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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a yearling filly arrive Sept 20. She came completely unhandled, but we've been making pretty good progress since.

So, on Wednesday(29th), we had the farrier by for a much needed trim. She was lightly sedated and did fine, no issues. Thursday, all normal. Friday we took a walk around the outskirts of a large unused paddock. She was a little winded by the end of it- didn't think too much of it as the ground is rough with some hills and she's likely been kept in smaller pens for several months. Saturday she had excess clear mucus in the morning, by the evening she had yellow, slug-like mucus from the right nostril only. Cleaned it up, by night check she had more mucus from the right but it was clear. This morning again, right nostril only. Breathing not labored, but a 'wet' noise on the exhale. When I checked back after feeding she had a bunch of walnut sized white/yellow mucus chunks in the hay, but no more noise. No smell at all, no change in attitude or apatite. Haven't managed to get a temperature reading but we're working on it.

She's still in quarantine, so this kind of stuff is kind of expected? We have vet visit booked at the end of the month, which was the earliest appt available. The "emergency" call out fee is not insignificant, so if anyone with more experience with snotty horses can chime in I'd love to hear it.
 

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Call the vet, you need them now...
If you can, get a temperature and vitals on her for when you call.
Your onset of symptoms are perfect for shipping fever or strangles, it could be something else too but this is respiratory connected.
The "snots"....
What ever she has is highly contagious and you, the human are the carrier of it animal to animal..so stay out of your barn and away from your dogs till you wash and change clothes before you interact with other animals.

Quarantine is wonderful, but the issue is she needs antibiotics of the right kind or you are prolonging and in fact allowing her to become resistant to crucial medications to treat illnesses she may encounter in her future years.
She needs antibiotics, drugs...she needs them now....
馃惔...
 

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I agree with get the vet, find out what you're dealing with. BUT! If it's strangles DO NOT use antibiotics!! It will run its course naturally, and be fine.
All the antibiotics will do is drive it down into the gut, which can easily be fatal. It's called a name that I'm sure I cannot post here.

My neighbor brought in strangles on some canners he held there overnight. It went thru all his, then they took it up, and promptly gave it to all of mine.
No deaths except for the mare and foal he started on antibiotics.

It's going to be a mess for a while if it is strangles, but its just a matter of time.
 

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Good to know.... (y)
Vets I've worked with in the past treating strangles think did drugs...:unsure: trying to remember.
I haven't dealt with strangles in more than 30 years.

Guess sometimes letting it take its course is better...the otherwise healthy body fight the ick..
But you have to know what this is first...
Since the lungs are involved since respiratory in nature...I sure would want to be seen now and make sure the lungs are not "involved" or scarring to protect future health of the mature horse.
馃惔...
 

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@horselovinguy when it went thru my herd, we had a real mess. Thankfully, it did not get up into my barn stock. But every horse outside got it. They'd come in for water, and it would look like someone dumped gallons of cottage cheese, white and yellow, in my main tank.
I did call my horse vet, I respect him immensely. He said if you are going to use antibiotics, you have to be DEDICATED to it. Or all it will do is drive it down into the gut, and a very good change it will kill the horse.
Or, I could just do nothing and let it run it's course. Which is what I did.
I didn't have to worry about quarantine tho, the neighbor's and my horses were the only ones in the valley. So his were a few days earlier than mine in getting over it.
Like I said, all was well except for that mare and foal that he did try to give the shots to. He lost them both. His wife was having a fit, "You can't just set back and do nothing!". She promised she would take care of the shots. She either missed one, or it didn't have any effect, both died.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well we're not friends anymore, but I did get a temperature reading: a whopping 104.3. It's a new thermometer and I feel like that's way to high for how chipper she is; but I'll absolutely be getting the vet out first thing tomorrow.

Here's a pic of the little troublemaker and her current discharge situation:
Hair Eye Horse Liver Working animal
 

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Well we're not friends anymore, but I did get a temperature reading: a whopping 104.3. It's a new thermometer and I feel like that's way to high for how chipper she is; but I'll absolutely be getting the vet out first thing tomorrow.

Here's a pic of the little troublemaker and her current discharge situation:
View attachment 1118746
Looks suspicious. If it is strangles, it will get a LOT worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Vet update~ My thermometer is correct, unfortunately. 104+ as of this morning. Started her on banamine and excede because the fever is so high. Plus she's now a little off her hay and is still slightly underweight. She's alert though, a little under the weather but still not nearly as bad as I would have expected with her temp/mucus situation.

Decided to call the stockyard she came from to see if there's anything going on there before I shell out the $150 for a strangles test. Treatment seems like it'll be the same regardless, but at the same time it'd be nice to know what to expect.

Edit- Going to get the test done for peace of mind
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update for those who might find this thread later: Not strangles, confirmed by blood test. Her temp got to 105.3 even with dosing banamine though, so whatever it was ended up being pretty nasty even if it wasn't as contagious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Upper respiratory infection, almost certainly bacterial with how quickly it cleared up after antibiotics. The assistant mentioned Strep zoo, but I guess nothing is certain without an actual test.
 
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