen. I want to ride the horse myself to make sure we match, and make sure what the owner said was true. But to each his own. Just know that if you buy the horse sight unseen and something isn't right, it is your own fault. Buyer beware.

Now if the horse is not broke the ride and is just a prospect, I have bought sight unseen before. There's not quite as much to it, if you can't ride the horse. But again, "buyer beware" still applies.

So as long as you are okay accepting a issues that might arise because you didn't look at the horse first, go for it. But if you can't handle it financially or emotionally, then you'd better go look at the horse before you buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
The only two horses that worked for me was the two I bought through telephone conversations and internet pics. The others I had on trials and had tested never did... Go figure .... but I think I just lucked out. I was once looking online at a horse and found someone online that was experienced and they went and tested the horse for me. They were great and with their feedback I did not buy. Check for barns in and around that area and see if someone would go out and check it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,642 Posts
I honestly wouldn't buy a riding horse sight-unseen. Too much can be wrong, from hating the horse's movement to something wrong that you can't see in video. Even with a vet that is impartial, you really want to be there to ask questions.
The exceptions, for me, are:
- young stock. Non riding aged horses from reputable breeders.
- a horse from a trusted friend or trusted party, or one you can have a trusted party see in person.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Agreed..if oing to be used for riding you need to make sure you like how the horse goes. For example, I am on the hunt for a fourth level+ dressage prospect. I found a gorgeous mare, 9 y/o, 16.3, showing third, schooling fourth with alleged (no verifiable scores) scores in the 70s and a great price. I spoke with the owner at length for over a week and this mare sounded perfect..calm, sane, not extreme mare issues and great movement. I made the decision to go to Tennessee to see the mare..total bust. She was attitude incarnate and we had no connection at all. The mare has gorgeous movement, no lie there, but, she needs someone with as much mare attitude as she has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,670 Posts
My friend did, it worked out. I wouldn't call her perfect. When she got up here from N Carolina she was 300 lbs under.weight, hardly neck reined, and wouldn't hold her gait (twh). She was opposite of what she looked/seemed like in the video and photos. In the end she has worked out despite all her short comings, especially when we thought we were getting a broke to death push button goes anywhere trail horse.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
I got my mare that way sort of.. I did pick her up, and I had a two week trial period. But I paid for her in full before ever seeing her in person and drove two and a half states away to get her.
She is the best horse I've ever had and made my decision with photos/videos of her only.
Of course things could go wrong, in my case it worked out pretty well.
Maybe see about getting a one-two week trial period to make sure the horse it what you want? Have a contract stating that you get the full payment back or whatever should the horse not work out for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
I would pass.
As one member said, the sheer size of an 18.2hh horse means more health issues, particularity in the legs.
I did this once. The pony sounded perfect. The owner sent us over 20 videos of her competing, being hacked out at home, being tacked up, schooling. She looked and sounded perfect.
The thing we didn't consider was that she could have been sedated in every video. We thought she was just laid back.
When we got her home, the sedation was starting to wear off. We got her out of the horse box, and then we knew something was desperately wrong. She was literally stone mad. No amount of work could help her. Every single person who got up on her was thrown off and nearly killed. I never even rode her.
In the end she was put down. She was just too dangerous.

If this happened with an 18.2hh horse, you wouldn't be able to control it. A horse of that huge size could be extremely dangerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
That was one thing I never considered with any horse I ever bought was having a drug panel pulled. I always got lucky I guess in that the horses stayed sane. No longer though..there are just too many people out there that will drug/sedate to get a horse sold. Any PPE, even one with a two week trial, I have a drug panel pulled and do not notify the owner ahead of time that I plan on having it done. That way if they sedate or use a lot of painkillers, the drug panel will pull it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,642 Posts
That was one thing I never considered with any horse I ever bought was having a drug panel pulled. I always got lucky I guess in that the horses stayed sane. No longer though..there are just too many people out there that will drug/sedate to get a horse sold. Any PPE, even one with a two week trial, I have a drug panel pulled and do not notify the owner ahead of time that I plan on having it done. That way if they sedate or use a lot of painkillers, the drug panel will pull it up.
I bought a horse that to this day I swear was drugged. The seller had blown his mind, and knew what she was doing. Well known rider, breeder, and seller too. On our Olympic team, in fact. At the very least, his mind was blown, and at the most, he may have been drugged.
Even with that experience, I've not pulled a panel on a potential purchase. However, I do make sure to mention it to the sellers - I tell them that I may ask for a blood panel with the vet check, and gauge the response. Keeping in mind the PPE would be set up right away. I have never felt that gut feeling that I should pull a panel, and have trusted the sellers I've bought from. Every one of them did not object to bloodwork in the least, and encouraged me to do what I needed to do to feel comfortable with the purchase.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Is there anyway she can give him to you for a trial?

If you're willing to put down a deposit and have him transported it may be worth it to check him out and have a vet look over him.

In the meantime, got any pictures? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
To respond to some of your comments -- Thank you so far. I appreciate the feedback.

It wouldn't be possible to transport him here for a short trial period. It takes 28 hours for a straight drive through, or a 2-3 day transport with the horse. It also costs roughly $1,300 to haul it here. I'm in NJ, and the horse is in CO.

The seller has very good recommendations from previous purchases -- but I suppose anyone can give me a number to a relative or something posing as a former client.

I've purchased a horse before who must have been badly drugged when I rode her (I didn't know it at the time), and then showed up looking like a completely different animal. Even through it all, I nursed her back to health, and retrained her from the ground up. A year of hand walking, and grazing before I even went on her back. I'm aware of the possible consequences and conditions I could face. Surprisingly, I'm willing to go through it all. Something in me just feels like it could be a good fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
He is absolutely gorgeous!

If you're considering all the things that could go wrong and your gut is still saying buy him, then I say go for it.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top