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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I rode my racking horse today, and I'm really having an issue with sliding forward in my saddle anytime he stops, or I stop him. I'll slide forward, and my legs will swing way back, and then I end up literally standing in my stirrups. I've never had an issue with this on any other horse, or with my saddle. I'm thinking it may be the way his back is shaped? I'm not an expert on conformation, so I need some help. Is there maybe a certain pad I could buy to help? Thanks. 馃檪
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Hi! (Based on my experience with my horses) maybe it could be that your horse stops differently then the others? I bet if you work on stopping with him it will get better? (I used to slide forward when stopping bareback on one of my horses) Goodluck!!
 

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could you post a photo of him on level ground, with the saddle tacked up as you usuallly do? and, if you have a friend to video you gaiting along and then stopping (try to be like normal) and we can see , perhaps, what is going on. uploading to Youtube makes it easy to post here
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Could it be that hes stopping on his front end as in not sitting down on his hind-end when stopping?
Well, it's not only when I stop, it's anytime I pull on the reins to stop. I feel like the saddle is tipped forward when I ride. I've never had this issue with any of the horses I've ridden, and I always use this saddle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
could you post a photo of him on level ground, with the saddle tacked up as you usuallly do? and, if you have a friend to video you gaiting along and then stopping (try to be like normal) and we can see , perhaps, what is going on. uploading to Youtube makes it easy to post here
The next time I tack him up, (should be Friday or so) I'll post a pic of the saddle on him.
I'm not sure if I'll be able to get the video. 馃檪
 

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Well, it's not only when I stop, it's anytime I pull on the reins to stop. I feel like the saddle is tipped forward when I ride. I've never had this issue with any of the horses I've ridden, and I always use this saddle.
Aww OK, I see what you are saying now, I was thinking that you were sliding in the saddle when asking for a stop, but your saddle slides forward/tipping and your legs are getting behind you. That tells me your saddle is not fitting this horse and it may be just to wide for this horse. What type of saddle are you riding in, is a english or western saddle? If western saddle I can help a little bit on that but a english I dont have a clue how to help, lol.. But anyways the conformation on your horse looks fine to me, just a tiny hip high, but he could be standing on uneven ground. But most of the time when any saddle slides forward/tips you have a saddle fitting issue. Yept I say the saddle is to wide with the tipping.
 

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Didn't say if you are riding English or Western. If western reins for stopping should be used very lightly. the main que for stopping should be seat delivered. Set deep against the cantle and squeeze with your thighs against the swells and push slightly forward with your legs in your stirrups. This should keep you back in your saddle and not sliding forward. Most people try to use too much rein and not enough pre que with their seat. more you stay out of a horses mouth the lighter he will be and happier.
 

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So although the pictures are just pictures, not conformational stood for...
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Your horse appears very butt high in those pictures shared.
That puts your saddle pommel low...
Depending upon the actual fit of the saddle and saddle design you could be sliding forward because the saddle is pitched downhill.
Indeed pictures of the horse tacked up might offer some clues to this...
The horse could also be throwing his weight on his forehand and that will dump the shoulders lower....and slip-slide you can go.
Pictures of the animal tacked up to see what might be happening and answer part of the issue....
馃惔... jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Aww OK, I see what you are saying now, I was thinking that you were sliding in the saddle when asking for a stop, but your saddle slides forward/tipping and your legs are getting behind you. That tells me your saddle is not fitting this horse and it may be just to wide for this horse. What type of saddle are you riding in, is a english or western saddle? If western saddle I can help a little bit on that but a english I dont have a clue how to help, lol.. But anyways the conformation on your horse looks fine to me, just a tiny hip high, but he could be standing on uneven ground. But most of the time when any saddle slides forward/tips you have a saddle fitting issue. Yept I say the saddle is to wide with the tipping.
I ride western. I've ridden him in three different saddles, and they all make me do this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So although the pictures are just pictures, not conformational stood for...
View attachment 1123232
Your horse appears very butt high in those pictures shared.
That puts your saddle pommel low...
Depending upon the actual fit of the saddle and saddle design you could be sliding forward because the saddle is pitched downhill.
Indeed pictures of the horse tacked up might offer some clues to this...
The horse could also be throwing his weight on his forehand and that will dump the shoulders lower....and slip-slide you can go.
Pictures of the animal tacked up to see what might be happening and answer part of the issue....
馃惔... jmo...
Thank you.
I'll make sure I get some pictures of him tacked up on Friday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Didn't say if you are riding English or Western. If western reins for stopping should be used very lightly. the main que for stopping should be seat delivered. Set deep against the cantle and squeeze with your thighs against the swells and push slightly forward with your legs in your stirrups. This should keep you back in your saddle and not sliding forward. Most people try to use too much rein and not enough pre que with their seat. more you stay out of a horses mouth the lighter he will be and happier.
Western. He has a very hard mouth, and it's difficult to stop him. We're currently working on that at the moment, but this issue is making it very hard to train him. I just switched his western curb (that his old owners direct reined him on) and went to an O ring snaffle.
 

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@lovetolope , Work him in the pen and take him directly to the fence ( at a 90*). Just as you get to it use your seat cues first then lightly with your reins. He has no choice , either stop or hit the fence. Do this several repetitions then do something else for a little bit and then come back to it. Both walk and trot into the fence. After a few riding sessions you'll be surprised how much easier he'll get to soften at the stop. Always be sure to pre cue him with your seat, then he'll always think " oh, we're going to stop " before you use the reins. You can also reinforce it with the verbal cue "whoa".
 

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Hi
while you fit the saddle ,is there any issue with your horse shaking the ears or the tail ,then you have an issue with your saddle and need a pad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi
while you fit the saddle ,is there any issue with your horse shaking the ears or the tail ,then you have an issue with your saddle and need a pad.
Nope, he's practically asleep or very relaxed when I tack and cinch him up. Never shows any signs of discomfort or anything while riding or getting saddled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
@lovetolope , Work him in the pen and take him directly to the fence ( at a 90*). Just as you get to it use your seat cues first then lightly with your reins. He has no choice , either stop or hit the fence. Do this several repetitions then do something else for a little bit and then come back to it. Both walk and trot into the fence. After a few riding sessions you'll be surprised how much easier he'll get to soften at the stop. Always be sure to pre cue him with your seat, then he'll always think " oh, we're going to stop " before you use the reins. You can also reinforce it with the verbal cue "whoa".
Thank you! I'll definitely work on that. Never thought to approach it that way.
 
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