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If you properly condition your horse, you don't need "support" when jumping. You only need protection from occasional bumps if your horse hits a fence or interferes.

Injuries happen because people over jump thie horses and/or push them before they're ready to move on.
 

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OHHHHHHHHH! Thanks for celaring that up eventnwithwinston! I have my mom wrap Blue, lol. She knows how to do it right! You could really never put polos on too tight, because they have lots of give, unless you just put them on like REALLY tight, then that would be a huge problem!
 

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We just bought the Davis Splint boots for my horse, but someone said to take them back because they are lined with neoprene... she said that it absorbs the heat or something like that, and it can cause problem with their legs? is that true?
 

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We just bought the Davis Splint boots for my horse, but someone said to take them back because they are lined with neoprene... she said that it absorbs the heat or something like that, and it can cause problem with their legs? is that true?
never heard that! I have never had any problems with neoprene, some horses are alergic to it, but ive nver heard that!
 

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OHHHHHHHHH! Thanks for celaring that up eventnwithwinston! I have my mom wrap Blue, lol. She knows how to do it right! You could really never put polos on too tight, because they have lots of give, unless you just put them on like REALLY tight, then that would be a huge problem!
I'm not really sure what you mean. Really tight is too tight and you just said you can't put polos on too tight. Irregardless of your conflict in logic, it is very possible and easy to wrap polos with inconsistent pressure. They can do a lot of damaged if poorly wrapped.

As for the comments about SMBs, I think all that is just rumor. If someone has an article or statistics to show me I would consider changing my opinion but until there is proof I am just chalking it up to rumor. I have used SMBs on my mare since I bought her and have never had an issue with tendon weakness. They are there to add support to the horse's tendons when we put added strain and pressure on them that they would not usually undergo. While I don't put them on if I'm just going to be doing light works I wouldn't compete or do heavy works without them on. Yes, they can do damage if you put them on too tightly but they are pretty idiot proof in that aspect. Do you honestly think the pro-barrel racers (reiners, cutters...) are going to use items on their horses that are going to result in weak legs? I somehow doubt it.
 

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You could really never put polos on too tight, because they have lots of give, unless you just put them on like REALLY tight, then that would be a huge problem!
I did not realize that there is a huge difference here between "too tight" and "REALLY tight", however to each their own.

As far as SMB's goes, I have been using them for years and NEVER have had a problem with them. When you ask your horse to do something for you, have it be jumping, barrels, or trail riding, you are asking your horse to work for you. I am not sure about others on here, but I treat my horse as an athlete, as well as an investment. I want my horse to be well taken care of, so I protect her, and take care of her just as an athlete would take care of their body.

Sports Medicine Boots provide adequate support to the horses legs when working in strenuous environments. Not to mention that they are a million dollar corporation providing their product to millions of people. If they are so bad, why would people invest their money into them, and then proceed to place them on oh say a 50,000 dollar horse? Lets just consider the facts here.
 

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SMBs only provide minimal support, and certainly not enough to create "weak legs." SMBs are only marginally better than a well wrapped polo wrap that's wrapped under the fetlock.

In order to provide a degree of support that would prevent serious injury, the boot would not allow for a full range of motion.
 

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Well what I ment was that, if you just PULLLLLLL on them while wraping, not just do a little bit of inconsistansy, which would be a bad thing, but probably not going to do as much damage on the tendon as doing the wrap up way to tight. If that made ANY sense at all!
I've just heard so many rumors, I don't want to risk it. Blue is a top notch athleate now, and since she is, why would I need that kind of protecion. All she needs is something to protect from nicks and scraps
 

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I will stay with my boots of choice. Used them for many years in both dressage (when training) and jumper (training and showing).
 

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never heard that! I have never had any problems with neoprene, some horses are alergic to it, but ive nver heard that!
Hm, that was the first time i heard anything about the neoprean too, we already took the boots back, so i guess we'll try sheepskin/lambskin ones... can't go wrong with those... can you?
xD
 

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There are a lot of different opinions on this but overall I prefer not to boot or wrap unless absolutely necessary. When jumping, if it's a height and footing that the horse is used to and conditioned for, then I will not use leg protection. When going outside of their current conditioning level by more than just a little bit, I use protection. As their conditioning level increases, then I use the boots less - always keeping them unbooted for the level they are currently conditioned for.

