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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read an article that said that a stretched white line almost always indicates subclinical laminitis. Is this true? The pony in question is overweight, but not grossly so, not tender on hooves, and is ridden regularly. Her toes are also quite long. Could the stretched white line simply be a side effect of her toes being too long?
 

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A stretched white line is definitely a sign of subclinical laminitis. Laminitis has several causes, excess sugar in the diet is only one! Toxic shock laminitis is fairly common and has killed some big name racehorses (one in particular whose name I can't remember was because of a spider bite). Concussive laminitis, aka road founder, is obviously caused by lots of heavy impacts on a hard surface. Mechanical laminitis is generally from a long toe and is probably what this pony is dealing with.
 

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Thank you, that explanation makes sense.

So if this is sublinical mechanic lamitis, obviosuly a good trimmer needs to look at her. What about riding? It seems to me that riding could make things worse, since more pressure is being put on the hooves. If this pony could be ridden less, would that be better for her? I don't think not being ridden is an option, as she's a lesson pony. (She's not my pony, but I'd like to do what I can for her)
 

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Thank you, that explanation makes sense.

So if this is sublinical mechanic lamitis, obviosuly a good trimmer needs to look at her. What about riding? It seems to me that riding could make things worse, since more pressure is being put on the hooves. If this pony could be ridden less, would that be better for her? I don't think not being ridden is an option, as she's a lesson pony. (She's not my pony, but I'd like to do what I can for her)
If this is the case for this pony, common sense would tell me that better trims and getting the toes back would go a long way to helping her hooves become healthier.
 

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What @LoriF said. Riding isn't ideal, and if it were an option, I would turn her out in a paddock with decently varied footing (sand, clay, rocks etc all have different effects on the feet and the healthiest foot is one that handles all types of terrain) with good farrier care until the feet are under control.
 
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