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As allot of you know I prefer foundation Quarter Horses to any other kind of QH. But, I have several Champion Stallions and sire of Champions that I personally question should they have their manhood.

Jetsmoke N Thunder - Champagne Foundation Quarter Horse Stallion at Stud - Bohannon Farms, Bardstown, Kentucky I think his color is allot his reason for being a stallion

AQHA Stallion Iron Age

These Irons Are Hot - AQHA Stallion

Only In The Moonlite - AQHA Stallion

And if you think I choice those stallions becuase they are not my type, here is a foundation QH a Hancock bred one that I feel the same way about.
Foundation Quarter Horse and Found Horse Registry at FoundationHorses.com

Waggoner Ranch - The #1 LIFETIME Leading Breeder of Cutting Horses This is Mr cutting horse stud. I think he is too light in the legs and too heavy muscled. In other word and accident weighting to happen.
 

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I think the first stud is actually pretty nice. They have an advertising problem, for sure, but the HORSE actually looks nice. Good legs appropriate to his body, looks like he's got a nice attitude and he definitely has a kind eye and nice face.

The next three, I'm kind of with you on that. They're basically the same horse, so at least two of them could be gelded without fear of losing rare qualities. Plus it looks like non of them use their bodies well or are particularly athletic, though they do have reasonably decent conformation for what is fashionable in QH's these days.

The next two are fugly. Without a doubt. The first one isn't presented well and has a poorly conformed neck and chest, and is light in the hind. The second, well, you can't tell anything from the photo, but it does look like he lacks adequate bone in his legs to carry his body effectively.

Basically, my thoughts are that the first four could be gelded or left at stud and wouldn't do any harm either way, but the last two should be gelded, quick style, before they reproduce any more.
 

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personally i like the three WP/HUS studs. at least they are more level than 90% of the QH stallions on the market today. there are WAY too many but high, light front ended QH's out there. of course my opinion is only based on the two photos of each as i cant see the video's
 

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personally i like the three WP/HUS studs. at least they are more level than 90% of the QH stallions on the market today. there are WAY too many but high, light front ended QH's out there. of course my opinion is only based on the two photos of each as i cant see the video's
I would agree with that statement, overall. However, even though they are better, I would maintain that they still don't look super athletic.
 

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Basically, my thoughts are that the first four could be gelded or left at stud and wouldn't do any harm either way, but the last two should be gelded, quick style, before they reproduce any more.
Well I agree that the first is just OK. Being a sire of some off type registration is no accomplishment. What he is is a color breeders horse.

The next. Not my type and are nothing more or less then what is already in their discipline.

The last. Well he has earned his manhood and there is no reason he should not keep it. That pictures of HBC is a more resent picture and he is an older stallion.
 

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Huh, I don't find High Brow Cat (at the Waggonner ranch link) to be heavy-muscled AT ALL. In fact he looks narrower than my three Thoroughbred mares, and probably has more bone in ratio to his size/build than two of the three-- and I am pretty sure he is at least two hands shorter than 2 of the three also, LOL.

After some Googling, I also am not seeing big muscles in his get either. Of course a side view photo would help evaluate his conformation better.

But of course conformation is not what he is bred far-- its cutting talent-- and THAT he has, and is passing on at the highest levels-- hence his over- $20,000 stud fee. Here is a video of one of his sons winning the 2006 NCHA 3 yo futurity--
 

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The first horse is an AQHA champion and a performance horse. If breed champions can't be stallions then what can be? The next two are fine horses and represent the type quite well and judging by the breed fee are quite sought after. The Hancock horses picture is part of the problem and Hancock horses are not real photogenic but he could make an awesome gelding.

Now, I think it's quite ballsey to critique a horse like High Brow Cat. Far better horseman than grace these electronic halls have shelled out big money for his foals. In the cutting horse world performance is what counts and HBC horses perform like none other. NCHA sire of the year for 6 straight years and the sire of horses earning over 37 million dollars means to me that he probably is a good stallion and maybe should cover a few more mare before he's gelded.

I would like to see your stallions. Make sure to include money earned and world titles.
 

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Basically, my thoughts are that the first four could be gelded or left at stud and wouldn't do any harm either way, but the last two should be gelded, quick style, before they reproduce any more.
All I can say is WOW! I'm sure the people that are shelling out $20000 for HBC stud fee will be devastated to hear you say that. I think maybe your not as good as you think you are.
 

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Keven

The first horse is not an AQHA world Champion. He is a
2002 WFQHA World Show Top 10
in Junior Handy Ranch Horse.

