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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I think I have given this posting an unusual title but then again, maybe not. I am looking for some suggestions to control the stench and wetness of urine in my geldings stall. His stall is open to his paddock. Sometimes he will pee outside but most of the time, he chooses to pee in his stall. I muck his stall twice a day and use pine shavings but the sand and dirt beneath the shavings is extremely wet. This is causing twice the flies in his stall as in our mares stall. She tries to act like a lady and keeps it out of her stall.

She has a corner in her paddock where she likes to do her business 90% of the time. She will stop eating and go to this spot to pee or poop. Then she will return to her stall and continue eating.

Couple of questions from all of this;
Can I train him not to pee in his stall?
Is there something I can do or apply to control or eliminate the flies?

I have a feed trough supplement ordered to help break the life cycle but that will not help with the urine. I am also considering box fan holders to place fans in the stalls. These will help with the AZ heat this summer as well.

If anyone has any suggestions, I will be appreciative of all. Thanks to everyone up front.

CC
 

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Put rubber mats in stall only way to be able to totally remove wet and keep stall dry. My stalls were a soggy wet mess where horse's peed and stunk.Invested in rubber mats and no more soggy mess no more stink.
 

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I use powdered lime in my stalls to cut odor as it is a neutralizer of acid.
Some use a product called PDQ or PDZ I believe its called.
Some use pellet bedding in the urine spot saying it is more absorbent...don't use that either.
I use shavings myself.
Scoop out what I must, occasionally a load of dirt put in the hole dug...
Always cover the product put down for smell before allowing the horse access to their stall again.
Air drying the wet ground is great, but be careful you cover and replace shavings first over that location if you add any product.
Mats work too as rambo mentioned but you must periodically pull them out and clean underneath.. a filthy, dirty and horrible stench of a job... :frown_color:
Where now your ground is actually absorbing and dissipating the wet you will need more shavings to do that absorbing of liquid..

Your horse though chooses his stall so he not get "splashed" when he urinates is often the reason for why they do what they do.
Shavings buffer the splash-back he would have on his legs...
Since it sounds like the horse has a attached paddock area, can you just lock him outdoors during the day?
Is there a overhang for weather protection?

As for fly deterrents...
Crazy as it sounds...
Gallon Ziploc bag, fill 1/2 full with water, drop a shiny copper penny in it...seal and hang the bag from the corner of it and it repels many flies. Use several bags spaced around and see if it makes a difference in fly population.
Also, make or invest in some bat houses as they love to eat flies and mosquitoes...
I don't feed my horses manufactured feed-through repellents as to me that is poison and not going there.
Some feed garlic, caution with that and do research before for adverse side-effects it can have...
Some use sulfur salt blocks as sulfur also repels flies...again, research so you know and understand pros and cons of anything ingested...
Of course, a fan circulating the air is one of the best fly deterrents made...you just need that power source to run it...if you do fans, please, please only use sealed motors to reduce fire risk from dust/dirt getting in and overheating the motor causing a catastrophe.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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One thought- he likely pees inside BECAUSE of the bedding, while I'm sure you want to give him somewhere nice to sleep it may be worthwhile to put some bedding outside where he goes already and you want to encourage him to use more and take out the bedding from the stall.
 

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Gravel then tamped stone dust then rubber mats then heavy bedding with shavings. Clean out twice a day. I found that a snow shovel makes the perfect tool to scrape up all the wet shavings. Sprinkle Sweet PDZ on the wet spots before adding fresh shavings. It is zeolite, a volcanic mineral drying agent. I've had a pony on stall rest for a month and a horse who will come in out of a five acre pasture just to pee in her stall. It never smells at all in my barn.
 

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Scoop out the soaked, smelly dirt. Replace with tamped gravel/stone dust and put rubber mats over the top. Bed a corner of his attached run with shavings and only put a thin layer in the stall. Many horses will pee in the stall because of the bedding, so bedding an area outside encourages them to pee outside instead. I had a gelding who would go all day without urinating in his pasture, because in the summer, the hard ground made it splash his legs. He'd hustle in from turnout and soak his stall. We bedded an area of his pasture with bedding and he started using that and was much less desperate at the end of the day.
 

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I used to live in AZ and never could figure out how my one gelding managed to keep a pee spot wet all the way down to China. I put small gravel (bags from Lowe's or Home Depot) in the spot, then put rubber mats over the gravel. All that did was make him move the spot. My stabling was a mare motel with 48' X 36' stalls, 20' was covered, 28 was not. Of course he peed in the shade. I found that once a week, covering his pee spot to make him move would help keep things dryer and a whole lot less stinky. I finally managed to put mats down in the area that was covered, no bedding, and he'd go out in the uncovered sand to pee. That was the best I ever came up with.

Oh, and fly predators & EM1 from Arbico in Tucson.
 

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If base under mats is properly done no need to pull up mats to clean under them. Under my stall mats its dry no stink going on. We payed big dollars to have it done right. All pee drains down so never wet under mats.

Had dirt stall floors its nasty never ending soggy mess.
 

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If base under mats is properly done no need to pull up mats to clean under them. Under my stall mats its dry no stink going on. We payed big dollars to have it done right. All pee drains down so never wet under mats.

Had dirt stall floors its nasty never ending soggy mess.
Agree with this. I've never seen matts pulled up any sort of routinely. Ours are over sand which I don't think is ideal (it shifts and the rats tunnel in it but otherwise good- if it were my choice would have had at least some gravel in there) but no problem at all as far as bedding/drainage/smell/etc is concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions. When we built the barn, we placed a 50-50 mix, sand and gravel, over the dirt floors. I did not tamp it down. We then place the shavings over the 50-50.(Of course)
Never considered putting mats over the 50-50 and then shavings, lightly. Thanks for this suggestion.

On my way to the TSC to get mats and more shavings.

Thanks all
CC
 
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