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Can anybody tell me what’s wrong with my Horse’s hoof/leg here?
He’s only 5 years old, I bought him a couple days ago and i tried to ride him around but he wont budge, tried Leading too (won’t work). I hope he didn’t turn Lame on me. He lets me sit on him but he won’t move. Could this be because of his hoof/leg condition?
Anybody please help.
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1. Was that leg like that when you brought the horse home? Does he always keep that leg turned out?

2. Regardless, that needs a vet’s attention right away, especially since you don’t know how the horse got like that.

3. Why did you put standing wraps on him? Get those off and leave them off until a vet sees him. It may help to cold hose him.

4. Do NOT ride him or lead him around until a vet sees him. The. ask the vet when it will be ok to ride him.

5. His hooves are in desperate need of a trim. He also needs a good farrier sooner than later.

5.1. Ask the vet to recommend a farrier if you don’t know anyone that’s any good.
 

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Did you ride the horse before purchase or did you purchase sight unseen from some photographs??

First, remove the polo bandages as they appear tight and that will destroy blood flow to the lower extremities...and can pool the blood and cause pain and swelling as seen.
Swelling as seen needs a vets attention ASAP if not sooner regardless of why/how it occurred!
Could it be from wraps put on wrong, to tight, to loose, pressure applied at the wrong spot....yes, to all of them or none of them.
Your horse has a enormously twisted leg...I'm guessing from the knee down but without full body pictures a unknown.
If that leg was not turned out when the horse was bought and you rode...well....buyer beware depending upon how your receipt is written.
The hooves appear long but not in neglected state so....
Call your vet and get them out now!!

Do not ride, do not walk, do not lunge....leave the horse alone!!!

By itself in a safe location no other horse can touch or anything attack it as it can not defend itself and is very vulnerable now.
Make sure there is shelter, water and food where it not have to walk to get any of them more than a step or two...
If the horse is used to being with company put another horse nearby, but not in the same secured area as your horse...
Your horse is near defenseless right now to anything.
You need to be proactive in the care and protection of the horse while waiting for medical help to arrive...and then based on diagnosis you take the next steps as needed...
Best of luck and please let us know how the horse is...we care.

A not so good way to start posting on the forum but...
WELCOME to the Forum!!
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Your poor horse isn’t moving because he has a seriously twisted ankle, perhaps even the entire leg is affected, can’t tell because of the wraps. He could have been born that way but even a relative ignoramus like me can tell something is seriously wrong with that ankle.
He should be wearing an ice wrap on that leg until the vet comes, imho. I do hope he’s okay.
 

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I agree take the wraps off and call a vet. Sorry to hear that you're going through this but definitely don't wait, whats worse than an untreated injury is one that was treated too late.
 

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Your horse needs veterinarian care. Please take off the leg wraps. So sorry this is happening to your horse.
 

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Please let us know what the vet says.

Also you need to have his neglected hooves attended by a farrier before you consider riding him. You need to book a good farrier on average every 4-6 weeks for hoof trimming, but as neglected, distorted hooves like that generally can't be just fixed in one go, best to book the farrier to come gradually improve them, 2-3 weekly, for a few trims at least.
 

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the angle of the fetlock makes it appear as if there may be a torn ligament, one that normally keeps the pastern angle more upright. I agree, vet call is necessary. Might entail an x ray and/or ultrasound.
 
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