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Could someone please help me pick out a breed? I am new to horses and their different styles
 

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We'll need more info to help you pick, but I wouldn't base buying a horse on breed alone unless you know exactly what you're looking for, want it registered, etc.

Do you know what style of riding you want to get into? (english, western? - trail riding, jumping, western pleasure, hunter under saddle, equitation, gaming, reining, saddleseat, etc)
 

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I think you should pick a Fresian- they are heaven to watch :)
 

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what discipline do you want to get into? do you like high-strung horses and calm horses? how big would you like the horse to be? registered? do you want a gaited horse? congrats on getting into horses,though, you won't regret it! :)
 

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Are you nervous? Confident? Have you ridden a horse before? What's your experience level? All of those questions apply. If your a confident rider and know how to ride, despite owning a horse then you could do well with the hotter breeds, or younger horses if that's to your choosing. If your just starting out and completely new to horse ownership then your best bet would be to go with an older horse with lots of experience and gentle demeanor. There are so many good breeds out there to choose from. A couple of my faves are the Rocky Mountain and Tennessee Walking Horse, both are known for their gentle demeanor and are a great choice for beginner riders. Ofcourse, every breed has exceptions. Drafts are also good choices too. :)
 

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unbiastly, well kinda biast...for an average horse owner, someone who wants to feed, groom, and ride on occasion. I would consider the Rocky Mountain Horse. They are extreamly hardy, easy keepers, with a calm easy disposition. They are also gaited, so you have a smooth ride. Easy enough to step out and win blue ribbons, go on miles of trails, and then tote around kids bareback, all in the same weekend. I like a majority of all horse breeds, but I'll never own anything but a Rocky for the rest of my days. And they are of so easy on they eyes!

Nate
 

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I'm actually a very timid rider. I lost alot of confidence with my last horse, who wasn't the beginner horse he was said to be. He was too forward and turned out to be quite spooky, wont bore you with details but it didn't end well, so I'm looking for a confidence builder horse myself. I'm going to go look at a mountain horse next week. One of Nate's. :)
 

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Don't pick a breed. Pick a horse. Especially if you're new to horses, look for one that is quiet and willing. And don't pick it by yourself. Have an experienced person--who knows your skill level--go with you and give you advice, and then listen to them!

There may be breeds you just don't care for, and that's all right. I myself would never consider a draft, and appaloosas are way down on my list, but that's only my own preference. My dream horse was a chestnut Arabian gelding, so what did I get? A plain gray quarterhorse, and I couldn't be happier.
 

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Don't pick a breed. Pick a horse. Especially if you're new to horses, look for one that is quiet and willing. And don't pick it by yourself. Have an experienced person--who knows your skill level--go with you and give you advice, and then listen to them!


true..true...i have seen arabs that are calmer than quarters even though everyone always says quarters are wayyyy calmer. every horse is different.
 

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You should pic an arabian! they are majestic loyal and beautiful! wonderful horses for kids too!


arabs in general are high strung and wouldn't be usually suitable for a "timid" rider. They are extrememly sensitive to their rider. They are very loyal and beautiful though:p but all horses are different...not all arabs are beautiful,loyal,and a lot aren't suitable for kids horses....
 

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Please do not pick an Arabian. They are wonderful horses - I love mine to bits - but they need an experienced owner.

Now if you got an older one 20+ years you might be fine. A healthy well cared for Arab can live into its 40's. And most are used well into their 30's.

If you want to pick a breed then I would suggest a Quarter Horse. A been there done that older QH will take care of you. Look for one 15+ years of age. A sweet gelding or very sweet mare.
 

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My first and second horses were Arabians and took very good care of me. My first one was lazy and gentle, the second one was more high strung, but I was ready for him at that point. :)

But it is really silly to just start blurting out breeds when we have no idea what the original poster wants it for. Trail? English? Western? Something else?

There are good and bad horses of every breed, therefore, like Rule of Reason said, you should pick a horse, not a breed. And then if you own horses for a while and want to stick with a certain breed or have particular plans, such as to show, you can try to pick individuals from that breed. But especially for a beginner, the rule of "pick a horse, not a breed" really applies.

But if you tell us your experience level and what you would like to do with the horse, we can tell you breeds we think would be good for that. :D

Citrus, I love Friesians too, but I be a lot of us can't afford them. But sure, if money was no object, pick a Friesian, why not? :lol:

PS. My first horse, an Arabian gelding, was 11 when I got him. He made a wonderful first horse! But I am willing to admit he was special and perhaps a-typical. Arabians are just very, very sensitive. But they generally are smart and people-oriented. Just sensitive and have a higher energy level.
 

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My first and second horses were Arabians and took very good care of me. My first one was lazy and gentle, the second one was more high strung, but I was ready for him at that point.

But it is really silly to just start blurting out breeds when we have no idea what the original poster wants it for. Trail? English? Western? Something else?



we have asked...and the OP hasn't said anything except that she/he is a timid rider.... :wink:
 

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For a timid rider, you need a been there done that horse. An older horse that has been exposed to pretty much everything. I do agree with the pick a horse not a breed. If you're partial to a certain breed already, go ahead and look in that direction. But keep an open mind. I myself am partial to Tennessee Walkers. The one that I got in Nov. is a 16 yo been there done that horse. She is a real confidence booster. If you find one that you really want, ask the person if you can take it to try it out for a couple of weeks to a month. This way, you'll be able to guage the horse to wether it will definitely be the horse for you and your riding style. This way, if it is not a fit, you can take it back and continue looking.

Good luck in your search. And when you go to Nate's to look at the Rocky Mountain horses, stay relaxed and have fun with it. He seems knowledgeable about the breed, and hopefully will have a horse that will meet what you're looking for.
 

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I agree with the other posters that we need to know what you want to do in order to make good suggestions..but even then, a lot of times especially if you are a beginner I would just look at any horse that suits you.
But with all of that said........get a Rocky ;P
hahaha
Really, though, what are you looking into doing?
 

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i agree with whoever said not to choose a breed, choose a horse. this is sooooo true. for example, thoroughbreds are known to be generally a little hot however i have a tb mare here who is the quietest, sweetest horse. i can put anything from a first time rider on her to an intermediate dressage person. but then quarter horses who are generally known to be a more laid back breed can produce toey horses that arent suitable for beginners.

look for horses that say they are suitable fors beginners and look at those regardless of breed. sometimes our ideal horse doesnt turn out to be what we necessarily want anyways. just focus on the horse and its attributes :)
 
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