2 Conformation, 49 Performance pts. in
Jr Handy Ranch Horse, Junior Ranch Riding
and Open Ranch Reining



WFQHA = World Foundation QH Association
 

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You know a good sire when you can pick out his get by the way they get the jog done. You can tell a HBC in the ring just about every time. Very distinctive.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Now, I think it's quite ballsey to critique a horse like High Brow Cat. Far better horseman than grace these electronic halls have shelled out big money for his foals. In the cutting horse world performance is what counts and HBC horses perform like none other. NCHA sire of the year for 6 straight years and the sire of horses earning over 37 million dollars means to me that he probably is a good stallion and maybe should cover a few more mare before he's gelded.

You quite right, better horsemen than me love him and his foals. But, I still feel that Peppy San Badger was a allround horse. I really prefer a good sound allround ranch style horse with allot of cow.
 

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Keven

The first horse is not an AQHA world Champion. He is a
2002 WFQHA World Show Top 10
in Junior Handy Ranch Horse.
2 Conformation, 49 Performance pts. in
Jr Handy Ranch Horse, Junior Ranch Riding
and Open Ranch Reining


WFQHA = World Foundation QH Association
Your right it was a son and it was WFQHA champion. It is probably a color thing that has kept him a stallion.
 

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Now, I think it's quite ballsey to critique a horse like High Brow Cat. Far better horseman than grace these electronic halls have shelled out big money for his foals. In the cutting horse world performance is what counts and HBC horses perform like none other. NCHA sire of the year for 6 straight years and the sire of horses earning over 37 million dollars means to me that he probably is a good stallion and maybe should cover a few more mare before he's gelded.

You quite right, better horsemen than me love him and his foals. But, I still feel that Peppy San Badger was a allround horse. I really prefer a good sound allround ranch style horse with allot of cow.
I wouldn't consider any cutting horse a ranch style horse. Most of the raqnchs I have been on have a lot miles to cover and need a horse with some leg and some size since they may have to rope what they just cut out and drag it into a trailer. I'm not sure there are very many all around horses left that are too well known. In the 50's and 60's it was not uncommon for people to load up thier ranch horse and go to a cutting on friday and roping on saturday and race the same horse on sunday and do well in all three. As more money has been added to each event they became more specialized untill now the cutting horses couldn't outrun a shetland pony, the rope horses can't recognize a cow from the front and a race horse can't lope both directions. As far as an all around sire the hancock you listed would be far more versatile than any of the others.
 

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Huh, I don't find High Brow Cat (at the Waggonner ranch link) to be heavy-muscled AT ALL. In fact he looks narrower than my three Thoroughbred mares, and probably has more bone in ratio to his size/build than two of the three-- and I am pretty sure he is at least two hands shorter than 2 of the three also, LOL.

After some Googling, I also am not seeing big muscles in his get either. Of course a side view photo would help evaluate his conformation better.

But of course conformation is not what he is bred far-- its cutting talent-- and THAT he has, and is passing on at the highest levels-- hence his over- $20,000 stud fee. Here is a video of one of his sons winning the 2006 NCHA 3 yo futurity--
YouTube- 2006 NCHA Futurity Open champion
Well, considering his accomplishments (which I had absolutely no knowledge of prior to your post), I guess you're right. Having taken a second look at his ad, I will admit perhaps I was a little hasty in judging him unfit for fatherhood. It's probably just a style thing, because I'm not into cutting or reining or anything like that, so I personally wouldn't breed to him, but for someone who does compete in those events, he's probably pretty fantastic.
 

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Having taken a second look at his ad, I will admit perhaps I was a little hasty in judging him unfit for fatherhood.
Yeah and Osama Bin Laden is kind of cranky. You must not have looked very hard at the ad because everything I wrote in my post is right there in the ad except the breed fee. How's that foot tasting?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I wouldn't consider any cutting horse a ranch style horse. Most of the raqnchs I have been on have a lot miles to cover and need a horse with some leg and some size since they may have to rope what they just cut out and drag it into a trailer. I'm not sure there are very many all around horses left that are too well known. In the 50's and 60's it was not uncommon for people to load up thier ranch horse and go to a cutting on friday and roping on saturday and race the same horse on sunday and do well in all three. As more money has been added to each event they became more specialized untill now the cutting horses couldn't outrun a shetland pony, the rope horses can't recognize a cow from the front and a race horse can't lope both directions. As far as an all around sire the hancock you listed would be far more versatile than any of the others.
I know very little about western ranches. I was raised working cattle with ATVs on a cattle farm in Kentucky. I thought they could be compared to a corral horse. I knew that, they could not be compared to a circle horse. I have gotten the terms circle horse and corral from Ranch Horsemanship by Curt Pate.
 

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A lot of the bigger ramodas out west still work the ranch on horse back. even the 6666 still uses a lot of their horses on the ranch.
 
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