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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately the horse I ride has started rearing. We believe the farrier unbalanced her and we now have a different one. She rears while doing groundwork but I believe that is a behavioral issue.

She is sore right where the cinch goes and forward a bit. In the last 2-3 months I have rode her less than 5 times and I haven't rode her for about 2-3 weeks. Her back is not sore when I touch it which is a first in a while, when we had that other farrier her back was always sore just touching it.

I rode her bareback and noticed that if I squeezed with both legs like to ask for a trot she would rear, if I asked for a turn on the hindquarters she had no issue. Once I get her trotting she is fine, but it is the transitions that bug her.

**This is a neighbors horse, not my own. I am looking for advice. Yes I do know I should probably have a vet look at it but like I said. It isn't my horse**

Any ideas?
 

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step 1 - i would talk with the horse's owner about these issues and suggest a vet should come do an evaluation to rule out physical problems (ulcers, pain, etc). if the owner is not keen on this, find a different horse.

step 2 - if the vet determines the horse is fine, then check saddle fit. badly fitting saddles are a number one cause of behavioural issues during riding. after fixing any saddle fit issues, the horse will still tend to behave the same way, because they are expecting the saddle to hurt, so you need to give them time to learn it won't hurt, and a firm yet gentle hand to correct the now learned behaviours. you say her back was sore, so i would suspect a bad saddle fit that caused this.

i personally don't think a change in farriers is causing her to rear. that is an evasion she has learned to get out of work or is her reaction to pain. fix the pain problem (ulcers, saddle fit, etc) and then work on the behavioural issues after.
 

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If I were you I would get a vet and maybe save up to get some sort of scan because maybe its a behavioural issue sometimes but it sounds like you are hurting her when you ride her (not your fault I mean maybe something is wrong with her and shes trying to tell you or something sorry if that sounds like im blaming you I didnt mean for it to sound that way)
 

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Talk to the farrier and see if this horse has hoof issues. Generally a horse will be reluctant to move, not rear and come down hard on the hooves. In order to rear a horse as to stop moving, rock back then gather it's body before it can go up. As soon as the horse stops, this is the time to bet it moving. Moving feet can't rear. Watch she doesn't fire a kick at you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We started using a different farrier this summer and the moment we switched to him her back got sore and was sore until we got her trimmed by someone else. I'm almost 100% sure this is farrier caused.
 

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I think the change in farriers may have just totally coincided with another issue that you haven't found the source of - the back pain. change in tack during that time? change in rider? change in topline musculature?
 

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Cracked ribs, broken ribs, thorn in flesh that saddle is hitting or girth is.

Saddle could have broken tree, nail/screw/something has worked loose and is jabbing her, or even have something in blanket too.

You need to stop riding the horse if this is happening. You are doing something that is causing pain by continuing to ride her, this is not your horse, and if you don't have the money to have a vet out, and also get the owner's permission too, then this is wrong to do to the horse.

I've seen bad farriers, poor trimming and I've never seen one cause a horse to rear under saddle. This is something else.

Leave the horse alone until this is addressed.
 
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