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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to get Donkey a cart, but I'm not exactly sure which cart would be the best fit for him. I was hoping someone might be able to help with that. I read somewhere that to find out what height wheel I need is to measure from the ground to about where the shaft should go on his shoulder (right about point of shoulder.) I went out to measure him and got about 26 inches. I'm going to measure again tomorrow since I'm not 100% I measured in the right area. Is this true?

That brings me to my next question. I have only had experience with straight shafts, but looking at the website where I would like to buy the cart, they have curved shafts as well. According to the description it says that the height of the shaft can be adjusted from 18" - 29". Is that really how those would work? Which kind of shafts would be best for this?

Just for a little background. Donkey is almost 4 years old and 33" tall. We will be driving on mostly flat ground with maybe a few soft spots on the back roads. This will be mostly for fun with maybe a very small show once or twice. This is the cart in question. They also have 21" and 27" wheels. EZ Entry Horse Cart-Mini Size Metal Floor w/53" Curved Shafts w/24" Solid Rubber Tires

Thank you in advance!
 

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I bought that same EE cart (Easy Entry) for my first mini cart (except with the wood floor instead of metal). It's worked great for me as a starter cart. I'd go with the straight shafts.

I'm not sure of the exact size of my tires but I can measure them. My mini is a few inches taller then your donkey but I could prob go up an inch or two on tire size. I had to drop the shaft loops on my harness a bit to level out my cart.

What harness are you planning on getting?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I bought that same EE cart (Easy Entry) for my first mini cart (except with the wood floor instead of metal). It's worked great for me as a starter cart. I'd go with the straight shafts.

I'm not sure of the exact size of my tires but I can measure them. My mini is a few inches taller then your donkey but I could prob go up an inch or two on tire size. I had to drop the shaft loops on my harness a bit to level out my cart.

What harness are you planning on getting?
Thank you for replying. Just wondering, why would you go with the straight shaft over the curved shaft?

I also already have his harness. He has this one: https://www.ronshorseharness.com/product/miniature-horse-harness-single/
 

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I prefer the straight shafts over the curved unless you are driving a marathon type vehicle where you run the risk of running the end of the shaft into/though and obstacle. The point of your straight shaft should end at your equine's shoulder. I believe (someone correct me if I'm wrong) the curved shafts like that end at the saddle. The top most curve of the shaft sits in the shaft loop. In my opinion this is not needed unless you are really "jack knifing" your animals around a really sharp turn.

As for the adjustment... I looks like that is all done at the base of the shafts. There is a plate with 4 holes and a pin. It looks like the shafts pivot up or down on the front of the cart then a stabilizer arm is moved forward or back in the holes in the plate to keep the shafts raised to the height you choose. This gives you adjustment height-wise in the shafts vs. changing to smaller or larger wheels. The reason this works with curved shafts but not straight is the curve will hold the shaft loop at many different angles whereas straight shafts need to be fairly level in the shaft loops. It's an interesting concept for sure. If you get the curved I'd be curious to know how it works out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I prefer the straight shafts over the curved unless you are driving a marathon type vehicle where you run the risk of running the end of the shaft into/though and obstacle. The point of your straight shaft should end at your equine's shoulder. I believe (someone correct me if I'm wrong) the curved shafts like that end at the saddle. The top most curve of the shaft sits in the shaft loop. In my opinion this is not needed unless you are really "jack knifing" your animals around a really sharp turn.

As for the adjustment... I looks like that is all done at the base of the shafts. There is a plate with 4 holes and a pin. It looks like the shafts pivot up or down on the front of the cart then a stabilizer arm is moved forward or back in the holes in the plate to keep the shafts raised to the height you choose. This gives you adjustment height-wise in the shafts vs. changing to smaller or larger wheels. The reason this works with curved shafts but not straight is the curve will hold the shaft loop at many different angles whereas straight shafts need to be fairly level in the shaft loops. It's an interesting concept for sure. If you get the curved I'd be curious to know how it works out for you.
I have been looking up pictures on google images of driving horses just to try to get some ideas. It looks like the marathon style carts and shafts have the completely closed shafts that end at the girth. Like you said earlier this is to keep them from getting caught or hung up on stuff. It looks like the curved shafts still come to about the point of shoulder.

I think I might just go for the curved shafts just to see what they are like. I am also liking the look of them over the straight shafts as well. The cart place also has shafts that you can buy so I'm thinking I can try the curved shafts and if they don't work then I can order a set of straight shafts. The body of the cart is the same either way so it's an easy swap and it's not that expensive to get the replacement shafts. I will be able to learn something from this at least! Like you said the concept of the curved shafts is interesting.
 
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