I will always use boots for shows when doing jumpers (as many horses tend to get more hyped up at shows, and are more likely to take a misstep or cause injury), and will always use boots for XC as there's a different level of danger/challenge there.

I will also use boots when the footing is crappy, and out of range of the horse's conditioning. My horses are conditioned in mud and snow and as long as the conditions are reasonable (and the workout comparable for the level of conditioning of the horse and the tolerance of the footing - we're not hand galloping a 3'6" fence in slop just because....and w/o protection mind you...), then they do not wear boots. If the ring is extra-hard let's say, where the concussion of riding is going to be magnified and I'm doing more than a light workout, then I'll boot/wrap. Even hard ground has its conditioning benefits in moderation. Keywords - IN MODERATION. And of course you need to build up the horse to the right level of conditioning not just go out and go gung ho!
 

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There are a lot of different opinions on this but overall I prefer not to boot or wrap unless absolutely necessary. When jumping, if it's a height and footing that the horse is used to and conditioned for, then I will not use leg protection. When going outside of their current conditioning level by more than just a little bit, I use protection. As their conditioning level increases, then I use the boots less - always keeping them unbooted for the level they are currently conditioned for.

I will always use boots for shows when doing jumpers (as many horses tend to get more hyped up at shows, and are more likely to take a misstep or cause injury), and will always use boots for XC as there's a different level of danger/challenge there.

I will also use boots when the footing is crappy, and out of range of the horse's conditioning. My horses are conditioned in mud and snow and as long as the conditions are reasonable (and the workout comparable for the level of conditioning of the horse and the tolerance of the footing - we're not hand galloping a 3'6" fence in slop just because....and w/o protection mind you...), then they do not wear boots. If the ring is extra-hard let's say, where the concussion of riding is going to be magnified and I'm doing more than a light workout, then I'll boot/wrap. Even hard ground has its conditioning benefits in moderation. Keywords - IN MODERATION. And of course you need to build up the horse to the right level of conditioning not just go out and go gung ho!
very informative post, and you make allot of sense.

Here is my train of thought though - being an eventer through and through.

Horses take allot of traction when jumping, whether fabulously conditioned or not. There is allot of shock taken in on landing, if they hit the fence, and even when hand galloping over the uneven terrain.

Allot of traction, allot of shock, allot of wear and tear. Just as professoinal athletes you see in the Olympics who wear top notch running shoes to help absorb all of that, why not the same with our horses?

We see allot of injuries in the leg area. Shin Splints, torn tendons, ligaments. We see bowed tendons - not only because of lack of proper conditioning and riders throwing their horses over fences because they, the rider wants to jump - without putting any consideration into the horse....but also because of lack of protection and care of the legs while jumping.

I want my partners legs well protected when we jump - that is why I always use SMB's.

They do all of the above, protect, prevent, support. They help to take in that energy that would be fully absorbed into their joints and ligaments as it is, minimalizing that wear and tear.

My horses legs are conditioned due to lots of Hacking, Dressage and Conditoining over terrain. But when I jump, I want that extra needed protection - regardless.

I want longivety in those legs of his, because he is very valuable to me. And I do that by adequate, proper protection.

I went to the equine affair in Detroit Michigan a couple of years ago - and they put on a long and thorough clinic about that, very informative. Held and hosted by Equine Veterinarians who specialize in leg injuries.

And after watching what I saw, and taking in what was given tome, that is why I use SMB's. Maybe for my own personal relief.....who's to say. But I've seen the proof of what these boots do, and I swear by mine.
 

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Hm, that was the first time i heard anything about the neoprean too, we already took the boots back, so i guess we'll try sheepskin/lambskin ones... can't go wrong with those... can you?
xD
ahh, I don't think so lol!
 

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I want my partners legs well protected when we jump - that is why I always use SMB's.

They do all of the above, protect, prevent, support. They help to take in that energy that would be fully absorbed into their joints and ligaments as it is, minimalizing that wear and tear.

My horses legs are conditioned due to lots of Hacking, Dressage and Conditoining over terrain. But when I jump, I want that extra needed protection - regardless.
Great point to make! Even though you took the boots back, always keep in mind that your horse is an athlete and needs to be treated as so. The more support you give them now, then longer your horses legs will remain strong.
 
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