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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hy mare arrived yesterday. She is 4 years old and total sweetheart . We rescued from a horrible ranch in grand forks and she was severely abued and neglected . Her coat is just horrid , shes skiddish , and her feet are just awful ! Mainly just a bit overgrown and chipping off but her front right is split all the way up . The lady who is boarding her says she will need corrective shoeing ... How much will that cost ? Would I need shoes on all four feet or just the one or the front two ? We have her on Beet pulp , equine 2000 , grain , and loose mineral . We were told the loose mineral will help with her hoof but I could also get some other hoof supplement if needed . Please let me know what you guys think .. to be okay . If she was left at that horrible mans place she would not have survived over winter .
 

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She will need corrective shoeing, but mostly it's for carrying a rider's weight. If she is just trimmed correctly, this should grow out on it's own, but it will take probably 2 years to correct.
Ask for farrier for advice bc he/she will have the answers. It will take a clip and a corrective shoe to hold the outside of the hoof together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you look on my other thread about the bump on her nose you can see all four feet and her body in the one picture . i don't know how to post pictures other than when you first start the tread aha . Do you think with a very well managed diet and corrective shoeing she will be all healed for the spring ? I will not be doing much work with her until the spring so no need to worry about her carrying weight
 

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If you look on my other thread about the bump on her nose you can see all four feet and her body in the one picture . i don't know how to post pictures other than when you first start the tread aha . Do you think with a very well managed diet and corrective shoeing she will be all healed for the spring ? I will not be doing much work with her until the spring so no need to worry about her carrying weight

Please be careful of corrective shoeing as it can stop a weak hoof from growing stronger which is what it naturally wants to do and a stronger hoof is what you need (a healthy strong hoof would not normally crack like that and so leads me to suspect that it is weak from an inappropriate diet, although that would only be a guess). Corrective shoeing does have it's place though, just be aware that it can prolong a problem in some instances.
 

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Go to advanced then scroll up page theres a manage attachment click on that. Then you can uploand pics right here on your post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What about hoof boots ? If I get two of those for her front feet ? I would feel better about that then shoes . But if she needs shoes that works to
 

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Please be careful of corrective shoeing as it can stop a weak hoof from growing stronger
NOT TRUE AT ALL. Proper shoeing can support and stabilize the damaged foot so it the horse can move comfortably while it regrows. AND special frog and sole support materials can be added to stimulate better circulation and create even faster growth and make a stronger foot faster. I often use the RIGHT KIND of shoeing to jump start weak feet o better strength quickly in preparation for barefoot.

In THIS case it apears though that uless tjhis horse has a job to go to right away proper trimming and relieving that long toe of the leverae ith a good roll around the front should begin the process. it will regrow in within six months to a yesr, likely bout 8 months. Simply trimming it correctly is the key. If it needs shoes , a shoe designed to take ALL the load off the toe will help. It should not cost much more than whatever the regular price of shoeing is in your area, and you should not have to shoe all 4 feet. Just the fronts if this is a front foot. .
which is what it naturally wants to do and a stronger hoof is what you need (a healthy strong hoof would not normally crack like that and so leads me to suspect that it is weak from an inappropriate diet, although that would only be a guess).
Hooves simply split like that when the foot is allowed to grow too long and the leverage at the toe splits it. Simple as that. This type of split has nothing to do with diet, barefoot or shoes.
Corrective shoeing does have it's place though, just be aware that it can prolong a problem in some instances.
NO IT WILL NOT. (and yes I am shouting this ....) The right kind of Corrective shoeing will be designed to help heal a problem, and speed the process. I know of NO instance where the right kind of shoeing delayed the healing of any foot problem. If a shoeing did, then it was not the right kind of shoeing. There is a lot more to *correct* shoeing than slapping metal around the edge of the foot.
 

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From what I can see on this horse it should be a pretty simple shoeing, not complicated but the key will be to insure that toe is unloaded and the heels are trimmed back enough so the outer parts of the foot stops bending forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I will have corrective shoes on her :) Had the vet out to see her today ! He said she looks perfectly fine to him other than being neglected .. he thinks she's about 4 months pregnant because of how skinny she is and how big her belly is . So we will get an ultra sound and hopefully she just has a big hay belly ! Thanks Patty for you advice , it was very detailed lol . I will be putting shoes on only her front feet and hopefully she will be healed up in the spring so I can start her training .
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was told not to shoe her at this time of the year because if she slips on the ice and snow it can be very dangerous .. thoughts?
 

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I was told not to shoe her at this time of the year because if she slips on the ice and snow it can be very dangerous .. thoughts?
Snow tends to "ball" in hooves which are shod, it doesn't in barehooves, and yes barehooves slip less but if you are not riding they might not be an issue. I personally wouldn't shoe a pregnant recovering mare who is not being ridden, but I would have those hooves trimmed by a really good trimmer and treated for infection - you must treat for infection even if you shoe.
 

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I
was told not to shoe her at this time of the year because if she slips on the ice and snow it can be very dangerous .. thoughts?
anti snowball pads under the shoes, and a couple of traction nails in the rear nail holes will remedy that concern. It's a few dollars more but since its only two hooves not a big deal.
 

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What's the 'corrective' shoeing for? If it's just for the crack, good trimming to balance the feet & relieve the wall & bracing across the face of the crack, along with treating any infection, will prevent it being perpetuated & enable it to grow out. Using conventional shoes to hold just the ground surface together, which will also necessarily mean keeping the toe wall loaded, IME doesn't tend to help heal cracks.
 

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Friend's mare had a very similar crack, our fantastic farrier put a little metal brace across it and kept it regularly trimmed and with a good mustang roll and it grew out. After seeing that, I'm of the belief that a brace is a very good idea - this mare's crack had reached the coronet before my friend got her and she still has a permanent groove in her hoof which makes the wall a bit prone to cracking on that same line. Given how well the brace prevented further damage, had the crack been braced before it reached the coronet there wouldn't have been permanent damage done, or so I reckon.
 
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