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@Foxhunter -- wow on that video. That guy makes it look so easy! "Yup, I do this every day..."
 
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^^ Yes, very impressive video and I hope I'll never need it. At my age, Bandit is probably my last horse and thankfully he gives lot of warning now when feeling upset.
 

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I have used it on several occasions.

Horses that rear are dangerous to be sure. Ones like the OPs filly more so than a confirmed reader who knows what it is doing. These confirmed horses are very unlikely to flip over but will throw themselves to the side which is less dangerous for the rider. Still risky though!
 

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This is what happened. I was working her in the outdoor arena, all was going well. Had been trotting her for maybe 10 minutes working on softness in the face and bending at the pole. A truck and trailer zoomed by going super fast and rattling super loud. She took off bolting and I pulled her in a one rein stop and she instantly gave me her head and slowed and stopped. We were then facing the trailer and she had stopped. I petted her, told her she was a good girl, then she ran backwards and flipped over on me. Completely extreme I thought!! I’ve had them buck and bolt, but never this.

Could have been a freak thing?? Sounds like you are doing everything right, as far as training methods. Sometimes some things just happen.



For example: Last summer, at a barrel race, my Shotgun reared before we started our run. And not just a little one. I was actually thinking about how I was going to bail before he went over (thankfully he didn't). And it was out of the blue. He has never even gotten light on the front end before. NEVER. He was 8 years old last year and I've owned him since he was a 6 month old, so I know him. I scolded him, and we went in and did our run. (knock on wood - he's never tried or suggested it again since) I think I know why he did it: the arena set up was a little confusing where you had to come around the corner of some corrals before you were lined up for the alley, and I think he was just ready for his run but so confused because he didn't know where to go, so he went up. I don't feel he gave me any warning or signs either. He just did it.



So.... It's up to your comfort level. If she tends to be a reactive and nervous type filly, it may happen again. You can't prevent them from spooking, as things like this will happen. Again, sounds like you are taking the right approach to keeping her relaxed, calm, and thinking, and that's the best you can do with that type of horse.


Sometimes I know there's not a heck of a lot you can do if you get flipped over on..... but were you able to reprimand her in any way for her rearing? Something to let her know that that was wrong?
 

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I do like what Tinyliny had to say. To me it sounds like the mare already had her grey cells scattered from the truck and trailer and just hadn't regained her senses.

My horse is 22 this year. I have learned that when she is truly frightened of something, she never forgets it. Never. The one time she unloaded me (some months ago) was completely my own fault for pushing past her panic point. As I have aged I have acquired the ability to be far more patient that when I was younger...either that or it's just the fact that I am not is any rush to do anything. I have learned her "alerts" and am willing to give her the time to accept the object, or whatever.

I know when you have a business and need to get results. But some horses simply need more time. Most of them seem to have their overload point. I wish you success with this youngster.
 
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