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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as some of you may already know, I recently took over ownership of Elle, the 23 year old horse I've been riding/part boarding for the last five years. And she comes with lots of little standard health complaints that are par for the course with horses. Central sulcus thrush, a bit of white line separation at her toes, and some mud fever on her back heels and pasterns.

Well, her current part-boarder and I have been tackling those things, and we're winning!!! I'm just so happy that I had to post about it somewhere, LOL.

Her thrush had mostly cleared up by summer, but we've been diligently spraying in a 50/50 mix of organic apple cider vinegar (the kind with the mother included) and water to treat any remaining nasties and keep it from coming back, and while she never seems to fully fill in those central sulci, they are getting a lot better and this week the farrier said he was impressed with how they're looking. fist pump

I also had her shoes pulled during his visit. He's skeptical of how well she'll do without them, but it gets icy where I board her so I'd rather she went barefoot, at least over the winter, if possible. And the footing in the indoor arena is a lot finer, and less prone to wearing her down, than the footing in the outdoor. Today was my first ride on her without the shoes and she went really well and seemed perfectly content. So we'll see how the next six weeks go. But she was barefoot for YEARS before we moved her there, so I feel like we should be able to get her there again, at least for the indoor riding season.

We've been treating mud fever on her back pasterns for a few weeks now, too, and it's clearing up too!! Yay! Been scrubbing them with a clean terry cloth towel every time, and chlorhexadine soap. Then letting them dry before putting on a protective layer of extra strength Desitin. And when I felt them today they seemed crustier than I expected... but it was just arena sand sticking to the Desitin, and she was all cleared up underneath! another fist pump

Regarding her hoof quality and the white line separation, I've been reading and reading on proper nutrition for the hoof. So I had the barn manager stop their default vitamin/mineral blend (which was kind of low on a lot of things) and I got her started on Amino Trace+ by Mad Barn, which is supposed to be the most hoof-friendly vitamin and mineral balancer available here in Canada. And I gave her a plain salt lick in her stall, as free access to PLAIN salt is supposed to be critical for good hoof quality as well. I may also add a balanced Omega oil blend to her diet in the new year, but we'll see how she does. Lots of people are resigned to the quality (or lackthereof) of their horse's feet, but I've seen some pretty staggering transformations just from nutritional changes. So I'm hoping to get tighter growth, more heel, and a less thrush-prone frog happening.

It's empowering to be able to do my research and make these changes, now that I own her! Just wanted to share, well, some little victories. :)
 

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How fantastic! I hope you keep making progress with her:)

It is great you have been able to change her diet and you see a marked difference. Maybe the barn owner will take note and feed the other horses better:)
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How fantastic! I hope you keep making progress with her:)

It is great you have been able to change her diet and you see a marked difference. Maybe the barn owner will take note and feed the other horses better:)
Thanks so much! I will say, she actually does feed them well, and they all look pretty fantastic, but none of the other horses are in regular work, there. Most of the horses are either golden oldies (although technically so is mine, just mine isn't retired, haha), or else they get ridden maaaaaybe once a month by their semi-absent owners. They're all in good weight and the BO does genuinely care. However, we're in an area with high iron in the water and soil, so I wanted to give the Amino Trace+ a go as it has low iron and higher levels of zinc, copper, etc., to help balance that out. The BO was asking me about it today, actually, but I think it's a bit pricey for her to feed in bulk to all the pasture puffs. 😁
 

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Nothing that truly helps is cheap, lollol

She May want to give strong consideration to the a Amino Trace, even if it means raising board a few pennies.

High iron equals low copper and zinc.

Low copper and zinc not only translates to lower hoof and coat health, it can also increase the chances of a horse developing metabolic issues- especially if the horse happens to be genetically predispositioned to metabolic issues.
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For sure. We'll see! I'm paying out of pocket for the Amino Trace+, in addition to her included feeding program, as I want to ensure Elle is getting the best! I priced out the Omneity from the same company -- which is still a really good vitamin/mineral product, and their most popular -- so maybe she'll consider switching them over to that. Would still be better than the current stuff, I think, without costing quite as much as the Amino Trace+.
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good for you! I bet the central sulcus groove will open up more without shoes.
Yeah, we had the shoes on because of excessive wear from the gravelly outdoor footing -- but while it's been good to give her a chance to regrow more hoof, I haven't liked how pinched her frogs have started to look. Hopefully there's a balance to be found!!
 
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